Cars can now ‘talk to traffic lights’ so vehicles can anticipate the green light

Drivers will soon be able to avoid idling traffic lights thanks to the state-of-the-art SEAT technology that knows when the lights will turn red or green.

The last SEAT Leon, revealed today, is connected to the cloud that provides instant data at nearby traffic lights.

Then he tells the drivers what color the light will be when they arrive, assuming the tget does not exceed the speed limit.

The information will be shared with the 10-inch on-board information and entertainment screen and will allow drivers to reduce speed or accelerate their approach to avoid unwanted delays.

The last Spanish-made SEAT Leon, revealed today, is equipped with technology that allows you to send and receive information from the surrounding infrastructure through the cloud (pictured)

SEAT Leon tested the technology, called V2I, or 'Vehicle for infrastructure', in Barcelona. He claims to be looking for ways to improve road safety, traffic flow and environmental efficiency

SEAT Leon tested the technology, called V2I, or 'Vehicle for infrastructure', in Barcelona. He claims to be looking for ways to improve road safety, traffic flow and environmental efficiency

SEAT Leon tested the technology, called V2I, or ‘Vehicle for infrastructure’, in Barcelona. He claims to be looking for ways to improve road safety, traffic flow and environmental efficiency

SEAT Leon tested the technology, called V2I or ‘Vehicle for infrastructure’, in Barcelona.

He claims to be looking for ways to improve road safety, traffic flow and environmental efficiency.

When the Lion approaches a traffic light, an alert appears on the screen indicating whether it will be red, green or yellow when the car arrives.

Then calculate how far the car is from the lights and the speed at which it travels using real-time traffic data sent to the ‘cloud’ directly from the car.

The process, which lasts only 300 milliseconds, connects cars to the cloud through an Internet connection.

The Highway Agency has previously said that ‘cooperative intelligent transport systems’ (C-ITS) will play an important role in the future of British roads.

The data will be exchanged between connected vehicles, control centers, infrastructure, personal devices and cloud-based storage.

Data exchange is expected to improve traffic flow, improve fuel efficiency and lead to greater safety.

The authorities also hope to use the information to transmit messages to a connected car at any point on the road.

When the Lion approaches a traffic light, an alert appeared on the screen indicating whether it will be red, green or yellow when the car arrives

When the Lion approaches a traffic light, an alert appeared on the screen indicating whether it will be red, green or yellow when the car arrives

When the Lion approaches a traffic light, an alert appeared on the screen indicating whether it will be red, green or yellow when the car arrives

Information on nearby infrastructure, including traffic lights, will be shared with the 10 'infotainment display on board (pictured) and will allow drivers to reduce or accelerate their approach to avoid unwanted delays

Information on nearby infrastructure, including traffic lights, will be shared with the 10 'infotainment display on board (pictured) and will allow drivers to reduce or accelerate their approach to avoid unwanted delays

Information on nearby infrastructure, including traffic lights, will be shared with the 10 ‘infotainment display on board (pictured) and will allow drivers to reduce or accelerate their approach to avoid unwanted delays

Jordi Caus, head of Urban Mobility Concepts at SEAT, said: “ Queuing at traffic lights can be a frustrating process and it always feels like a ‘victory’ when you manage to time your driving perfectly for when the lights turn green.

‘With this project, we are taking a first step to connect cars with the general traffic infrastructure.

New SEAT connected cars receive real-time traffic information from the central cloud of the Traffic Authority, including information displayed on highway panels or traffic light status in cities.

‘The traffic light sends a signal to the Traffic Authority’s cloud about its current status and when it will change.

‘Improves safety by providing advanced information about traffic lights that turn red depending on their speed and, therefore, prevents sudden braking.

“This test shows how SEAT is looking for ways to use technology and data on human intuition to improve traffic flow, road safety and fuel efficiency.”

SEAT, which collaborated with the Spanish Traffic Authority, the Barcelona City Council and ETRA on the project, has just officially presented the new León, which is full of ‘connected’ technology.

The automaker has invested almost £ 1 billion to develop the family hatchback full of technology, providing it with a 10 ‘central information and entertainment display, which includes gesture recognition.

It also has a built-in eSIM that allows the eCall service to contact emergency services directly in the event of a car accident.

Rival Ford is also working on the connectivity of its vehicles and recently announced that it will implement Local Risk Information Technology (LHI) in most of its vehicles.

Ford wants to equip 80 percent of its 2020 vehicles with technology that warns drivers about upcoming traffic accidents, bad weather and traffic jams.

The system collects data from other connected road users, emergency services and authorities and transmits them from the cloud directly to the car.

Alerts appear on the car dashboard screen warning the driver about what is around the corner.

Rival Ford is also working on the connectivity of its vehicles and recently announced that it will implement Local Risk Information Technology (LHI) in most of its vehicles. Ford wants to equip 80 percent of its 2020 vehicles with technology that warns drivers about upcoming traffic accidents, bad weather and traffic jams

Rival Ford is also working on the connectivity of its vehicles and recently announced that it will implement Local Risk Information Technology (LHI) in most of its vehicles. Ford wants to equip 80 percent of its 2020 vehicles with technology that warns drivers about upcoming traffic accidents, bad weather and traffic jams

Rival Ford is also working on the connectivity of its vehicles and recently announced that it will implement Local Risk Information Technology (LHI) in most of its vehicles. Ford wants to equip 80 percent of its 2020 vehicles with technology that warns drivers about upcoming traffic accidents, bad weather and traffic jams

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