Cheerleader, accused of killing and burying her newborn baby, was "hallucinated." # 039; By pregnancy

Prosecutors say that Skylar Richardson went crazy when doctors revealed she was pregnant and told them she did not intend to have a child. Skylar is accused of killing and burying her newborn baby, which she delivered a few days after the graduation party (pictured in May 2017)

The Ohio cheerleader, accused of killing her newborn and burying her in the yard, was scared when doctors revealed she was pregnant, prosecutors said.

Skylar Richardson, then 18, told doctors in May 2017 that she did not intend to have a child just months before starting college, prosecutors said at a hearing on Tuesday.

Assistant Warren County prosecutor Kirsten Brandt said Skylar's reaction was so "extreme and exaggerated" that doctors said she needed to tell them if she was thinking of hurting her son.

Prosecutors say that Skylar Richardson went crazy when doctors revealed she was pregnant and told them she did not intend to have a child. Skylar is accused of killing and burying her newborn baby, which she delivered a few days after the graduation party (pictured in May 2017)

Prosecutors say that Skylar Richardson went crazy when doctors revealed she was pregnant and told them she did not intend to have a child. Skylar is accused of killing and burying her newborn baby, which she delivered a few days after the graduation party (pictured in May 2017)

Brandt also stated that the teenager did not return to his doctor for an ultrasound or blood test.

He said Skylar ignored his doctor's phone calls and "did nothing to prepare for this baby to come into the world."

When Skylar returned to see her doctor in July, she told him that she had freed her daughter in the middle of the night and buried her in the backyard.

Brandt claimed that the doctor called his friend to the Middletown Police Department, while another called the Carlisle police.

Skylar, who maintained that the baby was stillborn, was charged with aggravated murder, involuntary manslaughter, endangering children, tampering with evidence and serious abuse of a body in July 2017.

Charlie Rittgers, Skylar's lawyer, said the prosecution was "inventing" what really happened and said he was "angry" about how they described Skylar's reaction.

"It's not true that Skylar Richardson had no intention of having a baby," he told the Cincinnati Enquirer.

Skylar's lawyers told a completely different version of the facts, one in which her doctor was not at all concerned about the adolescent's reaction to her unplanned pregnancy.

Neal Schuett said it was not considered unusual that Skylar would cry after hearing that she was pregnant.

He said that his doctor made "generic statements about depression", but that he does it with other "young women in similar situations."

Prosecutors say Skylar's reaction was so "extreme and exaggerated" that doctors said he needed to tell them if he was thinking about hurting his son.

Prosecutors say Skylar's reaction was so "extreme and exaggerated" that doctors said he needed to tell them if he was thinking about hurting his son.

Prosecutors say Skylar's reaction was so "extreme and exaggerated" that doctors said he needed to tell them if he was thinking about hurting his son.

And the doctors at the office called Skylar because she was very advanced in her pregnancy and they wanted to control her.

Schuett said the doctor called his police friend because he did not know the protocol to report the child's death. He was not worried that Skylar might have hurt his son.

The judges who heard the case interrupted Schuett to point out details in the case he was bordering.

"It's not normal for someone to bury a child in the backyard," Judge Robert Hendrickson told him. & # 39; Why would not there be a reasonable suspicion here? & # 39;

Skylar has been awaiting trial while his defense team works to prevent prosecutors from presenting their doctor's testimony, citing the doctor-patient privilege.

Prosecutors say Skylar killed her newborn because she and her family wanted to keep their perfect image in their small Ohio community.

Prosecutors say Skylar killed her newborn because she and her family wanted to keep their perfect image in their small Ohio community.

Prosecutors say Skylar killed her newborn because she and her family wanted to keep their perfect image in their small Ohio community.

Currently, the 12th District Court of Appeals is hearing arguments from the prosecution and the defense, but it could take months for a resolution to be issued.

Skylar, now 19, is currently under modified house arrest. Both she and her parents skipped the hearing.

The prosecutors' lawsuit comes a few days after Skylar's family revealed they did not know she was pregnant and she was happy when she began to gain weight after fighting anorexia for years.

"If she had come to me and said she was pregnant, she would have said, 'Okay, it's not exactly in the cards, but we'll fix it,' Kim told the Cincinnati Enquirer.

"That would have been easier to treat than this eating disorder."

While Skylar was able to hide his disorder behind his bubbling personality, anorexia came to light after he almost fainted in a cheerleading competition.

Skylar, who was 16 at the time, saw several counselors as her weight continued to fluctuate, and she dropped to 90 pounds on her 5-foot-1 frame.

