Can you tell us who are these 4 celebrities behind the points?

Opticians have hidden the show using A-listers among the extravagant images to create awareness of the common condition

If you can not tell who these four celebrities are, it could be a sign that you are color blind.

Opticians have hidden the show using A-Listers among the extravagant images to raise awareness about the common condition.

Today they have warned those who struggle to identify the celebrities behind ads that may be colorblind and require more proof.

The Optical Express team devised its own version of the Ishihara plate test, developed by a Japanese teacher a century ago.

Opticians use it regularly to identify color vision deficiency, commonly known as colorblind.

Answers at the bottom

Opticians have hidden the show using A-listers among the extravagant images to create awareness of the common condition

Opticians have hidden the show using A-listers among the extravagant images to create awareness of the common condition

Today they have warned those who struggle to identify the celebrities behind the points that may be color blind and require more proof

Today they have warned those who struggle to identify the celebrities behind the points that may be color blind and require more proof

Today they have warned those who struggle to identify the celebrities behind the points that may be color blind and require more proof

Stephen Hannan, director of clinical services at Optical Express, said the test was created to boost the profile of the Color Blindness Awareness Day.

He said: "Despite being a harmless condition, we want to raise awareness about how common color deficiency can be and avoid being overlooked in schools, the workplace and everyday life.

Eliminating the stigma and providing more information about the condition will help those struggling to distinguish between certain colors to lead a normal and unrestricted life.

"Typical vision tests do not verify the color vision deficiency.

"However, if you are struggling to see the famous faces in our Ishihara test and you think you can be color blind, your optometrist can take you through a longer version of the Ishihara test or a color-matching task to diagnose the severity of your case. & # 39;

The figures suggest that there are almost three million Britons living with the condition, although the scores are not aware that they have it.

Most patients have difficulty differentiating certain colors from birth, but, in exceptional cases, they may develop later in life.

It is more common in men, affecting one in 12 men compared to one in 200 women, as it is often transmitted by parents through the X chromosome.

The Optical Express team devised its own version of the Ishihara plate test, developed by a Japanese teacher a century ago

The Optical Express team devised its own version of the Ishihara plate test, developed by a Japanese teacher a century ago

The Optical Express team devised its own version of the Ishihara plate test, developed by a Japanese teacher a century ago

Opticians use the Ishihara test to identify color vision deficiency, commonly known as color blindness

Opticians use the Ishihara test to identify color vision deficiency, commonly known as color blindness

Opticians use the Ishihara test to identify color vision deficiency, commonly known as color blindness

WHAT IS ISHIHARA'S PROOF AND HOW DOES IT WORK?

Dr. Shinobu Ishihara, a professor at the University of Tokyo, devised the idea of ​​testing red-green deficiencies in 1917.

His test, which bears his name, is now widely used by opticians, including those working in the NHS, as one of the main ways of diagnosing color blind patients.

It is not part of the routine eye test performed by opticians in the health service in the United Kingdom, which patients must have every two years.

The Ishihara tests the deficiencies of red-green color and consists of up to 38 plates or stained round images, which generally show a number or pattern in various colors.

Pseudoisochromatic plates usually consist of four different types of design: a disappearing design that can only be detected by those with good color vision, a transformation design that looks different from poor color, a hidden-digit design that is only visible for those who are color blind, and a classification design that can be used to detect red and green deficiency.

Being color blind does not have a direct impact on health, and most people adapt to the condition smoothly over time.

Notable celebrities such as Prince William, Keanu Reeves and Eddie Redmayne confessed to having a deficiency in color vision.

Most patients find it difficult to distinguish between red and green, and blue and yellow because the colors often seem much duller.

Opticians say that this makes it difficult for patients to distinguish between shades of purple, red, orange, yellow, brown and green.

Dr. Shinobu Ishihara, a professor at the University of Tokyo, devised the idea of ​​testing red-green deficiencies in 1917.

His test, which bears his name, is now widely used by opticians, including those working in the NHS, as one of the main ways to diagnose patients with this condition.

It is not part of the routine eye test performed by opticians in the health service in the United Kingdom, which patients must have every two years.

But patients concerned about their vision may request the identification of numbers contained in images composed of different colored dots if they wish.

It comes after the Department of Education in the United Kingdom recognized color blindness as a need for special education and a disability two years ago.

WHO ARE THE CELEBRITIES BEHIND THE POINTS?

Bono, leader of U2

Elton John, English singer, pianist and composer

Iris Apfel, fashion icon, business woman and interior designer

John Lennon, singer, composer and co-founder of The Beatles

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