Central American migrants in Mexico want buses to the American border

Central American migrants in a caravan stopped in Mexico City demanded buses on Thursday to take them to the US border, saying they were too cold and dangerous to keep walking and hitchhiking.

About 200 migrants, representing the approximately 5,000 people living in a stadium in the south of the capital of Mexico, marched to the United Nations office in Mexico City to make the demand for transport.

The office was closed when the migrants arrived, but a dozen were received by UN representatives at a nearby location, said Ilberto Sosa Montes, a 45-year-old Honduran who is a member of the caravan coordinators.

& # 39; We need buses to travel further & # 39 ;, said Milton Benitez, caravan coordinator. Benitez noted that it would be colder in northern Mexico and it was not safe for migrants to continue along motorways, where drug cartels often operate.

& # 39; This is a humanitarian crisis and they ignore it, & # 39; said Benitez when the group arrived at the UN office.

Central American migrants in a caravan that stopped in Mexico City demanded buses to the American border on Thursday. Scores of Central American migrants take a march on Thursday morning to the office of the UN human rights body

Central American migrants in a caravan that stopped in Mexico City demanded buses to the American border on Thursday. Scores of Central American migrants take a march on Thursday morning to the office of the UN human rights body

Approximately 85 percent of migrants come from Honduras, others come from the Central American countries of Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua

Approximately 85 percent of migrants come from Honduras, others come from the Central American countries of Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua

Approximately 85 percent of migrants come from Honduras, others come from the Central American countries of Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua

Members of the caravan who stopped in Mexico City demanded that buses take them to the border with the United States, and said it was too cold and dangerous to continue walking and hitchhiking.

Members of the caravan who stopped in Mexico City demanded that buses take them to the border with the United States, and said it was too cold and dangerous to continue walking and hitchhiking.

Members of the caravan who stopped in Mexico City demanded that buses take them to the border with the United States, and said it was too cold and dangerous to continue walking and hitchhiking.

The authorities of Mexico City say that of the 4,841 registered migrants who are accommodated in a sports complex, 1,726 are younger than 18, including 310 children younger than 5

The authorities of Mexico City say that of the 4,841 registered migrants who are accommodated in a sports complex, 1,726 are younger than 18, including 310 children younger than 5

The authorities of Mexico City say that of the 4,841 registered migrants who are accommodated in a sports complex, 1,726 are younger than 18, including 310 children younger than 5

A man rests on the street after dozens of Central American migrants representing the thousands who participate in a caravan trying to reach the US border Thursday

A man rests on the street after dozens of Central American migrants representing the thousands who participate in a caravan trying to reach the US border Thursday

A man rests on the street after dozens of Central American migrants representing the thousands who participate in a caravan trying to reach the US border Thursday

The plan was that when the migrant mission returned to the stadium, about three hours walking from the UN office, the migrants met at a meeting to decide when they would leave Mexico City and which route they would take to the border with the United States. States.

But the meeting with UN officials continued Thursday evening, confirming representatives from the UN and the caravan.

The Mexico City authorities say that of the 4,841 registered migrants who are accommodated in a sports complex, 1,726 are younger than 18, including 310 children under five.

The Mexican government has said that most migrants have refused offers to stay in Mexico, and only a small number have agreed to return to their home country.

Approximately 85 percent of migrants come from Honduras, while others come from the Central American countries of Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua.

California is the longest route, but it is the best border, while Texas is the closest, but the worst & # 39; border, said Jose Luis Fuentes of the National Lawyers Guild to collect migrants.

There have already been reports that migrants have disappeared on the caravan, but that is often because they drive on trucks that turn off on different routes, causing them to be lost.

However, the UN Human Rights Agency said that its office in Mexico had filed a police report with prosecutors in the central state of Puebla about two buses that were taken by migrants in the last stage of the trip to Mexico City at the beginning of this week. and whose whereabouts are unknown.

Mexico City itself is more than 600 miles from the nearest US border crossing at McAllen, Texas, and a previous caravan in spring opted for a much longer route to Tijuana in the far northwest, across from San Diego.

