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Heather Chilton, (left), was angry when her daughter Nevaeh, (right), was asked to sell lottery tickets for a prize including an AM-15 optically ready gun for her cheerleader team

A mother in Ohio is furious after her 7-year-old daughter was asked to sell lottery tickets for a semi-automatic pistol for her cheerleader.

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Heather Chilton was excited when her daughter Nevaeh joined the Junior Lions Cheer Team in New Richmond.

However, she was asked to participate in a fundraising campaign where the prize was an AM-15 optically ready rifle.

She said Fox 19 : & # 39; This is absurd. You let elementary children sell your AR-15. Why?.

& # 39; I very much doubt that something would happen to the gun, but say so. Suppose one of the children in high school got hold of him – got the AR-15 or AM-15 and shot a school with it, and I'm the one who sold the lottery ticket to his father? & # 39;

Heather Chilton, (left), was angry when her daughter Nevaeh, (right), was asked to sell lottery tickets for a prize including an AM-15 optically ready gun for her cheerleader team

Heather Chilton, (left), was angry when her daughter Nevaeh, (right), was asked to sell lottery tickets for a prize including an AM-15 optically ready gun for her cheerleader team

Chilton received a letter stating that the cheer team had sold five AM-15 lottery tickets and five gift-basket lottery tickets for $ 10 each to raise money for football and cheer programs & # 39; s
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Chilton received a letter stating that the cheer team had sold five AM-15 lottery tickets and five gift-basket lottery tickets for $ 10 each to raise money for football and cheer programs & # 39; s

Chilton received a letter stating that the cheer team had sold five AM-15 lottery tickets and five gift-basket lottery tickets for $ 10 each to raise money for football and cheer programs & # 39; s

Chilton said in July that she received an email saying that all cheer team members had to sell five AM-15 lottery tickets and five gift-basket lottery tickets for $ 10 each to raise money for the football and cheer program & # 39; s.

Chilton said she felt uncomfortable with young cheerleaders involved in an event where a prize would be a semi-automatic weapon for an unknown winner.

& # 39; I don't see them selling a kind of semi-automatic rifle if we have all those massive shootings that go from door to door.

& # 39; As I do this, I teach the girls to stand up for what they believe. This is something they don't have to worry about or are even close to. & # 39;

She said she expressed her concern to Robert Wooten, president of New Richmond Junior Lions Football Inc.

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He claimed that, although the competition is considering making changes next year, after four years of doing the same lottery with the same prize.

Wooten said he only received two complaints in the four years that they had the lottery.

He understands that people are worried because he is the father of five children.

He said he offered parents the option of not selling lottery tickets for the gun.

Chilton said she felt uncomfortable with young cheerleaders involved in an event where a prize would be a semi-automatic weapon for an unknown winner

Chilton said she felt uncomfortable with young cheerleaders involved in an event where a prize would be a semi-automatic weapon for an unknown winner

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Chilton said she felt uncomfortable with young cheerleaders involved in an event where a prize would be a semi-automatic weapon for an unknown winner

Heather Chilton said she expressed her concerns to Robert Wooten, president of New Richmond Junior Lions Football Inc.

Heather Chilton said she expressed her concerns to Robert Wooten, president of New Richmond Junior Lions Football Inc.

Heather Chilton said she expressed her concerns to Robert Wooten, president of New Richmond Junior Lions Football Inc.

& # 39; They are not mandatory. They are not required to participate in the gun lottery. We recommend it, & # 39; Wooten said.

& # 39; We only recommend it because the money we receive is clearly needed to continue to offer our community sports. & # 39;

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The president of the competition said the lottery winner must pass an FBI background check before they receive the gun.

Senator Senator from Indiana, Karen Tallian, said she is particularly concerned about the lottery, especially given the recent shootings.

Community members are also worried about weapons being promoted in such a way. Shown is an AM Optic Ready rifle

Community members are also worried about weapons being promoted in such a way. Shown is an AM Optic Ready rifle

Community members are also worried about weapons being promoted in such a way. Shown is an AM Optic Ready rifle

She said CBS New York: & # 39; Win an assault rifle, I can't believe we really do that. Do a shotgun, we don't need hand guns and AR-15 & # 39; s pushed into the community by the police. & # 39;

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Community members are also worried about weapons being promoted in such a way.

Resident Sandy Seagally said: & You hear about a shooting every day and the last are the six officers who were shot in Philadelphia. They were shot with an AR-15, I just think this is wrong. & # 39;

Authorities say more allegations are likely in the case of a Philadelphia man who was accused of shooting six police officers during a long distance last week.

Thirty-six-year-old Maurice Hill is accused of attempted murder, assault and other counts.

He is accused of shooting at officers who filed a drug order on Wednesday and then kept the police at bay while shooting from a building.

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