Campaigners supported by The Mail on Sunday stop the historic park that is being curbed by luxury homes

Win! Campaigners supported by The Mail on Sunday stop the historic park that is being curbed by luxury homes

  • Calderstones Park in Liverpool is saved from a multi-million home plan
  • The High Court ruled Friday in favor of the cheering demonstrators
  • Caroline Williams said: "The park will exist for future generations to enjoy & # 39;
  • More than 50,000 people supported the request to save the park

Michael Powell

and
Peter Henn for the mail on Sunday

Campaigners backed by The Mail on Sunday greeted a stunning victory after the Supreme Court rejected plans to build dozens of luxury homes in a historic park.

The plan for multi-million pound development at Calderstones Park in Liverpool was successfully challenged in a legal assessment.

Jubilant protesters – supported by our Save Our Parks campaign – celebrated the dramatic decision on Friday.

Campaigners, including Caroline Williams, celebrated their victory last Friday in saving Calderstones Park in Liverpool from its development

Campaigners, including Caroline Williams, celebrated their victory last Friday in saving Calderstones Park in Liverpool from its development

As we reported last year, the mayor of Liverpool, Joe Anderson, supported the plans to build the 51 luxury homes. In a bitter row he accused campaigners of "smears and lies", as revealed in a leaked letter to local members of the Labor Party.

More than 50,000 people signed a petition against the scheme and campaign leaders raised thousands of pounds to conduct the legal battle.

The Calderstones and Harthill estates, historically linked to two of the world's largest shipping lines, Cunard and the Bibby Line, were purchased by the city council early last century to create a cleaner environment for Liverpudlians.

Calderstones Park opened in 1905 and is spread over more than 120 hectares of South Liverpool. It has an impressive variety of woods, including a 1000-year-old tree, and also features a lake, a botanical garden and the historic Calderstones House mansion built in the 1820s for the lead shot manufacturer Joseph Need Walker.

The City Council of Liverpool had argued that the development by Redrow in the adjacent estate Harthill was not part of the park. Aldermen in Liverpool voted to build on the park in February 2017.

If the development of luxury homes had continued, 13 hectares of the city's park would have been lost. An accredited manege center and popular model railroad would have been moved.

The story of The Mail on Sunday that was presented last October about the park under threat

The story of The Mail on Sunday that was presented last October about the park under threat

The story of The Mail on Sunday that was presented last October about the park under threat

But after the Supreme Court ruled that the area was an open space and indeed was part of the park, Labor veteran Mr Anderson gave a defeat and said the council would not appeal. In a statement he said: & # 39; The first thing to say is that the Harthill plan is dead. It will not be resurrected in any other form. & # 39;

Caroline Williams, a retired teacher who organized protests against development, said she was happy that the mayor & # 39; had finally seen the realization & # 39; She said: "I am very happy that the campaign has succeeded in saving our park. I want to thank the team and the thousands of supporters without whom we could not have won. It is amazing to think that the park will exist for future generations to enjoy. & # 39;

John Davies, a director of a community group named Liverpool Open and Green Spaces, who has brought the judicial review, said: "I am very glad that we have won. We have spent a lot of time and money on this. We are not professionals. We do this from our passion for our parks. & # 39;

More than 50,000 petitions signed a petition against the housing plan to protect the park that dates from 1905

More than 50,000 petitions signed a petition against the housing plan to protect the park that dates from 1905

More than 50,000 petitions signed a petition against the housing plan to protect the park that dates from 1905

The judicial review found that a crucial report from Liverpool's own conservation officials had not been disclosed to them before they voted in favor of the scheme.

In his opinion Judge Kerr said that the council had been wrong in the report and said that the advice of the planning officers & # 39; strongly biased & # 39; was in favor of council members who granted approval.

The Mail on Sunday campaign demands new rules and investments to protect park parks of the municipality, including banning development on or improper use of parks.

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