CBS News engineer stumbled on LSD during NINE HOURS after he hit the synthesizer from the 60s

CBS News sound engineer stumbled over LSD during NINE HOUR after holding a & # 39; 60 synthesizer in the drug he had enveloped decades ago and swallowed through his skin

  • Eliot Curtis repaired the Buchla Model 100 synthesizer from Cal State East Bay
  • The device from the 60s had been left in a cold, dark cupboard for decades
  • Curtis removed a button around a & # 39; scab or a crystalline residue & # 39; to clean underneath
  • After 45 minutes, Curtis had & # 39; weird tingling sensation & # 39; and & # 39; stumbled across LSD & # 39;
  • It is unclear whether LSD has been accidentally spilled or stored intentionally
  • There are rumors that musicians would wet their fingers and envelop the device in LSD for psychedelic inspiration
  • Curtis has repaired the synthesizer while wearing gloves and is back in class

A Broadcast Operations Manager for a local California CBS News station stumbled upon hitting LSD links on a 1960s synthesizer.

Eliot Curtis – who works for KPIX Channel 5 – repaired the device that was left in a cold, dark cabinet at Cal State University East Bay in San Francisco.

Curtis said after removing a module and spraying under a button to & # 39; a crust or a crystalline residue & # 39; to clean that he had seen, the dissolved matter began to take effect.

& # 39; It was … it felt like I was stumbling on LSD & # 39 ;, he said Kpix Television about his & # 39; weird tingling sensation & # 39; 45 minutes later.

Eliot Curtis repaired the Buchla Model 100 synthesizer from Cal State East Bay when he got high

Eliot Curtis repaired the Buchla Model 100 synthesizer from Cal State East Bay when he got high

The device from the 60s had been abandoned for decades at the school in San Francisco, California

The device from the 60s had been abandoned for decades at the school in San Francisco, California

The device from the 60s had been abandoned for decades at the school in San Francisco, California

Curtis removed a button around a & # 39; scab or a crystalline residue & # 39; clean underneath and felt a & # 39; weird tingling sensation & # 39;

Curtis removed a button around a & # 39; scab or a crystalline residue & # 39; clean underneath and felt a & # 39; weird tingling sensation & # 39;

Curtis removed a button around a & # 39; scab or a crystalline residue & # 39; clean underneath and felt a & # 39; weird tingling sensation & # 39;

LSD cannot be taken if the skin is dry.

The late-Swiss scientist Albert Hofman – the first to make LSD – believes that he accidentally swallowed the medicine through his skin.

It is often taken orally on tissue paper where a liquid form of the drug is incorporated.

HOW LONG DOES LSD POTENT STAY?

Investigations suggest that LSD can be stored indefinitely as long as it is stored in a cool, dark and preferably airtight room.

Li, McNally, Wang & Salamone (1998) found that UV light dissolves lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) by 10 percent in just one hour and the same would take a week in fluorescent light.

Amberglas helps protect LSD against light damage, but transparent containers can keep it powerful, as long as it is made of polypropylene.

The optimum temperature for storage is -4 degrees Fahrenheit, about the same as a home freezer. However, a freezer poses the risk of condensation, even if the LSD is vacuum-tight.

LSD can also be stored in water, but it must be dissolved in distilled H 2 O, otherwise chlorine can make its components inactive.

It is not clear whether the lysergic acid diethylamide was accidentally spilled on the synthesizer or whether it was deliberately contained therein.

There are rumors that musicians wet their fingers and touch the device with LSD for the psychedelic feeling.

This specific Buchla Model 100 was made by the late Don Buchla of the University of California, Berkeley, and some of them ended up in a bus purchased by LSD advocate Ken Kesey in 1966.

Buchla was also friends with Grateful Dead sound engineer Owsley Stanley – also known as Bear – and famous for making the purest street LSD.

Professor Ines Thiebaut, assistant professor, said the synthesizer was popular at a time when musicians were looking for new ways to create sound.

