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CDC report reveals that coronavirus spreads to 72% of detainees in Louisiana

A new report from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that one coronavirus test may not be enough to make sure someone is not infected after exposure.

The report, published Monday, found that more than 70 percent of prisoners in a Louisiana prison exposed to someone infected with coronavirus eventually got COVID-19.

But about 25 percent of them tested negative once or even twice between exposure and achieving a positive result.

As the threat of asymptomatic proliferation becomes apparent and outbreaks are raging in US detention centers, the CDC underlines the need to conduct ‘serial’ diagnostic tests, especially among those exposed to someone with coronavirus and people living in tightly packed group environments .

It’s also because San Quentin Prison in California revealed that more than 1,000 of its prisoners have been infected.

Coronavirus has spread like wildfire in U.S. prisons, including one in Louisiana, where 72% of prisoners in dorms where someone was infected contracted the virus despite more intensive disinfection measures and quarantines (file)

Coronavirus has spread like wildfire in U.S. prisons, including one in Louisiana, where 72% of prisoners in dorms where someone was infected contracted the virus despite more intensive disinfection measures and quarantines (file)

U.S. prisons, where overcrowding is a common problem, have become hotbeds for the spread of coronavirus.

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is a highly contagious pathogen, much more so than its cousins ​​in the coronavirus family, SARS and MERS.

It likes nothing more than crowds in confined spaces, making prisons perfect food for the spread of coronavirus.

On March 29, an employee of a Louisiana prison (whom the CDC does not name) developed symptoms of the coronavirus.

Shortly after, the person tested positive for COVID-19.

Within a few days, two more facility employees and a first prisoner tested positive.

There were 700 prisoners in the entire prison complex, spread over 15 dormitories.

For the following month, prison staff performed daily temperature and blood oxygen level screening of the prisoners, which led to the diagnosis of 35 prisoners across five dormitories between April 8 and May 7.

The 98 prisoners were tested for coronavirus daily and 16 times negative once and twice negative before finally being diagnosed with COVID-19 (file)

The 98 prisoners were tested for coronavirus daily and 16 times negative once and twice negative before finally being diagnosed with COVID-19 (file)

The 98 prisoners were tested for coronavirus daily and 16 times negative once and twice negative before finally being diagnosed with COVID-19 (file)

Anyone who tested positive was transferred for treatment, and the 98 remaining prisoners in those dorms were quarantined.

Then the Louisiana Department of Health and the CDC came in to begin full screening on May 7.

On the first day, 53 people already tested positive.

Health officials continued to test the prisoners for two weeks. By the end of that period, 71 people tested positive, meaning the virus spread to 72 percent of people who shared a building with the original 35 infected prisoners.

Sixteen of those people tested negative once before finally testing positive and two tested negative twice before confirming their cases.

Nearly half of the prisoners (45 percent) said they had no symptoms when testing.

The high rate of seizures within these five dormitories and the high number of asymptomatic individuals with SARS-CoV-2 infection suggest that serial tests of close contacts, including those in municipal settings, should begin immediately after a case is identified to continue transmission. limit, “the authors of the CDC report wrote.

“Some individuals infected with SARS-CoV-2 were likely detected only weeks after they were infected, which could have contributed to rapid transmission within quarantined dormitories.”

According to Politicallyat least 1,327 prisoners in federal prisons were covid positive on June 20. Another 5,000 were infected and recovered and 98 died.

The CDC report highlights how easily the coronavirus can spread in the confined spaces of prisons, even if rapid action is taken to isolate infected people.

But it also has consequences outside the prison walls.

“High COVID-19 broadcasts in correctional and detention centers also have the potential to affect wider community transmission,” the CDC report says.

“Reducing transmission in correctional and detention centers may also reduce transmission in communities where personnel reside and where detainees return when released.”

REVEAL: More than 1,000 prisoners in San Quentin Prison in California now have coronavirus

More than 1,000 inmates at San Quentin Prison in California have tested positive for coronavirus, meaning more than a third of the facility’s entire population has the virus.

The number rose from 823 on Sunday to 1,015 on Monday, an increase of 22 percent. There have been 973 new cases in prison in the past 14 days.

The prison now has by far the highest number of cases of any correctional facility in California.

Last week, 30 of the cases were prison staff and five infected prisoners were released.

More than 1,000 inmates at California's San Quentin prison have tested positive for coronavirus, meaning more than a third of the facility's entire population now has the virus

More than 1,000 inmates at California's San Quentin prison have tested positive for coronavirus, meaning more than a third of the facility's entire population now has the virus

More than 1,000 inmates at California’s San Quentin prison have tested positive for coronavirus, meaning more than a third of the facility’s entire population now has the virus

This is how things have increased in California's prison system since early May.  The blue line represents the prison system compared to the rest of the state and the country

This is how things have increased in California's prison system since early May.  The blue line represents the prison system compared to the rest of the state and the country

This is how things have increased in California’s prison system since early May. The blue line represents the prison system compared to the rest of the state and the country

It is unclear where they were released and whether they were forced to quarantine after leaving custody.

San Francisco Gate reports that the infections worsened a month ago when 121 California Institute for Men prisoners were transferred to Chino.

Those infected prisoners were not sufficiently separated from others on arrival and quickly spread the virus.

It also comes amid a wave of testing in the prison system.

However, the peak in cases is not reflected in a peak in deaths.

The increase in the prison system reflects the continuing increase in cases across the state and the rest of the country that raise concerns that a new closure may be necessary.

Governor Gavin Newsom has ordered nightlife to shut down amid increasing numbers.

Florida, Arizona and Texas are also seeing worrying increases in business.

Newsom announced at a news conference on Monday that some prisoners and guards could be taken to a medical center to be cared for.

Prisons have been a concern since the start of the pandemic, with hundreds of prisoners sitting close together who had no choice but to live on top of each other.

It led many leaders to start releasing what they considered to be non-violent criminals from custody.

No COVID-19 deaths have occurred in prison, while 16 California Institute for Men inmates have died from the virus.

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