Caterer blasts her boss for banning staff from taking leftover food after a wedding

Caterer blasts her boss because she forbids staff to take leftover food after a wedding and insists it falls into the trash – but Facebook users claim it is food safety

  • A woman blows her anger on Facebook about her boss's rules about keeping remains
  • Caterer almost claims to be fired because he tried to sneak away with uneaten food
  • She says staff often go home starving after a working day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Contributors to the thread were torn; some said it is unsafe for staff to store food
  • Others threw the policy, branding her capitalism from the boss at its worst & # 39;
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A woman started a long debate after she revealed that the catering company where she works does not allow the staff to take home leftover food.

The employee, from Quebec, hired Facebook to vent her anger after she was almost fired for trying to sneak away with the remains of a dish served at a wedding.

She claimed that staff often works 10 hours a day and goes home starving at 2 o'clock at night, while unbeaten food is thrown in the trash.

The Facebook user received a divided response from the respondents, with many arguments that the decision about what to do with leftovers is most likely due to health and safety regulations.

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A Quebec caterer initiated a lengthy debate on Facebook after claiming that she and her colleague & # 39; s could take remnants of home from weddings (file image)

A Quebec caterer initiated a lengthy debate on Facebook after claiming that she and her colleague & # 39; s could take remnants of home from weddings (file image)

In a closed Facebook group, the woman explained that she was almost fired because she was trying to sneak leftovers home

A former bride wrote: & I think it's about food safety. When we looked at caterers, we wondered if we would keep the leftovers and we were told that we should sign a waiver stating that we understand the consequences of eating food that was prepared hours ahead, etc. & # 39;

Another said: & # 39; I think the problem here is that they don't want you to consume food that may have been spoiled and that a whole new can of worms opens, so to speak … & # 39 ;.

A third added: & # 39; Putting my company here. It would seem unprofessional to be seen doing this (by potential future customers) and even if leftovers become a fair game … you can guarantee that less goes out or things are deliberately withheld to be "leftovers." & # 39;

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But others were on the employee's side and threw her boss because she insisted on throwing away the remaining good with the announcement that it had to be donated to a good cause or to the staff.

A stream of reactions to the post argued that hospitality companies usually prohibit staff from storing food due to safety regulations
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A stream of reactions to the post argued that hospitality companies usually prohibit staff from storing food due to safety regulations

A stream of reactions to the post argued that hospitality companies usually prohibit staff from storing food due to safety regulations

One person said: & # 39; I would insist that my servers take any unspoiled food. Food wastage is not necessary. & # 39;

Another wrote: & # 39; Have the employees take over the leftovers or donate it to a good cause. Simply throwing it away must be a crime. & # 39;

A third added: & # 39; Once guests are served, leftovers are a fair game. Period, & # 39; while they went so far as to imitate the boss's capitalism for the worst & # 39 ;.

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Many responses to the discussion argued that surpluses should either be donated to charity or given to staff to take home
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Many responses to the discussion argued that surpluses should either be donated to charity or given to staff to take home

Many responses to the discussion argued that surpluses should either be donated to charity or given to staff to take home

Many employees began to share their own experiences with working within the catering, including a person who claimed that food-saving staff could cost the company.

She explained: & # 39; They … should let you take a break, but are not required to feed you.

& # 39; Worked in catering and technically the food is not theirs. So if the wedding party or someone who has paid for services caught you, it could cost the company. & # 39;

But someone did not agree and wrote: & # 39; That is a nasty policy. When I was a server, we always had a meal from the dinner and the kitchen and servers shared the remains to take home. & # 39;

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Others began to share their own experiences of keeping food while working in the hospitality industry

Others began to share their own experiences of keeping food while working in the hospitality industry

Others began to share their own experiences of keeping food while working in the hospitality industry

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) femail

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