That caravan steadily walked away to only 200 people by the time he reached the border.

Activists and officials explained the options available to migrants in Mexico who offered them flight, asylum or work visas.

The government said that 2,697 temporary visas have been issued to individuals and families to cover them while waiting for the 45-day application process for a more permanent status.

The Thursday meeting with representatives from the UN comes two days after the US mid-term election, in which President Donald Trump had turned migrants into a campaign issue, portraying them as a major threat.

Marlon Ivan Mendez, a farm worker from Copan, Honduras, waited in line for donated shoes to replace the worn crocodiles he had used since his departure from his country three weeks ago. He said he had left because gangs hired him to live in his own house.

A man rests his feet after dozens of Central American migrants, representing the thousands who participate in a caravan trying to reach the US border, have taken a march for hours to the office of the United Nations human rights body in Mexico City, Thursday

A man rests his feet after dozens of Central American migrants, representing the thousands who participate in a caravan trying to reach the US border, have taken a march for hours to the office of the United Nations human rights body in Mexico City, Thursday

A man rests his feet after dozens of Central American migrants, representing the thousands who participate in a caravan trying to reach the US border, have taken a march for hours to the office of the United Nations human rights body in Mexico City, Thursday

A migrant is resting on the street after dozens of Central American migrants in Mexico City, Thursday

A migrant is resting on the street after dozens of Central American migrants in Mexico City, Thursday

A migrant is resting on the street after dozens of Central American migrants in Mexico City, Thursday

Men are preparing for donated drinking water, after dozens of Central American migrants, representing the thousands who participate in a caravan trying to reach the American border

Men are preparing for donated drinking water, after dozens of Central American migrants, representing the thousands who participate in a caravan trying to reach the American border

Men are preparing for donated drinking water, after dozens of Central American migrants, representing the thousands who participate in a caravan trying to reach the American border

& # 39; It is not fair that the good pay for the sinners, & # 39; Mendez said about the fear that gang members are coming with the caravan.

Christopher Gascon, Mexico's representative for the International Organization for Migration, estimates that there may be another 4,000 in caravans that make their way through Southern Mexico.

But some migrants had visited the organization's tent with the question of how they could return home.

On Wednesday evening a bus left Mexico City to send 37 people back to their country of origin.

In the stadium, hundreds of Mexico City employees and even more volunteers helped sort donations and migrate food, water, diapers and other basics directly. Migrants searched through piles of clothes and grabbed boxes of milk for children.

Darwin Pereira, a 23-year-old construction worker from Olanchito, Honduras, left his country with his wife and son, 4, for the very simple reason that & # 39; there is no work & # 39 ;.

Pereira, who still wears the same cheap plastic sandals as he left with Honduras a month ago, thought about what he would do if he met the US president.

& # 39; When I meet Donald Trump, I'm going to cry. I will cry because there is nothing else to do, "he said.

US Army Military Police of Fort Bliss Texas will be seen at San Ysidro harbor on November 6 to support the Border Patrol after President Trump said he is afraid of an invasion of Hondurans arriving in the coming weeks

US Army Military Police of Fort Bliss Texas will be seen at San Ysidro harbor on November 6 to support the Border Patrol after President Trump said he is afraid of an invasion of Hondurans arriving in the coming weeks

US Army Military Police of Fort Bliss Texas will be seen at San Ysidro harbor on November 6 to support the Border Patrol after President Trump said he is afraid of an invasion of Hondurans arriving in the coming weeks

Marine Corps engineers at Camp Pendleton set up razord council just east of the San Ysidro port of entry, where trains from the US to Mexico and Mexico to the US to support Border Patrol after President Trump said he feared invasion of Honduran coming weeks

Marine Corps engineers at Camp Pendleton set up razord council just east of the San Ysidro port of entry, where trains from the US to Mexico and Mexico to the US to support Border Patrol after President Trump said he feared invasion of Honduran coming weeks

Marine Corps engineers at Camp Pendleton set up razord council just east of the San Ysidro port of entry, where trains from the US to Mexico and Mexico to the US to support Border Patrol after President Trump said he feared invasion of Honduran coming weeks

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