WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Category 3 cyclone could enter Sydney this week

Large wet yield: huge storm system on target for a direct hit on the east coast while tired residents are still fighting floods caused by the heaviest rain showers in three decades

  • A category three cyclone is getting faster and faster and passes New Caledonia
  • Tropical cyclone Uesi could reach the strength of category 3 on Tuesday afternoon
  • Joint Typhoon Warning Center said that storm could go to the NSW coast
  • Bureau of Meteorology said the storm was “a few days out” from Australia
  • But the agency said that NSW could see heavier weather if the storm moved west

A category three cyclone is expected to bring more torrential rains to Sydney this week, just a few days after the city has recovered its heaviest downpour in 30 years.

About 65,000 homes and businesses in the city were still without power on Tuesday morning after 400 mm of rain fell on parts of the state on Sunday.

Several serious weather warnings issued by the Bureau of Meteorology remain in force on Tuesday morning in NSW – including the Hunter, Illawarra and South Coast areas.

Scroll down for video

Waves are depicted on the coast near houses in Collaroy on the northern beaches of Sydney on Monday. The heaviest downpour of Sydney at 30 years during the weekend could be followed by more misery from the tropical cyclone Uesi

Waves are depicted on the coast near houses in Collaroy on the northern beaches of Sydney on Monday. The heaviest downpour of Sydney at 30 years during the weekend could be followed by more misery from the tropical cyclone Uesi

While the fierce weather system gathers over New Caledonia, forecasters predict that tropical cyclone Uesi can affect the Australian coast

While the fierce weather system gathers over New Caledonia, forecasters predict that tropical cyclone Uesi can affect the Australian coast

While the fierce weather system gathers over New Caledonia, forecasters predict that tropical cyclone Uesi can affect the Australian coast

Forecasters now predict tropical cyclone Uesi – which is expected to change from a category-2 to a category-3 tropical cyclone by Tuesday afternoon – may affect the Australian east coast.

“The system is out for several days,” BoM predictor Gabrielle Woodhouse told Daily Mail Australia.

“But if the system comes west, we can see dangerous surf in New South Wales and Lord Howe Island.”

Weatherzone said the dangerous surf could be accompanied by strong winds and more heavy rain – although there are no estimates yet about how much rainfall there will be.

The system will be followed by authorities in Fiji from Monday evening, and Ms. Woodhouse said it is still unclear in which direction the cyclone will go.

“Currently, all the information posted by Fiji on Uesi is that the system will follow further south – but where it comes from, a greater one is unknown,” she said.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center has said that the storm – even in a weakened state – is on course to head southwest to the NSW coast.

People watch rough ocean conditions at Bronte Beach in Sydney on Monday. Cyclone Uesi can bring more dangerous waves and strong winds to the east coast of Australia

People watch rough ocean conditions at Bronte Beach in Sydney on Monday. Cyclone Uesi can bring more dangerous waves and strong winds to the east coast of Australia

People watch rough ocean conditions at Bronte Beach in Sydney on Monday. Cyclone Uesi can bring more dangerous waves and strong winds to the east coast of Australia

Map-based projections released by the organization demonstrated that the system reached pace northwest of New Caledonia before increasing in size as it approached the NSW / Queensland border.

In the more advanced stages of cyclone development, winds were able to reach speeds of 55 knots – 101 km / h.

For reference: during the record the wind speed during the weekend reached 107 km / h off the coast of Sydney.

The average rainfall in Sydney for the month of February is 117 mm.

Sydney dam levels bounce back after years of crippling drought

Dam levels in larger Sydney have increased by more than 20 percentage points in the midst of heavy weekend rainfall, with enough water for no less than 150,000 Olympic swimming pools that flow into the Warragamba Dam.

Sydney, the Central Coast and the Blue Mountains were soaked after receiving between 200 mm and 400 mm of rain from 9 a.m. on Friday to 5 p.m. on Sunday, with additional rain expected on Monday and during the week.

The Bureau of Meteorology suggested on Sunday that Sydney had not experienced any rainfall since the new millennium.

Water NSW data on Monday morning showed that greater drafts in Sydney were 64.2 percent, compared to 41.9 percent in seven days.