I can not describe it. When your child does not eat chewing gum or is worried about toothpaste and can not do anything about it, "Kim recalled.

Skylar's aunt, Vanessa, said the teenager "in no way, shape or form" seemed pregnant when they went on a spring break trip in her senior year.

"I was happy because I was like, Oh, she met this nice guy, she does not care what she looks like anymore, she does not care if it's getting thick," Vanessa told Cosmopolitan.

"I mean, the eating disorders were always horrible, so we were all like," Oh, yes! She is putting on weight. "

But the family said they were overjoyed when Skylar (pictured in December 2017) started gaining weight after struggling with anorexia for years.

But the family said they were overjoyed when Skylar (pictured in December 2017) started gaining weight after struggling with anorexia for years.

But the family said they were overjoyed when Skylar (pictured in December 2017) started gaining weight after struggling with anorexia for years.

Looking back at the picture of Skylar's prom, taken two days before giving birth, Vanessa said she can now see the pothole.

"We hate each other for that now," he said. "But at that moment, we just thought that she was eating well and did not get sick." She looked curvy and radiant.

But County Attorney David Fornshell, who has called himself "extraordinarily pro-life," painted a very different image of Skylar and his family, saying they were desperate to maintain their perfect image.

"Skylar and his family, particularly his mother, were quite obsessed with external appearances and how things seemed to the outside world," he told a news conference after the young man was charged.

You have a situation where, you know, she's a nice fresh graduate from high school. She was a cheerleader, she described a good girl for her lawyer.

"And I think that kind of perception is one that Skylar wanted to perpetuate and that his mother wanted to perpetuate."

Skylar's aunt, Vanessa, said the teenager "in no way, shape or form" seemed pregnant when they went on a spring break together in her senior year

Skylar's aunt, Vanessa, said the teenager "in no way, shape or form" seemed pregnant when they went on a spring break together in her senior year

Skylar's aunt, Vanessa, said the teenager "in no way, shape or form" seemed pregnant when they went on a spring break together in her senior year

It was also Fornshell who claimed that Skylar not only buried her dead baby, but also burned the body of the newborn girl.

Her story of a cheerleader guided by appearances that would kill, burn and bury her newborn immediately took off.

"Our lives changed completely that day," Kim said. & # 39; And now this is our new normality & # 39;

Often, the family is followed by people who obsessively follow the case and write about it for one of the two fan pages on Facebook.

Some call Sylar "baby killer" when they see her walking down the street. Others scream & # 39; Assassin! & # 39;

Since then, the family has had to place black curtains in the patio of their backyard. They often find cars parked outside their home. They are no longer welcome in your church.

Skylar's defense lawyers criticized prosecutors for "a false narrative" that sensationalized the case.

They say that the teenager did not kill her baby, and that an expert witness concluded that there were no signs of burns or trauma that would have caused the baby's death.

The case has become a sensation in the small town of Carlisle, Ohio, where people often follow Skylar, who is in modified house arrest, and take pictures of her for Facebook groups.

The case has become a sensation in the small town of Carlisle, Ohio, where people often follow Skylar, who is in modified house arrest, and take pictures of her for Facebook groups.

The case has become a sensation in the small town of Carlisle, Ohio, where people often follow Skylar, who is in modified house arrest, and take pictures of her for Facebook groups.

Skylar has been awaiting trial while his defense team works to prevent prosecutors from presenting his doctor's testimony, citing doctor-patient privilege

Skylar has been awaiting trial while his defense team works to prevent prosecutors from presenting his doctor's testimony, citing doctor-patient privilege

Skylar has been awaiting trial while his defense team works to prevent prosecutors from presenting his doctor's testimony, citing doctor-patient privilege

"What started as an 18-year-old high school girl who was scared and sad to have given birth to a dead baby whom she called Annabelle and then tell her doctor about the dead and the burial in the yard became something sinister and grotesque, "they said in a motion to move the trial.

A forensic expert who claimed that Annabelle had been burned retracted her claim. A second expert also confirmed that there were no signs of the baby being burned.

Prosecutors argued that the privilege does not apply in this case, but ultimately were overthrown and forced to delay the start of the trial without that crucial evidence.

While still awaiting trial, Skylar, who was scheduled to start at the University of Cincinnati in the fall of 2017, is living a life in abeyance.

And Kim is dreaming of the granddaughter he never came to appreciate.

"Now I would be a year old and walk," Kim said. "It's so hard to believe that I had a grandchild I never had."

.