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Care home forced to close after 15 residents died of coronavirus

A care home forced to close after 15 residents died of the coronavirus claimed staff were “pressured” to take untested patients to “free hospital beds.”

Temple Court in Kettering, Northants, was supposed to be Covid-free before the NHS shooting, but was forced to close after staff fell ill.

A source said the facility admitted 15 NHS patients from the city’s hospital who were not existing residents in March.

The insider told The Sunday People: “It’s a huge scandal. Hospitals pressured nursing homes to take in patients, despite having no idea whether they had coronavirus or not. ‘

Between March 28 and May 1, 15 people died, five with Covid-19, seven suspected to have it, and three with unknown causes. Ten of those who died were NHS patients.

Temple Court (pictured) in Kettering, Northants, was believed to be covid-free before NHS shooting, but forced to close after staff fell ill

Temple Court (pictured) in Kettering, Northants, was believed to be covid-free before NHS shooting, but forced to close after staff fell ill

According to government guidelines, patients had to be released into care homes until April 16, even if they had tested positive for Covid-19, or without any test, a MEP said.

About 12,526 residents have died of coronavirus, more than a third of the total death toll, according to official figures, but the actual figure could exceed 22,000.

A 16th resident, an 87-year-old woman, was reportedly admitted to intensive care after a positive test for the virus.

It is thought that the 12 employees of the house were all marked with coronavirus symptoms after the NHS patients arrived.

Nine tested positive for coronavirus, and agency workers had to be called in to run the house.

Approximately 12,526 residents have died of coronavirus, according to official figures - more than a third of the total death toll - but the actual figure may exceed 22,000 (file image)

Approximately 12,526 residents have died of coronavirus, according to official figures - more than a third of the total death toll - but the actual figure may exceed 22,000 (file image)

Approximately 12,526 residents have died of coronavirus, more than a third of the total death toll, according to official figures, but the actual figure could exceed 22,000 (file image)

The other residents moved to new facilities on Friday due to care problems.

The source added, “Temple Court went virus-free on March 19 to May 15 on May 1. No one had been tested, the hospital just wanted to get them out. That was the guidance from above.

“Another employee went down every other morning. Soon they ran without a manager or assistant, and then completely without personnel. They had to bring in temporary workers and the residents did not get the care they needed. ‘

Nadra Ahmed, Executive Chairman of the National Care Association, said the fact that the health care provider felt compelled to employ untested discharges underscored the industry’s dangerous position.

Minster Care, who runs Temple Court, declined to comment on the whistleblower claims, but said it was left in an “extremely challenging position.”

A spokesperson said that many employees, including the manager, were absent and disproportionately dependent on agency workers.

She added that the management team has now largely returned and they hope to be able to provide the highest standard of care again.

It comes as:

  • Britain announces 468 more coronavirus deaths on the first Saturday since the closure was eased, bringing the total number of fatalities in the country to 34,466;
  • Fighting between police and anti-lockdown protesters has broken out in Hyde Park and across the UK;
  • Disputes between ministers and unions intensified after Anne Longfield, the children’s commissioner in England, said schools should be reopened as soon as possible;
  • Public health England could face the ax after Boris Johnson told a 1922 Committee of Backseat Committee members of the Tory MPs that he was planning a review of “a number of institutions” once the corona virus was knocked back;
  • Experts from King’s College London have suggested that one in three patients who become seriously ill with coronavirus develop deadly blood clots that cause heart attacks, strokes and organ failure;
  • NHS director Simon Stevens said doctors in England still treat about 9,000 coronavirus patients every day, up from 19,000 at the peak of the infection in April;
  • The University of Nottingham has suggested that cases of coronavirus have fallen dramatically after the sunniest April ever, with strong UV light killing the virus and vitamin D boosting the immune system.
Britain registered another 468 coronavirus deaths today, bringing the official number of fatalities in the UK to 34,466

Britain registered another 468 coronavirus deaths today, bringing the official number of fatalities in the UK to 34,466

Britain registered another 468 coronavirus deaths today, bringing the official number of fatalities in the UK to 34,466

Yesterday, grieving relatives spoke of their “agony and anger” at the loss of older loved ones because of the nursing home’s strategy, which they say “abandoned an entire generation.”

