WhatsNew2Day - Latest News And Breaking Headlines
Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Can you see what’s unusual about this glazed ham?

One of Australia’s most revered seafood chefs has transformed the traditional glazed ham – using kingfish instead of pork to make this delicious creation.

Josh Niland is the owner and chef behind Saint Peter in Paddington, New South Wales, an award-winning ‘seafood restaurant’ known for serving sustainably sourced, fresh seafood with attention to detail.

Since Christmas, he has been selling kingfish hams to his admiring customers – leaving behind people willing to trade their traditional pork shoulders.

Scroll down for video

This crispy skin kingfish ham fooled the Fish Butchery's customers - many thought it was a traditional Christmas ham

This crispy skin kingfish ham fooled the Fish Butchery’s customers – many thought it was a traditional Christmas ham

The fresh take on the traditional ham was created by renowned seafood chef Josh Niland

The fresh take on the traditional ham was created by renowned seafood chef Josh Niland

The fresh take on the traditional ham was created by renowned seafood chef Josh Niland

With a crunchy, glazed skin and pink flesh, they were marketed as ‘just amazing’ and it seemed people who tried it would agree.

“These are the best hams,” said one woman.

Others were eager to try the seafood from the traditional dish.

‘I don’t think fish has ever looked better. In all the history of people who ate fish for food, no one has made fish so tasty, ”one man said.

And pictures of the delicious looking piece of fish confused ham lovers.

“Is this fish or ham?” a woman asked.

The kingfish ham had many people wanting to switch for their Christmas lunch

The kingfish ham had many people wanting to switch for their Christmas lunch

The kingfish ham had many people wanting to switch for their Christmas lunch

“I explained this was pork before I saw it was you,” said another person

“I explained this was pork before I saw it was you,” said another person.

Poll

What would you prefer?

  • ‘Regular’ Christmas ham 2 votes
  • A kingfish Christmas ‘ham’ 1 votes

Other people as far away as America asked for recipes to recreate the Sydney chef’s dish at home.

Mr Niland often leaves people in awe of his incredible fish creations. He recently shared his tips for getting crisp skin every time.

To write for Good food, the 31-year-old former ‘Breakthrough Chef of the Year’ said the fish you choose should always be ‘ambient’ before being added to the hot pan and never placed straight from the fridge.

If it does, it will become ‘uneven’, making it more difficult to tell when it is cooked.

Josh Niland (pictured) is the owner and chef behind Saint Peter in Paddington, New South Wales, an award-winning 'seafood restaurant' known for serving sustainably sourced, fresh seafood

Josh Niland (pictured) is the owner and chef behind Saint Peter in Paddington, New South Wales, an award-winning 'seafood restaurant' known for serving sustainably sourced, fresh seafood

Josh Niland (pictured) is the owner and chef behind Saint Peter in Paddington, New South Wales, an award-winning ‘seafood restaurant’ known for serving sustainably sourced, fresh seafood

To get the skin ‘crunchy’, Josh uses a small amount of ghee that he removes from the pan after two minutes before adding more at the end of the cooking process.

Ghee is clarified butter with a high smoke point that is great for baking and creates a ‘rich’ and ‘nutty’ flavor in cooking.

He always uses one too weight of the fish (his own Saint Peter brand) when cooking and says it would be ‘impossible’ to properly fry or grill a fish without it.

“When you fry a fish on the skin in the pan, the heat generated will move the skin upward by the muscle of the fish and place it on the surface of the weight,” he said.

To get the skin 'crunchy', Josh uses a small amount of ghee which he removes from the pan after two minutes before adding more at the end of the cooking process

To get the skin 'crunchy', Josh uses a small amount of ghee which he removes from the pan after two minutes before adding more at the end of the cooking process

To get the skin ‘crunchy’, Josh uses a small amount of ghee which he removes from the pan after two minutes before adding more at the end of the cooking process

On his website, Josh describes his $ 150 weight as an “essential tool” for crispy fish with skin and a way to create “an even golden color” across the fillet.

This very gently secures the top of the fillet and forces the skin to have direct contact with the pan. Using a weight on thin to thick fillets allows you to cook the fish from raw to cooked on the stove and relies less on the oven to finish it up. ‘

He says a small, heavy saucepan filled with water is an alternative when weight isn’t available.

On his website, Josh describes his $ 150 weight as an “essential tool” for crispy fish with skin and a way to create “an even golden color” across the fillet.

He shares more tips for cooking fish perfectly in his own The whole fish cookbook ($ 55).

Josh isn’t the only chef with tricks for creating crispy skin, with MasterChef Australia star Georgia Barnes making crispy-skinned salmon by first patting the fillet with a paper towel to remove moisture.

Writing for Good Food, the 31-year-old former 'Breakthrough Chef of the Year' said the fish you choose should always be 'ambient' before adding to the hot pan and never placed straight from the fridge

Writing for Good Food, the 31-year-old former 'Breakthrough Chef of the Year' said the fish you choose should always be 'ambient' before adding to the hot pan and never placed straight from the fridge

Writing for Good Food, the 31-year-old former ‘Breakthrough Chef of the Year’ said the fish you choose should always be ‘ambient’ before adding to the hot pan and never placed straight from the fridge

Josh isn't the only chef with tricks for making crispy skin, with MasterChef Australia star Georgia Barnes making crispy skin-on salmon by first patting the fillet with a paper towel to remove moisture

Josh isn't the only chef with tricks for making crispy skin, with MasterChef Australia star Georgia Barnes making crispy skin-on salmon by first patting the fillet with a paper towel to remove moisture

'There is an even cooking line in the salmon, with a pink center and crispy skin. That's exactly what we want, a perfectly cooked piece of salmon, 'she said, before letting it rest for five minutes and serving it

'There is an even cooking line in the salmon, with a pink center and crispy skin. That's exactly what we want, a perfectly cooked piece of salmon, 'she said, before letting it rest for five minutes and serving it

Josh isn’t the only chef with tricks for making crispy skin, with MasterChef Australia star Georgia Barnes making crispy skin-on salmon by first patting the fillet with a paper towel to remove moisture

Appears in episode 2 of The Chef’s Secret: Cooking with Natural Gas on Bright-r.com.au, she then adds sea salt and black pepper and cooks it on a gas hob to keep the temperature under control.

“A drizzle of olive oil in the skillet helps the skin get perfectly crispy,” she said.

Over medium heat, Georgia and then the salmon, skin side down, press each fillet to make sure the skin is flat against the bottom of the pan and cook the salmon for two to three minutes on each side.

‘There is an even cooking line in the salmon, with a pink center and crispy skin. That’s exactly what we want, a perfectly cooked piece of salmon, ”she said, before letting it rest for five minutes and serving it.

.