It is played by turning knobs and patching cords.

It is possible that the LSD was easily placed there by musicians hoping to be inspired because they created new sounds.

It's a good thing that students didn't find the instrument that a retired professor who used it was left in the corner of a classroom while working at school.

Curtis said he felt that he & # 39; stumbled on LSD & # 39; for nine hours after he touched the residue

Curtis said he felt that he & # 39; stumbled on LSD & # 39; for nine hours after he touched the residue

Curtis said he felt that he & # 39; stumbled on LSD & # 39; for nine hours after he touched the residue

Retired professor William R. Shannon said he had been abandoned in the corner of a classroom while working at school.

Retired professor William R. Shannon said he had been abandoned in the corner of a classroom while working at school.

Professor Ines Thiebaut, assistant professor, said the synthesizer was popular at a time when musicians were looking for new ways to create sound

Professor Ines Thiebaut, assistant professor, said the synthesizer was popular at a time when musicians were looking for new ways to create sound

Retired professor William R. Shannon (left) said he was abandoned in the corner of a classroom while working at school. Assistant Professor of Music Ines Thiebaut (right) said the synthesizer was popular when musicians & # 39; were looking for new ways to create sound & # 39;

It is unclear whether LSD has been accidentally spilled or stored intentionally. Pictured is Buchla Model 100 maker Don Buchla. There are rumors that musicians would wet their fingers and envelop the device in LSD for psychedelic inspiration

It is unclear whether LSD has been accidentally spilled or stored intentionally. Pictured is Buchla Model 100 maker Don Buchla. There are rumors that musicians would wet their fingers and envelop the device in LSD for psychedelic inspiration

It is unclear whether LSD has been accidentally spilled or stored intentionally. Pictured is Buchla Model 100 maker Don Buchla. There are rumors that musicians would wet their fingers and envelop the device in LSD for psychedelic inspiration

Some of the Buchla Model 100s ended up in a bus that LSD lawyer Ken Kesey had bought in 1966 (photo)

Some of the Buchla Model 100s ended up in a bus that LSD lawyer Ken Kesey had bought in 1966 (photo)

Some of the Buchla Model 100s ended up in a bus that LSD lawyer Ken Kesey had bought in 1966 (photo)

It was commissioned by Glenn Glasow, Robert Basart, a teacher at California State University, but some modules on the analog modular instrument were added at a later date.

Curtis has finished repairing the instrument while wearing gloves and it is back in the classroom for students to use.

Wife Holly told KPIX: & I think it's super wild. I think this whole situation is a beautiful chapter in the history of counterculture. & # 39;

The instrument model was commissioned by Glenn Glasow, professor at the school in Cal East, East Bay

The instrument model was commissioned by Glenn Glasow, professor at the school in Cal East, East Bay

The late-Swiss scientist Albert Hofman - the first to make LSD - believes that he accidentally swallowed the medicine through his skin.

The late-Swiss scientist Albert Hofman - the first to make LSD - believes that he accidentally swallowed the medicine through his skin.

The instrument model was commissioned by Glenn Glasow, a teacher at California State University, and Robert Basart (photo left). The late-Swiss scientist Albert Hofman (photo on the right in 1994) – the first to make LSD – thinks he accidentally swallowed the drug through his skin

Curtis completed repairing the synthesizer while wearing gloves and he is now back in class

Curtis completed repairing the synthesizer while wearing gloves and he is now back in class

Curtis completed repairing the synthesizer while wearing gloves and he is now back in class

His wife Holly told KPIX: & I think it's super wild. I think this whole situation is a beautiful chapter in the history of counterculture. & # 39;

His wife Holly told KPIX: & I think it's super wild. I think this whole situation is a beautiful chapter in the history of counterculture. & # 39;

His wife Holly told KPIX: & I think it's super wild. I think this whole situation is a beautiful chapter in the history of counterculture. & # 39;

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