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The Cambridge University catering service has reduced its carbon footprint by nearly 11 percent by removing beef and lamb from its menus. Pictured, King & # 39; s College, Cambridge

The Cambridge University catering service has reduced its carbon footprint by nearly 11 percent by removing beef and lamb from its menus.

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Since the disposal of red meat in favor of more vegetable dishes, the catering team has also seen its profit rise by two percent.

The changes only affect food that is provided by the university catering service, but not the meals that are eaten in the individual dining rooms of the college.

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The Cambridge University catering service has reduced its carbon footprint by nearly 11 percent by removing beef and lamb from its menus. Pictured, King & # 39; s College, Cambridge

The Cambridge University catering service has reduced its carbon footprint by nearly 11 percent by removing beef and lamb from its menus. Pictured, King & # 39; s College, Cambridge

WHAT COOKS AT CAMBRIDGE UNI?

Typical options on the menu in the dining room of the University Center include:

  • Eggplant Rogan Josh
  • Breaded pork escalope
  • Pumpkin lasagna
  • Roast chicken
An eggplant stew made by UCS chefs
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An eggplant stew made by UCS chefs

An eggplant stew made by UCS chefs

The menu changes have been made by the University Catering Service (UCS), which operates 14 branches throughout the university and organizes more than 1500 hospitality events every year.

The catering service reports a 33 percent reduction in CO2 emissions per kilo of food purchased, in addition to a 28 percent reduction in land use per kilo of food.

Overall, the CO2 emissions from the catering service have been reduced by 10.5 percent, the BBC reported.

& # 39; Sustainability is extremely important for our students and staff & # 39 ;, said UCS head of operations Nick White.

& # 39; We wanted to ensure that we not only responded to their needs, but also pushed what was considered possible in a catering environment. & # 39;

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& # 39; It was about making sacrifices, but it was absolutely the right thing to do. It's about making the right choice easy. & # 39;

The menu changes fall under the impetus of the university's sustainable food policy, introduced in 2016.

This promotes a reduction in meat consumption, increases the availability of vegetable options, minimizes food waste and removes non-sustainable fish from the menu.

A typical menu in the large dining room of the University Center now includes options such as aubergine rogan josh and butternut squash lasagne.

University chefs were given vegan cooking classes to help them aboard the new environmentally-friendly menu – and even took a trip to London's Borough Market in the hope of promoting ideas for new vegetable dishes.

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In the meantime, cafe managers received training on sustainability.

Since the disposal of red meat in favor of more vegetable dishes, the catering team has also seen its profit rise by two percent. Pictured, one of the moving hamburgers from Moving Mountain, whose main ingredients are mushrooms and beetroot, sold by the catering service

Since the disposal of red meat in favor of more vegetable dishes, the catering team has also seen its profit rise by two percent. Pictured, one of the moving hamburgers from Moving Mountain, whose main ingredients are mushrooms and beetroot, sold by the catering service

Since the disposal of red meat in favor of more vegetable dishes, the catering team has also seen its profit rise by two percent. Pictured, one of the moving hamburgers from Moving Mountain, whose main ingredients are mushrooms and beetroot, sold by the catering service

The menu changes have been made by the University Catering Service, which operates 14 branches throughout the university and organizes more than 1500 hospitality events every year. Pictured, a deconstructed moussaka with eggplant, mushrooms, lentils and a tomato-based sauce

The menu changes have been made by the University Catering Service, which operates 14 branches throughout the university and organizes more than 1500 hospitality events every year. Pictured, a deconstructed moussaka with eggplant, mushrooms, lentils and a tomato-based sauce

The menu changes have been made by the University Catering Service, which operates 14 branches throughout the university and organizes more than 1500 hospitality events every year. Pictured, a deconstructed moussaka with eggplant, mushrooms, lentils and a tomato-based sauce

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& # 39; We are delighted that Cambridge has taken action to improve its environmental and animal welfare credentials & # 39 ;, said Charlie Huson of the Humane Society International.

& (39) (We have) worked with Cambridge for the past two years to organize vegan workshops for their chefs to help them improve the university's vegetable supply, and it is great to see that these are fruits in terms of CO2 emissions and saved animal lives. & # 39;

& # 39; We hope that Cambridge will continue its compassionate culinary journey and that other universities and institutions will follow the example and recognize the benefits to the environment, animals and humans of placing more plants on plates. & # 39 ;

The catering service reports a 33 percent reduction in CO2 emissions per kilo of food purchased, in addition to a 28 percent reduction in land use per kilo of food

The catering service reports a 33 percent reduction in CO2 emissions per kilo of food purchased, in addition to a 28 percent reduction in land use per kilo of food

The catering service reports a 33 percent reduction in CO2 emissions per kilo of food purchased, in addition to a 28 percent reduction in land use per kilo of food

In general, the CO2 emissions from the catering service have been reduced by 10.5 percent. In the photo chef Gabor Raub from the Catering department prepares the new meals
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In general, the CO2 emissions from the catering service have been reduced by 10.5 percent. In the photo chef Gabor Raub from the Catering department prepares the new meals

In general, the CO2 emissions from the catering service have been reduced by 10.5 percent. In the photo chef Gabor Raub from the Catering department prepares the new meals

The service has used subtle & # 39; nudge & # 39; techniques to encourage customers to enjoy the new menu items – such as by placing vegan and vegetarian options before meat in the canteen.

