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Calls for traditional uniforms for women, as the number of women receiving the industry is increasing

Female traditions prefer work clothes designed for them – they call current series poorly fitting and dangerous as more women enter the industry

  • Poorly fitting uniforms can jeopardize female traditions at work
  • Research has shown that 9/10 female traditions struggled to find protective work clothes
  • The biggest problem was hooking loose clothing on equipment

Female traditions say that men’s clothing that is used at workplaces is more than ill-suited, but could endanger women.

Research by Bisley Workwear showed that nine out of ten female traditions struggled to find protective workwear that fits well.

Major problems are loose clothing that hooks onto ladders and frustrations when trying to remove an overall in a portaloo.

Of the women surveyed, a third thought they could not work so hard in ill-fitting uniforms.

Almost half of all respondents took their own casual clothes at workplaces instead of good work clothes.

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New equipment has been created that is more in line with a feminine design to eliminate the risks associated with women who wear men's workwear

New equipment has been created that is more in line with a feminine design to eliminate the risks associated with women who wear men’s workwear

Former Block participant Kara Demmich told the Today Show when she first appeared that she was enthusiastic about the clothing options, but soon encountered problems.

“I received a bag of clothing and I thought we had won the jackpot with free clothing, but they didn’t suit me. They were a bit big and if you’re on a work site and you climb beams, you want something that fits and doesn’t get caught, “she said.

Female landscape architect Coralie Stuart said that the life of clothing had also been a problem for her.

“If you have to climb a ladder and don’t wear equipment that fits well, it’s dangerous,” she said.

Research by Bisley Workwear has shown that nine out of ten female traditions struggle to find protective workwear that fits well

Research by Bisley Workwear has shown that nine out of ten female traditions struggle to find protective workwear that fits well

Research by Bisley Workwear has shown that nine out of ten female traditions struggle to find protective workwear that fits well

‘And the clothes that I wore through it within a few months and the men’s clothes don’t fit. So it’s good to have something that fits my body and doesn’t get caught in anything. ”

The research also showed that about 45 percent of the women surveyed felt self-conscious in uniforms that were not designed for the female body.

The increasing number of women working in trade and research on work clothes has led to changes in uniforms.

New equipment has been created that is more in line with a feminine design to eliminate the risks associated with women who wear men’s workwear.

A new clothing line from Bisley Workewear has been designed from the outset to match the body shape of women

A new clothing line from Bisley Workewear has been designed from the outset to match the body shape of women

A new clothing line from Bisley Workewear has been designed from the outset to match the body shape of women

The director of Bisley, told David Gazal the Australian that women’s clothing has traditionally been adapted from men with very few changes.

“So then we got a man’s silhouette and a men’s garment, and we got down on our knees and pleats and called it a women’s style. It still didn’t fit, but we called it a women’s style. ”

But he said the company’s new female workwear was designed for women from the start.

“When we put together this range, we put it together knowing that the garment needs a completely different silhouette and a completely different fabric,” Gazal said.

‘Dust needs stretch, it needs portability and functionality in the workplace. It must be sustainable and not restrictive. “

Former Block participant Kara Demmich (photo in the middle) and female landscape architect Coralie Stuart have both encountered difficulties in finding suitable workwear

Former Block participant Kara Demmich (photo in the middle) and female landscape architect Coralie Stuart have both encountered difficulties in finding well-fitting work clothes.

Former Block participant Kara Demmich (photo in the middle) and female landscape architect Coralie Stuart have both encountered difficulties in finding well-fitting work clothes.

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