Children of the Australian ISIS terrorist supporters who are stranded in the Syrian refugee camp will be brought home

ISIS children travel to Australia: orphans of killed terrorists will be flown back from the refugee camp and many more await the green light

  • Orphaned children of a hunter of an Islamic state could soon return to Australia
  • Three children, between six and twelve years old, are stranded in a refugee camp
  • Political pressure has been built to extradite Australians trapped in the camps

Orphaned children of an Islamic State hunter detained in a Syrian refugee camp may soon be returned to Australia if political pressure continues to increase.

The three children, aged between six and twelve, were brought from Australia to Syria when their parents Yasin Rizvic and Fauzia Khamal Bacha joined the terrorist group in 2014.

Rizvic, from Bosnia, was a leading figure in the Al-Furqan Islamic Center in Melbourne – often linked to radical extremism before it was closed in 2015.

He died while fighting for the terrorist group in 2016. Bacha also died later, but the circumstances surrounding her death are unknown.

The young children have been stranded in Al-Hawl refugee camp in western Syria controlled by the Kurdish government since their parents were killed, ABC reported.

However, the children could soon be returned to Australia.

The young children have been stranded in Al-Hawl refugee camp in western Syria controlled by the Kurdish government since their parents were killed

The young children have been stranded in Al-Hawl refugee camp in western Syria controlled by the Kurdish government since their parents were killed

Yasin Rizvic (photo) from Bosnia, was a top figure in the Al-Furqan center in Melbourne, often associated with radical extremism

Yasin Rizvic (photo) from Bosnia, was a top figure in the Al-Furqan center in Melbourne, often associated with radical extremism

Yasin Rizvic (photo) from Bosnia, was a top figure in the Al-Furqan center in Melbourne – often linked to radical extremism

The Australian has reported that three children, presumably of Bosnian descent, would probably be the first children from the war to return home.

It is unclear whether the aforementioned orphans are the children of Rizvic.

The Australian authorities reportedly worked on moving the children to Lebanon or Iraq, where they would meet an Australian consular officer before they were transferred to Melbourne.

The authorities have also tried to find family members in Australia who could take the children, but it is clear that the children do not have much in terms of extended family in the country.

Peter Dutton, Secretary of the Interior, said the children should not suffer, but firmly expressed the government's view that no Australian official would be jeopardized to release them from a conflict area.

& # 39; When it comes to children, we treat every case on its merits, but in each case we place the safety of Australians at the top of the list. & # 39;

Khaled Sharrouf (far right) and Abdullah (12) and Zarqawi (11) died in September 2017 during an American air attack on ISIS

Khaled Sharrouf (far right) and Abdullah (12) and Zarqawi (11) died in September 2017 during an American air attack on ISIS

Khaled Sharrouf (far right) and Abdullah (12) and Zarqawi (11) died in September 2017 during an American air attack on ISIS

The orphaned children (photos & # 39; s) of infamous terrorist Khaled Sharrouf could be back in Australia within a few weeks (Zaynab, top left; Hoda, top right; Humzeh, bottom center; Abdullah, bottom right; Zarqawi, bottom left)

The orphaned children (photos & # 39; s) of infamous terrorist Khaled Sharrouf could be back in Australia within a few weeks (Zaynab, top left; Hoda, top right; Humzeh, bottom center; Abdullah, bottom right; Zarqawi, bottom left)

The orphaned children (photos & # 39; s) of infamous terrorist Khaled Sharrouf could be back in Australia within a few weeks (Zaynab, top left; Hoda, top right; Humzeh, bottom center; Abdullah, bottom right; Zarqawi, bottom left)

Who was Yasin Rizvic?

Yasin Rizvic settled in Australia after fleeing war-torn Bosnia in the 1990s

He was a close associate of Harun Mehicevic, the founder of the Al-Furqan Da & wah Center in Melbourne

Rizvic is said to have left Australia around 2014 with his wife and children

Under pressure from the United States government and Syrian democratic forces, it has been urged that citizens return home as quickly as possible.

