Chennai, the sixth largest city in India in crisis, because of the drought millions of people no longer have water

India & # 39; s sixth largest city is almost completely out of the water after a drought, making lakes and reservoirs almost completely dry.

Water in Lake Chembarambakkam, which lies some 25 km from Chennai, has almost disappeared and three other reservoirs supplying the area have also shrunk.

Home and hotel faucets have dried up in the southern state of Tamil Nadu because of the acute water shortage caused by dry lakes and depleted groundwater.

Millions of people turn to water tankers and fill containers with water with hand pumps.

People stand in line for water troughs in the capital of the state of Chennai, with an estimated population of around 10 million.

Residents are waiting in the queue to fill containers filled with drinking water from a water tanker in Chennai yesterday

Residents are waiting in the queue to fill containers filled with drinking water from a water tanker in Chennai yesterday

A satellite image of Chembarambakkam lake in Chennai showing the amount of water during the drought

A satellite image of Chembarambakkam lake in Chennai showing the amount of water during the drought

A satellite image of Chembarambakkam lake in Chennai showing the amount of water during the drought

This image shows how much water the same lake had before the drought. The reservoir is said to have almost completely dried up

This image shows how much water the same lake had before the drought. The reservoir is said to have almost completely dried up

This image shows how much water the same lake had before the drought. The reservoir is said to have almost completely dried up

State Minister for Rural Development, S.P. Velumani, said last Wednesday that the drought last year followed a 62 percent fall in monsoon rains compared to 2017.

Some companies have asked employees to work from home. Some restaurants close early and do not even consider serving lunch if the water scarcity deteriorates.

Gauri Shankar, general manager of Hotel Deccan Plaza in Chennai, said two tankers bring water to the hotel every day from a city 60 kilometers away for 4,000 rupees (£ 44.89) each.

& # 39; Even a water tanker is hard to get in the city. We get our stock because we signed a contract with a supplier in September when the water taps started to dry out, & said Shankar.

Own tankers that supply water are inaccessible to many of those who live in the slums of Chennai. It is thought that around 820,000 live in these areas and cannot afford access to tankers, a report said.

Women get water from an opening made by residents on the dried up lake in Chennai

Women get water from an opening made by residents on the dried up lake in Chennai

Women get water from an opening made by residents on the dried up lake in Chennai

People waiting to fill their ships with drinking water from a water tanker in Chennai. The city has almost no water left

People waiting to fill their ships with drinking water from a water tanker in Chennai. The city has almost no water left

People waiting to fill their ships with drinking water from a water tanker in Chennai. The city has almost no water left

Only a quarter of Indian households have drinking water at home and 200,000 people die each year as a result of inadequate supply or water pollution, a 2011 report said.

Chennai is the sixth largest city in India and a major destination for medical tourism, and the state of Tamil Nadu is a car manufacturer.

Top elected official K. Palaniswami said the state has reduced groundwater resources and asked other states for reserve water until the monsoon rains in October.

Monsoons reach different parts of India at different times.

North and East India have experienced heat waves with temperatures rising to 48C (118F) amid a delayed monsoon.

At least 90 people have died as a result of heat stroke in the eastern state of Bihar since June, according to the state's disaster management department.

Birds rest by standing water in the dried-up puzhal reservoir on the outskirts of Chennai

Birds rest by standing water in the dried-up puzhal reservoir on the outskirts of Chennai

Birds rest by standing water in the dried-up puzhal reservoir on the outskirts of Chennai

Residents are standing around with plastic jars filled with drinking water at a distribution point in Chennai yesterday

Residents are standing around with plastic jars filled with drinking water at a distribution point in Chennai yesterday

Residents are standing around with plastic jars filled with drinking water at a distribution point in Chennai yesterday

This year's monsoon arrived a week later in the southern state of Kerala and began to move slowly to other parts of the country.

India is facing a 43 percent deficit in monsoon rains throughout the country due to the late arrival, according to the India Meteorological Department.

Meteorologists said the monsoon rains cover about two-thirds of the country in mid-June. However, they have now reached less than half that area.

But the progress of the monsoon is expected to increase in the coming 10 days.

Suresh Subburaman, a resident of Chennai and owner of the Nivis Kitchen hotel, has done his best to keep his business going under the circumstances.

He told CNN: & # 39; We are open and we work in one way or another. But we have a no-loss, no-gain situation. This is our only company. We have no other option. We have to implement it. & # 39;

& # 39; Water used to come home every day. Now we get it every three to four days. We keep the water in a small tank or plastic pots of 20 liters at home. & # 39;

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news