WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Chicago police say they will NO LONGER chase suspects who flee in certain cases as crime skyrockets

The Chicago Police Department has announced that it will stop pursuing fleeing suspects in certain cases as crime skyrockets in the Windy City.

The department announced the new policy at a news conference on Tuesday and said it will come into effect after “every officer has been trained,” Chief Inspector David Brown said.

“There are a few clarifications that officers need to know before we can hold them accountable,” Brown said Tuesday.

While he didn’t go into details about what officers needed clarification on, Brown emphasized that the new policy made it “safer” for its agents and “improves law enforcement to do their jobs.”

The inspector stressed that 25 officers had already been shot or fired at this year, and that the new foot pursuit policy would help eliminate potentially dangerous physical interactions with law enforcement officers and suspects, especially armed attackers.

Chief Inspector David Brown (pictured) announced Tuesday that the Chicago Police Department will soon update its foot pursuit policy to increase officer safety and better train officers.

Chief Inspector David Brown (pictured) announced Tuesday that the Chicago Police Department will soon update its foot pursuit policy to increase officer safety and better train officers.

The new policy outlines limited times when foot pursuit is allowed, as long as it outweighs the potential harm to an officer or endangers public safety.

One such case is when a suspect “commits a felony, a class A felony, [or a] traffic offenses that endanger the physical risks of others or when criminals have or are going to commit an ‘offense to be dealt with’.

Agents are permitted to prosecute suspects engaged in or about to engage in, among other things: battery, assault, unlawful use of weapons, and entering criminal residences.

However, the police must refrain from foot pursuit in the case of: public drink, land encroachments and simple assault, the policy read.

Law enforcement officers will need to have a reasonable suspicion that they are committing a crime that endangers the public before pursuing the suspect on foot.

Officers may pursue a suspect on foot if they are going to commit a misdemeanor or class A misdemeanor, including assault, assault and domestic crime, the policy reads (pictured)

Officers may pursue a suspect on foot if they are going to commit a misdemeanor or class A misdemeanor, including assault, assault and domestic crime, the policy reads (pictured)

“The safety of our community members and our officers remains at the heart of this new foot-chase policy,” Brown said at a news conference on Tuesday.

Crime in the city has increased by 34 percent this year. Theft, burglary and robbery all increased significantly at 65, 31 and 21 percent, respectively.

Brown said the new policy, as radical as it may seem, is actually not new to law enforcement, just new to Chicago.

“There are many departments that have policies to prosecute on foot and new policies are being introduced from other departments,” he said, though he did not specify which departments he based the new policy on. “There is a lot of data available to inform us about what foot pursuit is doing.”

Brown said there are two things the search policy does to help law enforcement. One benefit is ‘help keep officers safe’ and help the department ‘train officers’.

‘At the end [of a foot pursuit]There is, of course, a lot of physicality between the suspects and officers. Once you’re chasing someone, you now have to take them into custody, so often that leads to a lot of physicality. Officers are injured, suspects are injured, innocent bystanders are injured,” he said.

Crime is up 34 percent in Chicago compared to the same time last year

Crime is up 34 percent in Chicago compared to the same time last year

He still said “officers” would make the final decision to pursue suspects, but the documentation provided after the chase will allow Chicago to educate its officers and learn how to stay safer, Brown said.

The announcement of the policy change comes after protests erupted across America following the deaths of 22-year-old Anthony Alvarez and 13-year-old Adam Toledo in shootings involving officers.

The shooting prompted police to review its pursuit policy, but Brown said on Tuesday the department has been discussing the policy for “years.”

Shootings are down 17 percent and homicides are down 11 percent, according to the Chicago PD.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More