Home Entertainment Charlotte Dawson’s seven-month-old son Jude is rushed to hospital for the second time after struggling to breathe, as he says the last 24 hours have been “scary”.

Charlotte Dawson’s seven-month-old son Jude is rushed to hospital for the second time after struggling to breathe, as he says the last 24 hours have been “scary”.

by Merry
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Charlotte Dawson has revealed that her seven-month-old son Jude has been hospitalized with bronchitis for the second time.

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Charlotte Dawson has revealed that her seven-month-old son Jude has been hospitalized with bronchitis for the second time.

The reality star, 31, described the last 24 hours as “scary and crazy” as her son struggled to breathe due to the lung infection.

Bronchiolitis is a common lung infection in young children and babies. It causes swelling and irritation in the airways of the lung.

On Instagram, Charlotte said: ‘Oh guys, it’s been a crazy scary 24 hours again, with the little monkey, my little cherub.

‘We are back in the hospital. It’s like deja vu, isn’t it? With his bronchitis again.

But this time he doesn’t need oxygen. Obviously he can fight much better than when he was seven weeks old.

Charlotte Dawson has revealed that her seven-month-old son Jude has been hospitalized with bronchitis for the second time.

Charlotte Dawson has revealed that her seven-month-old son Jude has been hospitalized with bronchitis for the second time.

The reality star, 31, described the last 24 hours as “scary and crazy” as her son struggled to breathe.

“Now he is seven months old, he has a lot of chest, so we had to stay in the hospital because of his breathing, his temperature was very high.

“It’s been really scary again, but I’m so happy that I can fight it better than when I was a baby, but it’s crazy that I’ve had it again.”

Charlotte later took to Instagram to share a video of Jude and wrote: “Thank you for all your messages, love you all, thank God he’s recovering… just can’t believe he’s had it so scary again, But I’m very glad we went.” hospital. I’m exhausted, I haven’t barely slept.’

Jude was only seven weeks old when he first got bronchitis and almost died.

Charlotte had initially dismissed it as a cold, but rushed him to hospital after realizing something was terribly wrong when he had difficulty breathing and changed colour.

Jude was then put on oxygen for six days and doctors told him he “would have died” if he had returned a day later.

The star said in December in an interview with Closer: “It was so scary. He wasn’t feeding and his breathing slowed down and he couldn’t catch his breath. “Suddenly the color changed on him, he became very grey.

“They saw him and immediately said, ‘Thank God they brought him in now, because he would have died if it had been 24 hours later.'” I was in complete shock.

“When they hooked him up to the machines it was heartbreaking. He made me realize what life is about and put everything into perspective. If something had happened to Jude, I don’t know what he would have done. He is our little miracle.

Charlotte later took to Instagram to share a video of Jude, writing: “Thank you for all your messages, love you all, thank God he’s getting better.”

At the time of the hospital run in October, she shared how grateful she was to have trusted her instincts after an initial doctor turned them away thinking it was just a cold.

Charlotte posted a photo of herself cradling her little one close to her chest and holding his hand.

She captioned the post: ‘Trust your maternal instinct. I may have been absolutely exhausted, but I knew something wasn’t right and it wasn’t.

‘Our beautiful boy has RSV bronchitis after saying he had a cold to go home and rest from the doctors.

“Thank God we went to the hospital at the right time and the nurses and doctors were amazing, they gave him oxygen and we will be here until next week, but we are in the right place and in good hands.

“Thank you for all your messages, I love you all, I just have to focus on him getting better now, it’s so scary when they’re so little and seeing him with all these tubes I don’t want to let go.”

According to the National Health ServiceBronchiolitis is caused by a viral infection, usually respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

RSV is very common and is easily transmitted by coughing and sneezing. Almost all children have suffered from it by the time they are two years old.

WHAT IS BRONCHIOLITIS? AND WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract infection that affects infants and children under two years of age.

Most cases go away within two to three weeks without treatment.

However, some babies suffer severe symptoms that require treatment in the hospital.

The first symptoms are similar to those of a cold, such as a runny nose or cough. In the coming days, these may become:

  • Fever
  • Dry and persistent cough
  • labored breathing
  • wheezing

Parents should contact their GP or NHS 111 if their child has eaten less than usual for the last few feedings or has had a dry nappy for 12 hours.

A persistent temperature of 38°C or higher and a child who seems tired or irritable may also be cause for concern.

Parents should call 999 if their child has difficulty breathing, a blue tongue or lips, or if there are long pauses between breaths.

Bronchiolitis is caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which is transmitted through small droplets expelled when an infected person sneezes or coughs.

This causes the small airways in the lungs to become inflamed, reducing the amount of air that can enter them.

Approximately one in three children becomes infected during the first year of their life. By two years, almost all children will have been infected, of which about half will develop bronchiolitis.

There is no medication that eliminates RSV, but treatment is generally not required.

Only two to three percent of babies need to be hospitalized due to bronchiolitis.

If a child becomes infected, parents should make sure the child stays hydrated and give pain medication if necessary.

Bronchiolitis is difficult to prevent, but the following may help:

  • Wash your hands and your child’s hands frequently
  • Wash or wipe toys and surfaces regularly.
  • Keep newborns away from people with colds or the flu.
  • Keep infected children home until their symptoms disappear.
  • Do not expose your child to smoke

Fountain: NHS options

Charlotte Dawson Instagram

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