CBS This morning, Norah O & # 39; Donnell hosts a recovery after an emergency operation to remove appendix

CBS This morning hostess Norah O & # 39; Donnell recovers after receiving an emergency supplement.

The 45-year-old shared a photo on Instagram from her hospital room at the South Carolina Medical University in Charleston and gave a thumbs up and thanked fans for their sincere wishes.

& # 39; I'm feeling much better and hope to return to NYC later this week if I feel good enough to fly & # 39 ;, the mother of three wrote in the caption.

& # 39; Thank you for all kind texts and emails. I am an organ, but I have learned some valuable lessons this week. & # 39;

CBS This morning, Norah presented O & D # 39; Donnell, 45, photo on Instagram (photo) on Monday, while recovering from an emergency apoptosis at the South Carolina Medical University in Charleston

CBS This morning, Norah presented O & D # 39; Donnell, 45, photo on Instagram (photo) on Monday, while recovering from an emergency apoptosis at the South Carolina Medical University in Charleston

D & Donnell was on vacation with her husband, chef Geoff Tracy, when she was taken to hospital on Friday and diagnosed with appendix. Pictured: O & # 39; Donnell in the hospital

D & Donnell was on vacation with her husband, chef Geoff Tracy, when she was taken to hospital on Friday and diagnosed with appendix. Pictured: O & # 39; Donnell in the hospital

D & Donnell was on vacation with her husband, chef Geoff Tracy, when she was taken to hospital on Friday and diagnosed with appendix. Pictured: O & # 39; Donnell in the hospital

Blind appendicitis is an inflammation of the appendix, a finger-shaped pouch that is located at the place where the small and large intestine connect to the lower right side of the lower abdomen. Pictured: D & Donnell at the hospital

Blind appendicitis is an inflammation of the appendix, a finger-shaped pouch that is located at the place where the small and large intestine connect to the lower right side of the lower abdomen. Pictured: D & Donnell at the hospital

Blind appendicitis is an inflammation of the appendix, a finger-shaped pouch that is located at the place where the small and large intestine connect to the lower right side of the lower abdomen. Pictured: D & Donnell at the hospital

In the post, which has more than 9,000 likes, O & # 39; Donnell encouraged her followers to listen to their bodies.

& # 39; If you are in pain, go to a doctor. Do not wait [five] days as I ignored pain, & she wrote.

O & # 39; Donnell was on vacation with her husband, chef Geoff Tracy, in South Carolina when she was rushed to the hospital on Friday.

She shared a photo with her Instagram story in which she revealed that she had appendicitis.

This is an inflammation of the appendix, a finger-shaped pouch where the small and large intestines connect to the lower right side of the lower abdomen.

The photo shows O & # 39; Donnell dressed in a hospital coat in a bed with the caption: & # 39; Not what we were planning for the spring break & # 39 ;. She then shared a video from the point of view of her stretcher with the caption: & # 39; Towards an operation & # 39 ;.

A hospital spokeswoman confirmed DailyMail.com that the TV host had surgery on Friday and that she was fired later in the day.

Signs of appendicitis usually include lower right abdominal pain, pain around the navel, nausea, vomiting, fever and diarrhea.

According to Dr. Jonathan Kohler, assistant professor of surgery and pediatrics at UW-Madison, about seven percent of people will develop the condition at some point in their lives.

He told DailyMail.com that although it is one of the most common illnesses seen in the hospital, it is not well understood.

O & # 39; Donnell had a laparoscopic appendectomy, which is a minimally invasive operation, and was released the same day. Pictured, from left to right: Gayle King, Reba McEntire and O & # 39; Donnell on CBS This Morning in February 2019

O & # 39; Donnell had a laparoscopic appendectomy, which is a minimally invasive operation, and was released the same day. Pictured, from left to right: Gayle King, Reba McEntire and O & # 39; Donnell on CBS This Morning in February 2019

O & # 39; Donnell had a laparoscopic appendectomy, which is a minimally invasive operation, and was released the same day. Pictured, from left to right: Gayle King, Reba McEntire and O & # 39; Donnell on CBS This Morning in February 2019

In a post on Instagram, O & # 39; Donnell (photo, October 2018) said she feels better and hopes to return to New York later this week

In a post on Instagram, O & # 39; Donnell (photo, October 2018) said she feels better and hopes to return to New York later this week

O & # 39; Donnell (photo, October 2018) also urged her fans not to wait to get their pain checked like the five days she did

O & # 39; Donnell (photo, October 2018) also urged her fans not to wait to get their pain checked like the five days she did

In a post on Instagram, O & # 39; Donnell (left and right) said she feels better and hopes to return to New York later this week. She also urged her fans not to wait to get their pain checked like the five days she did

"We can't predict who gets it, we don't know enough about the microorganisms involved," he said.

Dr. Kohler said there is a misconception that if the appendix is ​​inflamed, it is like a balloon that gets bigger and bigger until it pops up.

& # 39; It is more correct to say that it is rotten like banana, & # 39; he said. & # 39; It does not explode, but the wall of the appendix becomes infected so that it becomes necrotic and enters the abdomen. & # 39;

However, he warns that there are risks of not having surgery if you have a severe case of appendicitis.

& # 39; It can perforate, meaning that you can get a hole in the wall of the appendix and that the infection that is trapped can come out and cause sepsis. & # 39;

There are two types of operations to remove the appendix. The first is an open appendix surgery, where an incision of two to four inches is made in the right abdomen to remove the appendix.

The second is a laparoscopic appendix, the type that D & Donnell had performed on her.

It's about making one to three small incisions. A laparoscope, a thin tube with a video camera and surgical tools are placed in one of the incisions and the surgeon uses a TV monitor to guide the tube and remove the appendix.

Most patients go home the same day as the operation.

Experts say that waiting to be checked for appendicitis can lead to an opening in the wall of the appendix and the infection can spread in the abdomen

Experts say that waiting to be checked for appendicitis can lead to an opening in the wall of the appendix and the infection can spread in the abdomen

Experts say that waiting to be checked for appendicitis can lead to an opening in the wall of the appendix and the infection can spread in the abdomen

Some studies have suggested using antibiotics as the first course of treatment for appendicitis instead of surgery, but there is a 40 percent chance of recurrence after five years. Shown: D & Donnell in October 2018

Some studies have suggested using antibiotics as the first course of treatment for appendicitis instead of surgery, but there is a 40 percent chance of recurrence after five years. Shown: D & Donnell in October 2018

Some studies have suggested using antibiotics as the first course of treatment for appendicitis instead of surgery, but there is a 40 percent chance of recurrence after five years. Shown: D & Donnell in October 2018

Some studies have suggested using antibiotics as the first course of treatment for appendicitis instead of surgery.

Dr. However, Joaquin Havens, a surgeon with the Trauma, Burn and Surgical Care group in Brigham and the Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, says that patients have a 40 percent chance of relapse within five years.

& # 39; With those odds, the recommendation is to surgically remove the appendix & # 39 ;, he told DailyMail.com.

Both doctors insisted that any patient experiencing persistent stomach pain should seek medical attention immediately.

& # 39; If you have persistent abdominal pain, which means it doesn't get better, usually if it is accompanied by fever, nausea or diarrhea, have it checked, & # 39; said Dr. Kohler.

& # 39; There are few benign causes of abdominal pain that last longer than an hour or two. The longer it lasts, the less likely it will disappear. & # 39;

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