There are 40 surviving Australian women and children who were dragged into the bloody battle for Baghouz.

The three youngest children of the notorious terrorist Khaled Sharrouf have also been kept in the refugee camp.

The children beg for help to return to Australia, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has said that national security was his first priority.

Zaynab, 17, Hoda, 16, and Humzeh, 8, were brought to Syria by their parents, who have since died.

Zaynab now has two toddler daughters and is heavily pregnant with a third child.

Mr Morrison said the government had worked with international aid workers last month to repatriate them.

Australians beg to come home after fighting with ISIS

Oliver Bridgeman, 21

Olive Bridgeman, 21, (photo) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.

Olive Bridgeman, 21, (photo) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.

Olive Bridgeman, 21, (photo) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.

  • The 21-year-old from Toowoomba in Queensland & Darling Downs claimed that he had traveled to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.
  • He previously assured his mother and father that he had not fought in the war-torn country, where ISIS terrorists are fighting for control.
  • His passport has been canceled by the Australian government and he has been stuck in the war-torn area since 2016.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26,

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (photo), was caught just outside Baghouz.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (photo), was caught just outside Baghouz.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (photo), was caught just outside Baghouz.

  • Alam joined the Islamic State just four weeks after it proclaimed its so-called Caliphate in 2014.
  • He reportedly expressed his regret for his participation.
  • The 26-year-old faces spend time in a prison camp in Syria and can be brought to Iraq for trial or possibly deported to Australia, where he can be prosecuted.

Ahmed Merhi, 27

Ahmed Merhi, 27, (photo) has begged Australia to help him escape.

Ahmed Merhi, 27, (photo) has begged Australia to help him escape.

Ahmed Merhi, 27, (photo) has begged Australia to help him escape.

  • The Sydney terrorist, Ahmed Merhi, has begged Australia to help him after he was sentenced to death by being stuck in Iraq.
  • The former student of the Granville Boys High School, from the west of Sydney, traveled to Syria in 2014 or 2015.
  • He claimed at the time that he was traveling to the war-torn area to provide assistance.

Janai Safar, 24

Janai Safar, 24, (photo), has previously vowed never to return to Australia.

Janai Safar, 24, (photo), has previously vowed never to return to Australia.

Janai Safar, 24, (photo), has previously vowed never to return to Australia.

  • Safar lives in a refugee camp in northern Syria after his defeat.
  • She left Australia to allegedly become a member of the jihadist terror group in 2015.
  • She previously promised that she would never return to Australia.
  • & # 39; It was my decision to go here to leave naked women in the street. I don't want my son being brought up there, & she said.

Zehra Duman, 24,

Zehra Duman, 24, (photo) hit the headlines in Australia when she fled to Syria in 2014.

Zehra Duman, 24, (photo) hit the headlines in Australia when she fled to Syria in 2014.

Zehra Duman, 24, (photo) hit the headlines in Australia when she fled to Syria in 2014.

  • Duman, from Melbourne, is believed to be held at the al-Hawl refugee camp in Syria with her two-year-old son and six-month-old daughter.
  • She claims that she has been trying to leave ISIS for two years.
  • The 24-year-old said she knew Australians would be angry with her, but emphasized: & My children have the right to be treated as normal children. & # 39;

Khaled Sharrouf & # 39; s children: Zaynab, 17, Hoda, 16, and Humzeh, eight

Zaynab (top left), Hoda (top right) and Humzeh (bottom, center) are in the al-Howl camp.

Zaynab (top left), Hoda (top right) and Humzeh (bottom, center) are in the al-Howl camp.

Zaynab (top left), Hoda (top right) and Humzeh (bottom, center) are in the al-Howl camp.

  • The remaining three children of the Australian terrorist have been detained since mid-March in al-Hawl refugee camp in northeastern Syria.
  • Their mother, Tara Nettleton, who lives in Sydney, smuggled the children from Australia after her husband left to join the Caliphate.
  • Nettleton would have died in 2016, while Sharrouf and his two oldest sons would have been killed in 2017 in an air raid.

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