Celebrity chef Adam Liaw shares the five-ingredient ricotta donut he enjoys

Famed chef Adam Liaw has unveiled his easy-to-follow recipe for ricotta donuts — a snack he loves to enjoy at the daily Covid press conference.

The 2010 MasterChef Australia winner serves the donut ball next to a long black orb before tuning into the 11am conference each day.

The recipe calls for self-raising flour, ricotta, baking powder, caster sugar, and two eggs.

Famed chef Adam Liaw has unveiled his easy-to-follow recipe for ricotta donuts — a snack he loves to enjoy at daily Covid press conference

‘Just mix and let it rest in the fridge for 30 minutes before frying at 160C for about four minutes,’ he captioned a photo of the morning tea.

He serves the donut balls sprinkled with chai sugar.

The morning tea idea proved popular with more than 6,000 people who responded to the post shared on Wednesday.

How can I make ricotta donuts?

INGREDIENTS

½ tsp baking powder

1 tbsp caster sugar

2 eggs

100 g self-raising flour

200 g smooth ricotta

METHOD

Simply mix together and let it rest in the fridge for 30 minutes before frying at 160C for about 4 minutes.

The popular celebrity chef also recently shared his tips and tricks for including leftovers in a second meal.

Adam said he usually orders his family’s pizzas for dinner so that there are leftovers for breakfast or lunch the next day.

And the cookbook author revealed other leftover takeaways that can be reheated, revived, or turned into a whole new dish — including soggy chips, steamed rice, naan bread, and even roasted chicken bones.

2010 MasterChef Australia winner serves the donut ball next to a long black orb before tuning into the 11am conference each day

2010 MasterChef Australia winner serves the donut ball next to a long black orb before tuning into the 11am conference each day

SOGGY CHIPS

To save soggy fries, the food writer said the best and fastest solution was to “stir-fry” them in a quarter cup of vegetable oil.

In a wok or frying pan, stir-fry the chips until crispy, golden brown and crispy.

“You’ll have to season them with a little more salt afterward, but they’ll be almost as good as freshly baked,” Liaw said. Good food.

STEAMED RICE

When ordering Chinese or Thai food, he suggested to get extra steamed rice.

“A few leftover servings of steamed rice form the basis for fried rice the next day, with day-old refrigerated rice being key,” he said.

NAANBREAD

Liaw said naan bread “freezes exceptionally well,” so it’s always helpful to order extra so you can serve your own homemade curry on the go.

To reheat naan breads, he suggested greasing them with melted butter and placing them in a skillet or on a barbecue.

ROAST CHICKEN

He said leftover roast chicken bones can be used to make a tasty stock, while leftover garlic bread can be turned into chicken stuffing.

SAUCES

And if you have leftover sauces, like McDonald’s iconic Sweet ‘N Sour, Liaw suggested saving them so you can serve them with homemade or frozen chicken nuggets.

“Young kids will be really ecstatic,” he said.

His tips come after Liaw offers his guide to home cooking – including meal planning, easy ingredient changes, and using leftovers to avoid food waste.

The food writer said you can replace a missing ingredient in your dish with other alternatives so you don’t have to go back to the supermarket – as millions of Australians stay at home to minimize the risk of spreading the coronavirus.

Whether you need a sweet, salty or sour ingredient, Liaw said you can recreate the flavors just from what you already have in the pantry.

‘If you don’t have sugar, use honey. If you run out of soy sauce, use a little salt. No lemon juice? Try vinegar instead,” Liaw said in an article for The Good Food.

Rather than stockpiling, Liaw said the best way to stretch the ingredients further is to “throw less away.”

“If you have some leftover veggies, cut them up and throw them in that quarantine bolognese. Turn bones and trimmings into broth,” he said.

Liaw encouraged people to ignore the use-by date and expiration date — and instead use your nose to check if the product is no longer good.

Three ingredients every household should always have in their pantry

Adam Liaw revealed the ingredients every household should always have in the pantry amid the coronavirus — including dried mushrooms, polenta and eggs.

liaw said: dried mushrooms should always be a staple in your pantry.

“They add a good dose of umami and a meaty texture to dishes, and when you reconstitute them in water, you get an instant mushroom broth,” he told Good Food.

For vegetarians or vegans, Liaw said dried shiitake is perfect for grating over pasta dishes.

Liaw suggested keeping a few dozen Eggs in the pantry if you do find yourself in isolation, because you can make various savory or sweet dishes such as fried rice, cake, omelette, boiled or scrambled eggs and even mayonnaise.

“Eggs are arguably the most versatile food in the world,” he said.

Another ingredient he suggested is: polenta, describing it as a “highly underrated apocalypse food.”

“What I love about it is that it’s a different meal every day,” Liaw said, adding that polenta can be served as hot porridge, baked, baked, or grilled.

According to Australia and New Zealand food standards, most foods are safe to consume after their best before date, but they may have lost some quality.

Liaw said there are two different smells to avoid if you’re looking for food that’s just past its best-before or best-before date.

‘The first is putrefaction – the sour, disgusting and quite unmistakable smell of something that has gone off. Avoid,’ he said.

“The second is rancidity. Rancid, oxidized oils have a waxy odor and while they may not make you sick right away, they can taste unpleasant.’

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