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Nagashibay Zhusupov, 61, a hero-traitor in the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, has taken & # 39; his own life & # 39;

A hero-liquidator in the Chernobyl nuclear disaster & # 39; took his own life & # 39; after the HBO television drama had brought him back to tears and resurrected his anger when he was denied a state-funded flat.

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Nagashibay Zhusupov, 61, was forced to move him, his wife, and their five children to a grotty and cramped hostel dormitory when the government & # 39; refused & # 39; to give him one of the apartments that were offered to other veterans of the 1986 explosion.

In June, he fell off the roof of a five-story building in Aktobe, Kazakhstan, and was found dead on the scene.

His daughter Gaukhar, 25, said his suspected suicide came after Zhusupov's HBO series with & # 39; tears in his eyes & # 39; had watched because it brought painful memories of his sacrifice.

Nagashibay Zhusupov, 61, a hero-traitor in the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, has taken & # 39; his own life & # 39;

Nagashibay Zhusupov, 61, a hero-traitor in the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, has taken & # 39; his own life & # 39;

He (photo) was forced to move him, his wife and their five children to a grotty and cramped hostel dormitory when the government & # 39; refused & # 39; to give him one of the apartments offered to other veterans of the 1986 explosion

He (photo) was forced to move him, his wife and their five children to a grotty and cramped hostel dormitory when the government & # 39; refused & # 39; to give him one of the apartments offered to other veterans of the 1986 explosion

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He (photo) was forced to move him, his wife and their five children to a grotty and cramped hostel dormitory when the government & # 39; refused & # 39; to give him one of the apartments offered to other veterans of the 1986 explosion

Friends believe he killed himself because he felt ignored by the authorities despite having served as a liquidator in the blitzed reactor number four in Chernobyl after the 1986 explosion and later as a worker at the Soviet nuclear test site in Semipalatinsk .

Many Chernobyl veterans have been given housing and pensions increased by governments in former Soviet states of Ukraine, Russia, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, but Zhusupov felt & # 39; deceived & # 39 ;, friends say.

The one said: & # 39; He lived in poverty without a decent home. & # 39;

Bakitzhan Satov, the president of an organization representing Chernobyl liquidators who fights terrible pollution at the exploded power station, said Zhusupov was one of the first on the scene at blitzed reactor number four.

In June, the Chernobyl veteran (photo) fell off the roof of a five-story building in Aktobe, Kazakhstan, and was found dead on site

In June, the Chernobyl veteran (photo) fell off the roof of a five-story building in Aktobe, Kazakhstan, and was found dead on site

In June, the Chernobyl veteran (photo) fell off the roof of a five-story building in Aktobe, Kazakhstan, and was found dead on site

His daughter Gaukhar, 25, said his suspected suicide came after Zhusupov's HBO series with & # 39; tears in his eyes & # 39; had watched
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His daughter Gaukhar, 25, said his suspected suicide came after Zhusupov's HBO series with & # 39; tears in his eyes & # 39; had watched

His daughter Gaukhar, 25, said his suspected suicide came after Zhusupov's HBO series with & # 39; tears in his eyes & # 39; had watched

The hero was assigned a tight dormitory in a hostel, & # 39; too small & # 39; for himself and his wife and five children.

For years he had demanded the kind of state-supplied apartment that was assigned to other Chernobyl veterans, which he believed earned in exchange for his sacrifice.

But after ten years of waiting in a house watch, he noticed that his name was & # 39; deleted & # 39 ;, making him desperate.

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Satov said: & # 39; He complained to restore his place in the row for an apartment. The last time I saw him, he was sorry he couldn't get an apartment.

& # 39; I believe he jumped from a height into total despair, because he couldn't get a good home for years. & # 39;

Local media reports referring to friends have this theory about his & # 39; suicide & # 39; repeated.

The hero (right) was assigned a tight dormitory in a hostel, & # 39; too small & # 39; for himself and his wife and five children

The hero (right) was assigned a tight dormitory in a hostel, & # 39; too small & # 39; for himself and his wife and five children

The hero (right) was assigned a tight dormitory in a hostel, & # 39; too small & # 39; for himself and his wife and five children

Zhusupov was praised for his courage during the disaster, who saw him as one of the first to fight the effects of reactor 4
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Zhusupov was praised for his courage during the disaster, who saw him as one of the first to fight the effects of reactor 4

Zhusupov was praised for his courage during the disaster, who saw him as one of the first to fight the effects of reactor 4

His health was also affected by his work in Chernobyl, reports say.

He was tormented by frequent severe headaches and sudden collapse, and he has spent more and more time in the hospital.

His pension including invalidity benefits was £ 35 a week.

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In an interview before his death, Zhusupov said: & # 39; Nobody told us why they called us (to work in Chernobyl). At that time I was working as a tractor driver. & # 39;

He was nevertheless one of the first liquidators in the exploded reactor.

He said: & # 39; After Chernobyl my health deteriorated. & # 39; I also served at the Semipalatinsk test site. & # 39;

His daughter Gaukhar said: & We have all watched the Chernobyl series. My father looked and remembered with such pain all those moments they had to go through. There were tears in his eyes as he went to & # 39; Chernobyl & # 39; watched.

He was tormented by frequent severe headaches and sudden collapse, and he has spent more and more time in the hospital

He was tormented by frequent severe headaches and sudden collapse, and he has spent more and more time in the hospital

He was tormented by frequent severe headaches and sudden collapse, and he has spent more and more time in the hospital

She said: & # 39; My father received government support, but not the way he wanted.

& # 39; Dad had a dream to get an apartment from the state like other Chernobyl liquidators who sacrificed their health. But his dream remained a dream. & # 39;

Despite his problems, he always tried to help others and was full of & # 39; energy & # 39; playing with his grandchildren.

& # 39; We can't believe this happened to us and he won't come home again, & # 39; she said.

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Another Chernobyl veteran who met him on April 26, to commemorate the explosion, said that Zhusupov & # 39; heavily depressed & # 39; used to be.

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