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Charlie Ilsley flew to Turkey for a treatment for brain cancer that is not available on the NHS
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A mother claims that her 12-year-old son got all cancer-free cancer after treatment to Turkey.

Toni Ilsley & # 39; s son Charlie was diagnosed with medulloblastoma brain tumor when he was only eight years old in 2015.

The young person, from Reading, was operated on to remove the masses, only to return to his spine in March last year.

His mother undertook to examine treatments after doctors reportedly told her they could do nothing more.

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Mrs. Ilsley came across online targeted radiotherapy, called CyberKnife. The NHS has since said that this & # 39; not clinically appropriate & # 39; is for Charlie & # 39; s cancer.

After raising £ 100,000 ($ 121,110) for treatment in Turkey, Charlie has reportedly received full permission from the same doctors who said his tumors were untreatable 18 months ago.

Mrs. Ilsley believes that if she had listened to the doctors & # 39; Charlie would not be here now & # 39 ;.

Charlie Ilsley flew to Turkey for a treatment for brain cancer that is not available on the NHS

Charlie Ilsley flew to Turkey for a treatment for brain cancer that is not available on the NHS

The youngster underwent many rounds of chemo, as well as & # 39; targeted radiotherapy & # 39 ;, known as CyberKnife. His mother came across the treatment online after doctors reportedly told her there was nothing they could do to stop her son from spreading once it reached its backbone
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The youngster underwent many rounds of chemo, as well as & # 39; targeted radiotherapy & # 39 ;, known as CyberKnife. His mother came across the treatment online after doctors reportedly told her there was nothing they could do to stop her son from spreading once it reached its backbone

The youngster underwent many rounds of chemo, as well as & # 39; targeted radiotherapy & # 39 ;, known as CyberKnife. His mother came across the treatment online after doctors reportedly told her there was nothing they could do to stop her son from spreading once it reached its backbone

Speaking of the doctors' initial prognosis, Mrs. Ilsley told the BBC: & # 39; If I had listened to them, Charlie wouldn't be here right now – I shouldn't think about that.

& # 39; When Charlie had his first scan in Turkey and the first treatment was working, I remember feeling very happy.

& # 39; And then (I felt) angry that this could not be done in my own country. & # 39;

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Once the brain tumor was diagnosed, Charlie underwent emergency surgery to remove the mass, followed by & # 39; many rounds of radiation & # 39; and four stem cell transplants, according to his GoFundMe page.

The juvenile recovered well until tumors were later discovered in two places on his spine.

Charlie then underwent two rounds of chemo, but his tumors still doubled in size.

Ms. Ilsley claims that doctors at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford told her family that there was nothing they could do to prevent Charlie's cancer from spreading.

She refused to accept the prognosis and arranged for her son to go to Memorial Hospital in Ankara, Turkey, where £ 30,000 ($ 36,385) was charged for the treatment.

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Once there, each of Charlie & # 39; s two tumors underwent three rounds of CyberKnife radiotherapy, where he also received chemo.

The young person was able to return home for a short while before fleeing again for a second and third course of treatment.

Charlie's & # 39; s family had to & # 39; make some extra payments & # 39; to cover the costs of medicines that prevent the side effects he had previously suffered.

An MRI scan showed that Charlie & # 39; s tumors are shrinking, but he still needed two chemo cycles and one stem cell transplant.

The transplant added quite a lot to the costs & # 39; but was needed to give him the best possible opportunity & # 39 ;.

Eighteen months later, the same doctors reportedly gave Charlie full permission
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Eighteen months later, the same doctors reportedly gave Charlie full permission

Eighteen months later, the same doctors reportedly gave Charlie full permission

Charlie & # 39; s mother Toni has raised £ 100,000 ($ 121,110) for treatment, as well as a stem cell transplant, medicines to prevent side effects and additional immunotherapy in Germany

Charlie & # 39; s mother Toni has raised £ 100,000 ($ 121,110) for treatment, as well as a stem cell transplant, medicines to prevent side effects and additional immunotherapy in Germany

Charlie & # 39; s mother Toni has raised £ 100,000 ($ 121,110) for treatment, as well as a stem cell transplant, medicines to prevent side effects and additional immunotherapy in Germany

After the procedure came an MRI scan & # 39; very positive & # 39; Charlie was even able to return to school part-time.

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To give him a & # 39; long-term remedy & # 39; the family then raised £ 40,000 ($ 48,523) for immunotherapy in Germany.

Immunotherapy is a form of cancer treatment that helps the immune system fight the disease.

During this time Charlie & # 39; s father Mark was diagnosed with & # 39; rare cancer & # 39; and he needed surgery.

Charlie and his mother did not want to postpone the treatment of the younger, last month to Germany.

Once home, Charlie checked at the John Radcliffe Hospital, where he received the good news. It is unclear how his father is doing.

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NHS England said it does not comment on individual cases, but said & # 39; decisions about correct treatment are difficult & # 39 ;.

It added the NHS funds that focus on lung cancer radiotherapy, but it is not always & # 39; clinically appropriate or better treatment & # 39; than therapies that are available from health care.

Donate to Charlie & # 39; s ongoing treatment here.

Charlies scans are & # 39; very positive & # 39; He returned and he is at school part-time

Charlies scans are & # 39; very positive & # 39; He returned and he is at school part-time

Charlies scans are & # 39; very positive & # 39; He returned and he is at school part-time

Mrs. Ilsley believes that if she had listened to doctors & # 39; Charlie would not be here now & # 39;
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Mrs. Ilsley believes that if she had listened to doctors & # 39; Charlie would not be here now & # 39;

Mrs. Ilsley believes that if she had listened to doctors & # 39; Charlie would not be here now & # 39;

WHAT IS THE CYBERKNIFE?

CyberKnife is a form of radiotherapy that focuses on the exact location of a tumor.

X-ray cameras check the position of a malignant mass, while sensors analyze the patient's breathing.

This allows a robot to position a beam of radiation therapy that is aimed at the tumor, while avoiding healthy surrounding tissue. The robot moves with the patient's breathing.

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Due to the accuracy of less than a millimeter, the CyberKnife makes it possible to administer larger doses of radiotherapy, resulting in fewer hospital visits for the patient.

Conventional radiotherapy provides radiation to both the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. This was necessary because the tumor movement was not followed during the treatment.

This increased the risk of damage to the healthy tissue, as well as other side effects.

CyberKnife can be suitable for certain brains, lungs, spine, liver, pancreas and prostate cancer. However, patients are selected case by case.

NHS England says the treatment & # 39; is not always clinically appropriate & # 39 ;.

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