Even when caregivers attempted to isolate recently discharged infected residents, they still caused outbreaks that swept through homes and claimed the lives of many more residents.

Despite this, the latest government policy still allows some patients who have tested positive for covid-19 in hospitals to be released into care homes, and:

  • Outbreaks triggered by this strategy had forced some residents to die alone and in agony because overwhelmed houses did not have enough staff to be with every victim when they died.
  • In a terrible outrage, the increase in fatalities meant that a death had to be confirmed by the overloaded GPs of the healthcare staff ‘FaceTiming’ who inspected a dead resident with their phone camera.
  • One man said that his mother was used as a ‘sacrificial lamb’ to free hospital beds after being returned to her nursing home despite coronavirus.
  • Equality watchdog considers whether human rights laws have been violated by hospitals discharging elderly patients to nursing homes.

At the St Nicholas Care Home in Bootle, Liverpool, 12 residents died after Aintree Hospital discharged two patients without testing them for coronavirus. One or two died almost every day for two weeks after the virus had passed through the house.

It had decided to close two weeks before official government guidelines to protect the 150 residents.

The policy kept it virus-free until the hospital asked to discharge two untested patients to its empty beds between March 30 and April 4.

The home manager, Adrienne Gresty, said Aintree Hospital “wanted the bed – it was almost as if they weren’t worried about the impact it would have.”

Government guidelines published on April 2 encouraged nursing homes to accept discharged patients, whether they showed symptoms or not. Negative tests were not required prior to transfers or admissions from hospitals to care homes.

The policy was intended to make beds in hospitals.

The Department of Health changed this strategy on April 16 to provide more protection.

But the revised policy still states that some patients who have tested positive can still be sent to nursing homes.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission said this week that it is considering investigating the legality of discharging potentially infected patients from hospitals to nursing homes.

Britain announces 468 more coronavirus deaths on the first Saturday since closing was eased – 30% less than the same day last week – bringing the total number of fatalities in the country to 34,466

By Connor Boyd for MailOnline

Britain again registered 468 coronavirus deaths on the first Saturday since the draconian seal was eased today, bringing the UK’s official death toll to 34,466.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson revealed the numbers, which are down 30 percent from last Saturday’s 346, during tonight’s press briefing in Downing Street, defending the government’s controversial decision to reopen schools in England next month .

Ministers have faced violent reactions from unions and anxious parents who fear the outbreak will get out of hand again if staff are not given enough personal protective equipment (PPE) and schools are unable to distance themselves.

Mr Williamson said that it is crucial that students return to education so that the poorest children in society do not fall further behind, adding, “They will be the ones who miss the opportunity. There are children from difficult or very unhappy families for whom school is the happiest time of their week and also the safest place for them. ‘

The education secretary promised that it would be a “cautious, phased return,” with smaller classes of no more than 15 and strict cleaning protocols. The plan is for children in kindergarten and preschool, reception and years 1 and 6 to go back on June 1. Pupils in the 10s and 12 are allowed to return on a limited basis, he said.

The government does not break down the number of deaths in different environments, such as hospitals or care homes, but at least 181 of today’s fatalities certainly took place in hospitals as NHS England reveals new deaths registered by trusts every afternoon.

Scotland (41), Wales (18) and Northern Ireland (four) add nursing home deaths to their daily updates – but the countries do not provide a clear overview of the number of fatalities in any environment.

It comes amid reports that Public Health England could be dropped following widespread criticism of its testing strategy, which lagged behind most countries in Europe.

More than 240,500 people have been officially diagnosed with the viral disease, but the true magnitude of the British outbreak is significantly larger due to a controversial decision to end a widespread mop regime early in the crisis.

Government officials suggesting up to 6.6 million probably caught it only in England. Prime Minister Boris Johnson informed a meeting of the 1922 Committee of Backbench Conservatives that he planned to revise “a number of institutions” as soon as the corona virus was knocked back.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson revealed that a further 468 Britons had died of coronavirus during tonight's press briefing on Downing Street, defending the government's controversial decision to reopen schools in England next month

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson revealed that a further 468 Britons had died of coronavirus during tonight's press briefing on Downing Street, defending the government's controversial decision to reopen schools in England next month

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson revealed that a further 468 Britons had died of coronavirus during tonight’s press briefing on Downing Street, defending the government’s controversial decision to reopen schools in England next month

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