& # 39; If you go to most restaurants, they put a "V" for vegetarian or call it something vegan, & # 39; said catering manager Paula White.

& # 39; We didn't do that, we just put what's inside.

& # 39; You use your eyes, your nose. If you look at something and think "wow, that looks good", you don't first think "is there beef in it?" & # 39;

The changes have also proved financially sound, with the UCS increasing its gross profit by 2 percent between 2014-2015 and 2017-2018, despite rising food costs.

The menu changes fall under the impulse of the university's sustainable food policy, introduced in 2016. Pictured, one of the moving hot dogs from Moving Mountain, sold by the catering service

The menu changes fall under the impulse of the university's sustainable food policy, introduced in 2016. Pictured, one of the moving hot dogs from Moving Mountain, sold by the catering service

The menu changes fall under the impulse of the university's sustainable food policy, introduced in 2016. Pictured, one of the moving hot dogs from Moving Mountain, sold by the catering service

A typical menu in the large dining room of the University Center now includes options such as aubergine rogan josh and butternut squash lasagne. Pictured, salads sold by the UCS

A typical menu in the large dining room of the University Center now includes options such as aubergine rogan josh and butternut squash lasagne. Pictured, salads sold by the UCS

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A typical menu in the large dining room of the University Center now includes options such as aubergine rogan josh and butternut squash lasagne. Pictured, salads sold by the UCS

& # 39; University catering managers have drastically reduced the ecological footprint of their activities, & # 39; said Andrew Balmford, natural scientist at the University of Cambridge, who advised on the changes.

The UCS has achieved this, he noted, by removing ruminant meat from its menus, reducing food wastage and eliminating unsustainably harvested fish – while increasing sales and profits. ;

& # 39; It is difficult to propose other interventions that can deliver such dramatic benefits in such a short period of time. & # 39;

In addition to changes to menus, the UCS has also stopped selling single-use plastic bottles – an expected move will cause more than 30,000 plastic bottles to end up in landfills each year.

University chefs were given vegan cooking classes to help them on board with the new environmentally-friendly menu. Pictured canapes of blue cheese and pecans made by UCS chefs
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University chefs were given vegan cooking classes to help them on board with the new environmentally-friendly menu. Pictured canapes of blue cheese and pecans made by UCS chefs

University chefs were given vegan cooking classes to help them on board with the new environmentally-friendly menu. Pictured canapes of blue cheese and pecans made by UCS chefs

VEGETARIAN DIETS REALLY LOWER YOUR CHOLESTEROL

Vegetable diets really lower cholesterol, according to an overview of nearly 50 studies.

Vegetarians generally eat more vegetables, fruits and nuts, which means they have a lower intake of saturated fat, researchers found.

These foods are naturally rich in components such as soluble fiber, soy protein and plant sterols (a cholesterol in plants), all of which have a lower cholesterol level.

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From the research led by Dr. Yoko Yokoyama, from Keio University in Fujisawa, found that vegetarians had 29.2 milligrams less cholesterol per deciliter (one tenth of a liter) than meat eaters.

Vegetarian diets lower cholesterol because they result in a lower intake of saturated fat, an increased intake of vegetable foods such as vegetables, fruit and nuts (stock image)

Vegetarian diets lower cholesterol because they result in a lower intake of saturated fat, an increased intake of vegetable foods such as vegetables, fruit and nuts (stock image)

Vegetarian diets lower cholesterol because they result in a lower intake of saturated fat, an increased intake of vegetable foods such as vegetables, fruit and nuts (stock image)

For the assessment, researchers & # 39; vegetarian diets & # 39; intended as a diet where meat products are eaten less than once a month.

For meat eaters, following a vegetarian diet could lower cholesterol by 12.5 milligrams per deciliter.

& # 39; Those (individuals) who have followed vegetarian dietary patterns for extended periods of time may have healthier body compositions and better adherence to a vegetarian diet, both of which may have an effect on blood lipids & # 39 ;, wrote researchers in the newspaper published in the newspaper magazine Nutrition reviews.

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