Carlson accuses Fauci of perjury, says email dump reveals he lied about coronavirus

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Fox News host Tucker Carlson Wednesday accused Dr. Anthony Fauci of perjury, saying a large number of emails from the expert released earlier in the day suggested he had lied about research into the origins of the coronavirus.

Carlson said the emails also suggested Fauci was making misleading statements about the efficacy of post-infection immunity and mask wearing.

“We are Americans,” he said. “So we assumed that the man in charge of protecting the US from COVID must be rational and impressive.

“We also assumed he had to be honest, but we were wrong. It soon became apparent that Tony Fauci was just another sleazy federal bureaucrat, deeply political and often dishonest.

“More shocking than that, then we found out that Fauci himself was involved in the pandemic he should have been fighting.”

Carlson’s comments came after a trove of 3,200 emails from Fauci from January to June 2020 were obtained and published by Buzzfeed.

They showed leading virus experts warning Fauci that COVID-19 may have been created in a lab, while publicly rejecting such claims.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson said a large number of emails sent by Dr.  Anthony Fauci suggested that the country's top disease expert had lied about investigating the origins of the coronavirus, accusing him of perjury.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson said a large number of emails sent by Dr. Anthony Fauci suggested that the country’s top disease expert had lied about investigating the origins of the coronavirus, accusing him of perjury.

The host’s parsing of the emails began with the emails Fauci sent early in the pandemic, raising concerns that people might believe the virus emerged from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, a Chinese lab in the province where the disease originated.

The concern, Carlson said, was likely based on U.S. government-funded research done in conjunction with the lab.

On January 1, 2020, shortly after the first cases of the virus were discovered, Dr. Kristian Anderson, an immunologist at the Scripps Research Institute, said some features of the virus may have been caused by humans.

Shortly thereafter, Fauci sent an urgent email to a deputy of his, Hugh Auchincloss, asking him to review a document he enclosed entitled “baric, shi et al nature medicine SARS gain of function.”

Carlson went so far as to say that Fauci had tried to cover up suggestions that the virus could be man-made, as well as the nature of the US government-funded research into the disease in Wuhan, the Chinese province where the virus originated. came.

Carlson went so far as to say that Fauci had tried to cover up suggestions that the virus could be man-made, as well as the nature of the US government-funded research into the disease in Wuhan, the Chinese province where the virus originated. came.

While the contents of the attachment are unknown, the title, Carlson said, was likely a reference to Dr. Ralph Baric, a US-based virologist, who conducted US government-funded research in collaboration with Wuhan Institute scientist Dr. Shi Zhengli, who specializes in the transmission of the coronavirus in bats.

Functional gain research involves altering diseases to increase their transmissibility.

As late as May 11, Carlson said, Fauci had denied that Baric had conducted a performance screening for the coronavirus, which he said is a lie from the emails.

“In retrospect, that looks a lot like perjury,” said the presenter.

In other emails from the start of the pandemic, British medical researcher Dr. Jeremy Farrar, who was involved in early top-secret conference calls about the virus, published an article from the website ZeroHedge that suggested the virus could be a bioweapon.

British medical expert Dr.  Jeremy Farrar, who was in the early international discussions about the coronavirus, shared an article from a website suggesting the virus was a bioweapon.  Social media networks would later ban the sharing of articles from that site

British medical expert Dr. Jeremy Farrar, who was in the early international discussions about the coronavirus, shared an article from a website suggesting the virus was a bioweapon. Social media networks would later ban the sharing of articles from that site

Carlson said that conclusion seemed more likely than early reports that the virus may have originated from Chinese pangolins.

Articles shared from ZeroHendge were later banned from major social media networks, which the host said came under pressure from figures like Fauci, who said the virus could not be caused by humans.

“Tony Fauci assured the tech monopolies that the coronavirus couldn’t be man-made,” he said, “so the tech monopolies closed the topic.”

On April 17, 2020, Fauci announced that the virus was believed to have originated from bats in China, which Carlson said the disease expert could not have known definitively so early in the pandemic.

“He couldn’t have known that at the time,” he said. “That was unfair.”

In an email sent two days after the announcement, Dr. Peter Daszak, a virologist who conducted U.S. government-funded coronavirus research in Wuhan, urged Fauci: “to stand up publicly and state that the scientific evidence supports a natural origin for Covid 19. of a bat-to-human spillover.’

Carlson said the emails suggested that Dr.  Peter Daszak, a virologist who conducted government-funded coronavirus research in Wuhan, could face criminal charges

Carlson said the emails suggested that Dr. Peter Daszak, a virologist who conducted government-funded coronavirus research in Wuhan, could face criminal charges

Much of the rest of the email, however, was redacted under a Freedom of Information Act article, which blocks the release of data that could interfere with law enforcement proceedings.

Carlson suggested it could propose an investigation into the two’s dealings.

‘Were Peter Dazak and Tony Fauci under criminal investigation? We can only hope they are. They certainly deserve it’

Other emails between oncologist Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel and Fauci, Carlson said, suggested that Fauci has made misleading comments about the efficacy of coronavirus immunity after someone has recovered from the virus.

In a March 4, 2020 email, responding to a question from Emanuel on the matter, Fauci wrote that “there is no evidence in this regard, but you would assume their immunity after infection would be significant.”

“Studies now show it to be true,” Carlson said. In fact, studies now show it to be true. People who have had Covid and have recovered almost never get sick from Covid again. So they don’t need to be vaccinated.’

However, he noted that the disease expert has yet to confirm how safe a person is from infection after recovering from the virus.

Other emails with Emanuel early in the pandemic, Carlson said, have cast Fauci into questioning the efficacy of mask-wearing, which the doctor has repeatedly urged publicly since.

Based on the email’s conclusion, Carlson said the masks are “in short, a form of make-believe that he had again, well, under oath in public, Tony Fauci claimed the exact opposite.”

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