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Cheeky shopper who buys baby food in bulk in Sydney Chemist Warehouse, seen with names on tins

Bizarre moment when a shopper sees names and numbers written on baby food bottles in Chemist Warehouse – ‘before he leaves with a can’

  • An angry shopper claims that a man took orders for canned baby food
  • She filmed a man writing about cans while taking a call at the Sydney pharmacy
  • The images were taken Tuesday evening at the Chemist Warehouse on Castle Hill
  • The retailer has a limit of four cans per variety per customer, but stocks 18 brands

A Chemist Warehouse shopper claims that she saw a man write names and numbers on baby food cans before leaving the store with large amounts of the product.

On Tuesday evening, a video of a man was shared with charges of laying daigou at the pharmacy in Castle Hill, northwest Sydney.

She said it looked like he was taking orders.

“He was FaceTiming someone and it looks like the person on the other side gave him names and order numbers,” she wrote.

A video of a man was shared along with allegations of daigou storage at a Chemist Warehouse outlet on Castle Hill, northwest Sydney, on Tuesday night

An angry shopper claims she witnessed a man who wrote names and numbers on baby food cans before leaving the pharmacy with large amounts of the product

But when she confronted the staff in the store, she claimed they told her it wasn’t a problem.

Chemist Warehouse has a limit of four cans per variety of baby food,

The pharmacy giant stocks 18 different brands of the product online, which theoretically means that a customer can walk out of the store with 72 cans of the product without exceeding the purchase limits.

Chemist Warehouse declined to comment.

Chemist Warehouse has a limit of four cans per variety of baby food, but stocks 18 different brands of the product online

Chemist Warehouse has a limit of four cans per variety of baby food, but stocks 18 different brands of the product online

Chemist Warehouse has a limit of four cans per variety of baby food, but stocks 18 different brands of the product online

Earlier this week, the mastermind behind a baby food crime syndicate in Sydney pleaded guilty to storing milk powder and shipping it to China.

Lie Ke, 50, bought cans of formula for between $ 16 and $ 25 depending on the brand stolen from supermarkets and pharmacies in Sydney, the Central Coast and Newcastle by shoplifting teams operating between November 2017 and August 2018.

Detectives put a series of cameras under mats in shopping carts to see how Ke held a series of illegal exchanges with thieves in public areas, including parking garages and Bunnings stores.

Ke, who moved from China to Carlingford in western Sydney in 2001, used her connection to sell the cans in China for over $ 80 each.

A thief said she made about $ 4,000 a week for selling 50 to 100 containers of stolen milk powder a day to the syndicate leader, The Daily Telegraph reported.

Lie Ke (pictured left outside Burwood Local Court last year) pleaded guilty to storing milk powder and shipping to China

Lie Ke (pictured left outside Burwood Local Court last year) pleaded guilty to storing milk powder and shipping to China

Lie Ke (pictured left outside Burwood Local Court last year) pleaded guilty to storing milk powder and shipping to China

Demand for baby powder in China soared after batches were contaminated in 2008, killing six babies.

More than 54,000 babies were hospitalized.

Sellers have been shedding Australian supermarket shelves of milk powder to sell to Chinese customers for years, following a health fear surrounding Chinese product in 2008.

Supermarkets and drug stores were forced to introduce purchase limits to avoid customer supplies.

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