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Career experts outline the five different email personalities and what they mean

The “single word replier,” the “walker,” and the “black hole” are three of the top five email personalities, career experts have revealed.

The team of Search explained that while email is an invaluable tool in the workplace, and more importantly when so many people are working remotely, it can pose problems to the extent that people often communicate very differently online.

“This can pose challenges when trying to confirm project details, gather information, or get other work-related issues over the line,” their team wrote in a blog post.

So what are the top five email personalities and what category do you fall into?

The 'single word replier', the 'walker' and the 'black hole' are three of the top five email personalities, career experts have revealed (stock image)

The ‘single word replier’, the ‘walker’ and the ‘black hole’ are three of the top five email personalities, career experts have revealed (stock image)

1. The black hole

Poll

Which email personality are you?

  • The black hole 1 votes
  • The overly communicator 0 votes
  • The Rambler 0 votes
  • The single word replier 1 votes
  • The LOLCats sender 0 votes

The first – and arguably the most annoying – of the email categories is the ‘Black Hole’ personality – or someone who never responds to their emails.

“ Even if you ask for a confirmation reply or mark emails to them with that little urgent flag, they never respond, ” said Seek experts.

The best way to deal with this kind of personality is to not email them repeatedly while you get more and more annoyed, but to get them on the phone or, if you work in the same location, wave past their desks.

The Seek team added that if it’s vital that you have a paper trail confirming what you discussed, just send them a very short email after your personal chat.

Common email personalities include the 'Over-Communicator', which communicates too much and the 'Black Hole' that never responds due to too many emails (stock image)

Common email personalities include the 'Over-Communicator', which communicates too much and the 'Black Hole' that never responds due to too many emails (stock image)

Common email personalities include the ‘Over-Communicator’, which communicates too much and the ‘Black Hole’ that never responds due to too many emails (stock image)

2. The Over Communicator

The second email personality is the ‘Over-Communicator’, which sends out a series of emails regularly and even comes by your desk to tell you they just sent an email.

“It may seem unnecessary, but keep in mind that some of these people just prefer more personal communication, or may not be overly confident in using technology,” said the Seek team.

The best way to manage these types of email personalities is to respond to their emails as soon as possible, if only to make sure you get back to them appropriately.

Don’t leave them unanswered for too long, or they will only get nervous.

'The Rambler' is a fan of sending hugely long emails that take paragraphs and paragraphs to get to the point (stock image)

'The Rambler' is a fan of sending hugely long emails that take paragraphs and paragraphs to get to the point (stock image)

‘The Rambler’ is a fan of sending hugely long emails that take paragraphs and paragraphs to get to the point (stock image)

3. The Rambler

‘The Rambler’ is a fan of sending super long emails that take paragraphs and paragraphs to get to the point.

Their long-winded, stream-of-awareness style of emails often confuses and upsets recipients, who have to dig through piles of information to get to the point.

If you are dealing with a ‘walker’ search report, you should scroll through what they say as soon as possible to get relevant information out.

If you need confirmation, respond with short bullet points, and hopefully they get the idea.

4. The singular answer

We all know a ‘Single Word Replier’, which often just returns to important emails that need more information with sharp answers such as ‘Okay’, ‘No’ or ‘Wednesday’.

“These people usually need time, or prefer a direct approach,” Seek explains.

To have a good working relationship with this type of email personality, you need to keep your communication with them friendly and to the point.

Finally, the 'LolCats Sender' is someone who sends you everything from memes to inspirational quotes and cat videos to distract you all day long (stock image)

Finally, the 'LolCats Sender' is someone who sends you everything from memes to inspirational quotes and cat videos to distract you all day long (stock image)

Finally, the ‘LolCats Sender’ is someone who sends you everything from memes to inspirational quotes and cat videos to distract you all day long (stock image)

5. The LOLCats sender

Finally, the ‘LolCats Sender’ is someone who sends you everything – from memes to inspirational quotes and cat videos to distract you throughout the work day.

This type of email personality can tend to ‘clog your inbox with non-work junk,’ and while some people love these emails, others despise them.

If you are someone who cannot handle these emails, try politely asking that you do not use CCd for it.

You can also try making them go to a folder, but make sure to check the folder every now and then so you can see if there’s anything work-related you need to know about.

Previously, Sydney executive coach Nicole Grainger-Marsh (pictured) revealed the most common mistakes made in professional emails, including writing 'thank you in advance'

Previously, Sydney executive coach Nicole Grainger-Marsh (pictured) revealed the most common mistakes made in professional emails, including writing 'thank you in advance'

Previously, Sydney executive coach Nicole Grainger-Marsh (pictured) revealed the most common mistakes made in professional emails, including writing ‘thank you in advance’

Previously, Sydney executive coach Nicole Grainger-Marsh revealed the most common mistakes made in professional emails.

Ms. Grainger-Marsh said that unnecessarily marking correspondence as “urgent” comes across as impatient and legitimate, while writing long paragraphs full of unnecessary information portrays you as a bad communicator.

You should also avoid skipping pleasantries, as this can appear rude, and you should never write “ thanks in advance, ” which comes across as passive-aggressive.

Finally, it may seem like pressing “answer all” or copying half of the office in an email chain, according to Ms. Grainger-Marsh, is shying away from responsibility or shifting some of your workload onto others.

You also need to make sure you have perfect grammar.

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