Aerial photo of Wivenhoe Dam near Brisbane releasing water from its drain

Aerial photo of Wivenhoe Dam near Brisbane releasing water from its drain

Aerial photo of Wivenhoe Dam near Brisbane releasing water from its drain

Warragamba Dam earned the value of a year in one weekend and rose 17.7 percentage points to reach 60.7 percent on Monday at 10.30 a.m. Around 360,000 megaliter of water flowed into the dam – almost 150,000 swimming pools.

The dam was 61.4 percent full this time last year.

Water NSW said in a statement on Sunday that the ash and debris generated by recent forest fires around the Warragamba area would not affect water quality.

Two sludge curtains are present to intercept ash removal.

Warragamba Dam supplied Lake Burragorang - the primary reservoir that supplies water to the city

Warragamba Dam supplied Lake Burragorang - the primary reservoir that supplies water to the city

Warragamba Dam supplied Lake Burragorang – the primary reservoir that supplies water to the city

“Although some ash and debris has been washed in the tops of the Warragamba system, this has no impact on the water quality that is supplied for treatment. Any surface waste is avoided by extracting water from 30m below the surface as a precaution, “WaterNSW said in a statement.

Prospect Dam is more than 90 percent full, while Woronora Dam in southern Sydney is nearly 60 percent full, with 25 percentage points.

The Bureau of Meteorology predicted harsher weather conditions on Monday with heavy rainfall, strong winds and harmful waves along the entire coast of the NSW and the interior of the NSW.

Flash floods remain a possibility in various NSW regions, including Sydney.

Map-based projections released by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center showed that the system reached pace northwest of New Caledonia

Map-based projections released by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center showed that the system reached pace northwest of New Caledonia

Map-based projections released by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center showed that the system reached pace northwest of New Caledonia

The storm caused electricity problems in the city with 150,000 houses and businesses that were closed on Sunday evening.

By Tuesday morning, Ausgrid still had 59,000 homes and businesses without electricity.

While Endeavor Energy made an effort to restore the electricity for 5,000 customers.

The power was restored in homes mainly in the north of Sydney, the northern beaches, eastern suburbs, southwest and southwest, and the Central Coast and Newcastle.

But the electricity company warned that some residents could be kept in the dark “for the coming days if we recover from the storm.”

FOUR DAYS WEATHER FORECAST

SYDNEY

TUESDAY: Min 22. Max. 27 showers

WEDNESDAY: Min 22. Max 28 Showers

THURSDAY: Min 22. Max. 27 showers

FRIDAY: Min 22. Max. 27 showers

BRISBANE:

TUESDAY: Min 24. Max. Showers

WEDNESDAY: Min 24 Max 29. Showers

THURSDAY: Min 23. Max 28. Showers

FRIDAY: Min 23. Max. Showers

ADELAIDE:

TUESDAY: Min 19. Max 28. Cloudy

WEDNESDAY: Min, 18. Max 28. Sunny

THURSDAY: Min, 18. Max 32. Sunny

FRIDAY: Min, 17. Max 27. Mostly sunny

PERTH:

TUESDAY: Min 22. Max 34. Cloudy

WEDNESDAY: Min 20. Max 31. Cloudy

THURSDAY: Min 21. Max 32. Sunny

FRIDAY: Min 22. Max 33. Mostly sunny

MELBOURNE:

TUESDAY: Min 19. Max 25. Showers

WEDNESDAY: Min 18. Max 25. Showers

THURSDAY: Min 18. Max 28. Showers

FRIDAY: Min 19. Max 30. Showers

CANBERRA:

TUESDAY: Min 17. Max 26. Showers

WEDNESDAY: Min 18. Max. Showers

THURSDAY: Min 18. Max 26. Showers

FRIDAY: Min 17. Max 28. Showers

DARWIN:

TUESDAY: Min 26. Max 33. Shower

WEDNESDAY: Min 27. Max 33. Showers

THURSDAY: Min 27. Max 34. Storm

FRIDAY: Min 28. Max 34. Storm

HOBART:

TUESDAY: Min 18. Max 25. Showers

WEDNESDAY: Min 16. Max 20. Showers

THURSDAY: Min 13. Max 20. Showers

FRIDAY: Min. 15. Max. 23. Showers

Source: Bureau of Meteorology

.

Comments
Loading...