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A border collie named Chaser who gained international fame as & # 39; the smarter dog in the world & # 39; died on July 23
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A celebrated border collie named Chaser who & # 39; the smartest dog in the world & # 39; named for her impressive ability to recognize more than 1,000 nouns, died in her family's home in South Carolina.

Chaser died last week from natural causes in Spartanburg. She was 15 years old.

The owners of the dog, the Pilley family, announced the sad news of her death on one Facebook page dedicated to Chaser on Friday.

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A border collie named Chaser who gained international fame as & # 39; the smarter dog in the world & # 39; died on July 23

The 15-year-old (shown in June) died of natural causes

The 15-year-old (shown in June) died of natural causes

A border collie named Chaser who has gained international fame as & # 39; the smarter dog in the world & # 39; died on July 23. The 15-year-old (photo on the right in June) died of natural causes

Chaser's beloved owner, Dr. John Pilley (left), who had taught her more than 1,000 words, died in June 2018 at the age of 89

Chaser's beloved owner, Dr. John Pilley (left), who had taught her more than 1,000 words, died in June 2018 at the age of 89

Chaser's beloved owner, Dr. John Pilley (left), who had taught her more than 1,000 words, died in June 2018 at the age of 89

Chaser became a celebrity thanks to her ability to recognize the names of her 1,022 toys
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Chaser became a celebrity thanks to her ability to recognize the names of her 1,022 toys

Chaser became a celebrity thanks to her ability to recognize the names of her 1,022 toys

& # 39; We are extremely sad to report that on Tuesday, July 23, 2019, Pilley Chaser's family home got its wings and accompanied John Pilley for their next adventure, & # 39 ;, said the status update.

WHAT WORDS Did JAGER know?

Among her 1,022 words, Chaser was able to match the following words with toys in her collection:

Armadillo, Santa Claus, Sweet potatoPorpoise, DonutPooh Beer Purple Holey BallListerine, MosquitoMandarin, ZombieWolverine BoomerangJackrabbit, Come onGroovy Holy GrailBuoy clinkerPoltergeist, naughty, Liquid, feel hornVoyageur, Muscle man, Redneck Pheasant, Lamaze, Floozy

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At her last minute the smart dog was surrounded by her owners, who described her death as & # 39; peaceful, beautiful, quiet & # 39 ;.

According to the post, the long-in-the-tooth pooch went well recently, but her health took a dramatic turn a few weeks ago.

The beloved pet was placed next to the other deceased dogs of the family to rest and sprinkled her cemetery with the ashes of her deceased owner, Dr. John Pilley, who died of leukemia two weeks before his 90th birthday in June 2018.

Pilley, emeritus professor of psychology at Wofford College in Spartanburg, welcomed Chaser to his family in 2004 after receiving the puppy as a gift.

Six years later, he made international headlines after publishing a paper with a colleague in a British magazine, Behavioral Processes, about the unprecedented understanding of his border collie.

Chaser once appeared on the Today Show to show off her impressive skills
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Chaser once appeared on the Today Show to show off her impressive skills

Chaser once appeared on the Today Show to show off her impressive skills

She was also featured in a 60-minute episode with Anderson Cooper (photo)

She was also featured in a 60-minute episode with Anderson Cooper (photo)

She was also featured in a 60-minute episode with Anderson Cooper (photo)

Particularly by the time she turned three, Chaser had learned the names of her 1,022 toys by playing and repeating.

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In 2013 Dr. Pilley a bestseller book titled & # 39; Chaser: Unlocking the Genius or The Dog Who Knows Thousand Words & # 39; in which he described the process of teaching Chaser's human language.

When she was only weeks old, he introduced her into learning by including it in her actions; if he saw her get an item, he would say the word "fetch" until she associated that word with what she was doing.

When she was five months old, Chaser made her first conceptual breakthrough when she realized that her toys could each have individual names. Pilley would choose a toy, give it a name, and then show it to Chaser, using repetition, play, and prizes (many & # 39; good girls! & # 39;) Until she associated the toy with that word.

Dr. Pilley and his wife welcomed the border collie they called Chaser as a puppy in 2004

Dr. Pilley and his wife welcomed the border collie they called Chaser as a puppy in 2004

Dr. Pilley and his wife welcomed the border collie they called Chaser as a puppy in 2004

Pilley, emeritus professor of psychology at Wofford College (pictured with Chaser), published a bestseller book in 2013
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Pilley, emeritus professor of psychology at Wofford College (pictured with Chaser), published a bestseller book in 2013

Pilley's book described how he taught his dog English words

Pilley's book described how he taught his dog English words

Pilley, emeritus professor of psychology at Wofford College (pictured with Chaser, left), published a bestseller book in 2013 with details on how he taught his dog English words

Pilley used wages and repetitions to teach his dog the names of her toys

Pilley used wages and repetitions to teach his dog the names of her toys

Pilley used wages and repetitions to teach his dog the names of her toys

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Impressively she realized that the verbs she had learned – & # 39; retrieve & # 39 ;, & # 39; take & # 39 ;, & # 39; nose & # 39; – and the names of the objects had different meanings and could be combined in a number of ways to instruct her to do different things with different items.

In addition, she not only learned individual names for items, but she also learned that a noun, such as & # 39; toys & # 39 ;, & # 39; ball & # 39; or & # 39; stick & # 39 ;, is an umbrella term and can refer to many objects.

Her understanding of the names of her toys became so safe that if Pilley told her to get an item she had never heard of, she could exclude by exclusion – that is, choose the new toy from a group of known objects on Based on the fact it was the only one she didn't know. This shows a creative reasoning that scientists had never thought before that dogs could achieve this.

Amazingly, Pilley discovered that she was able to learn 10 words a day – the same as a nine-year-old child.

Chaser is depicted with one of Dr. Pilley & # 39; s daughters, Deb Pilley Bianchi, who was there when the dog last breathed her on July 23

Chaser is depicted with one of Dr. Pilley & # 39; s daughters, Deb Pilley Bianchi, who was there when the dog last breathed her on July 23

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Chaser is depicted with one of Dr. Pilley & # 39; s daughters, Deb Pilley Bianchi, who was there when the dog last breathed her on July 23

But since she also needed more repetition than a nine-year-old to understand the words, he decided to teach Chaser once or twice a day – the same as a toddler.

Chaser & # 39; s incredible story was often told over the years in news and magazine articles, as well as in TV segments.

She was a guest in the PBS show Nova ScienceNOW with Neil DeGrasse Tyson and was shown in a 60-minute episode with Anderson Cooper.

A bronze statue in honor of Chaser will be placed in front of the Children's Museum of the Upstate-Spartanburg by next spring.

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& # 39; Her story is not over yet and we need all of you to keep the light burning bright & # 39 ;, wrote the smart puppy family on Facebook.

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