Advertisements
Young children eat more vegetables according to a new study, especially brightly colored vegetables such as carrots, peas, sweet corn and broccoli

Peas in our time! More and more children eat their vegetables and opt for trendy superfoods such as kale and celeriac

  • A survey of 1,000 children found that young people enjoy superfoods such as kale
  • A quarter of all children between four and nine have tried kale
  • About 22 percent have tried eggplant, while 16 percent eat celeriac
  • Two thirds of the parents said it was easier to try food with the whole family
Advertisements

It is the struggle between the dining tables that has frustrated generations of parents, but young children will finally be hungry for fruits and vegetables.

According to a survey of 1,000 children up to nine years old and parents, a growing number of young people love nothing more than smashing trendy superfoods such as kale and celeriac.

It suggests that young gourmets are more daring, willing to try a wide and exotic assortment of vegetables that would have caused tantrums in previous generations. Nearly a quarter (24 percent) of children aged four to nine have eaten kale, 22 percent have tried eggplant, 16 percent have celeriac and one in ten have tackled an artichoke.

Young children eat more vegetables according to a new study, especially brightly colored vegetables such as carrots, peas, sweet corn and broccoli

Advertisements

Young children eat more vegetables according to a new study, especially brightly colored vegetables such as carrots, peas, sweet corn and broccoli

A third of parents (32 percent) say that their children will try every vegetable that is laid before them – more than the proportion (29 percent) that say they have trouble getting their offspring to eat their vegetables.

Brightly colored vegetables such as carrots, peas, sweet corn and broccoli are the most popular, the research was found for frozen food company Birds Eye, followed by bell pepper, cauliflower and green beans. Some youngsters mention cabbage, spinach and even Brussels sprouts as their favorite.

Some youngsters mention cabbage, spinach and even Brussels sprouts as their favorite

Some youngsters mention cabbage, spinach and even Brussels sprouts as their favorite

Some youngsters mention cabbage, spinach and even Brussels sprouts as their favorite

More than two-thirds (67 percent) of parents said it was easier to persuade children to try new food when the family sat down to eat.

Dr. Elizabeth Kilbey, a clinical psychologist and star of Channel 4's The Secret Life Of 4, 5 and 6 Years, said: "It is no surprise that children become more adventurous with the vegetables they eat. Eating healthy has become a big part of popular culture.

Advertisements

"Children learn through observation and are strongly influenced by what they see adults doing around them.

"We know that if parents have a varied diet and an adventurous approach to eating, this probably rubs their children."

However, a significant proportion of parents still struggle with young people who are picky about their food.

Almost a quarter (23 percent) said their children avoid certain food colors and more than a third (34 percent) admit that they serve the same small menu of dishes every week.

To encourage fruit and vegetable consumption, 31 percent of parents misled their offspring into believing they ate it before, nearly a quarter (24 percent) used bribes of extra time for computers or TV and 12 percent offered extra pocket money .

Advertisements

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) health