California teacher claims parents who want kids to go back to school are WHITE TOPS

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Damian Harmony (above), who teaches at John F. Kennedy High School in Sacramento, made the comments to the school board

Damian Harmony (above), who teaches at John F. Kennedy High School in Sacramento, made the comments to the school board

A California teacher seemed to suggest that parents who want to send their children back to school are white supremacists who have “bullied a board to make schools less safe for teachers and children.”

Damian Harmony, who teaches Latin at John F. Kennedy High School in Sacramento, made the comments to the school board.

He later posted the content on Facebook, but it was removed from his page as of Tuesday morning.

During his comments, Harmony said, “I come to you as a grateful parent. I am grateful to have kept my children at home. And I am especially grateful for what I heard from parents last week. Until then, the Next Door app was the only way I could measure the level of white supremacy in my neighborhood.

‘The people who are shouting that a district have legally agreed to violate MOU with teachers who are going to teach their own children, who treat the efforts of the teachers as if they were not exhaustive and have always been present, while also being a pandemic themselves, made it a lot easier. ‘

Harmony continued, “ I’m equally disappointed if not surprised that last week we all had to hear all the cynical, pearl-grabbing, fake-urge, skilled, structurally white supremacist, hysteria, even as teachers moved forward with an MOU that already put them in danger and asked of a beleaguered group of professionals. ‘

He went on to accuse them of “teasing a school board to make the schools less safe for the teachers and children.”

And it almost succeeded by making two of its members complicit – who still meet virtually, but decide that others should meet in person. You have tried to bully a school board for acting in bad faith with your children’s teachers. ‘

During his comments, Harmony gave the parents insisting on personal instruction to return

During his comments, Harmony gave the parents insisting on personal instruction to return

During his comments, Harmony gave the parents insisting on personal instruction to return

‘This is who you are. Our children are watching, and you have shown them and your teachers that you value neither. During a pandemic. God help all of us if there is one more, because you certainly won’t, ”Harmony added.

Some groups, including Reopen California Schools, responded to the post by demanding an apology from the district officials.

An @ officialSCUSD teacher in Sacramento publicly calls parents white supremacists and bullies advocating for personal learning. I thought we were done with this. @officialSCUSD, make sure the parents in your ward get an apology, ” the group tweeted on Sunday.

A spokesman for the Sacramento City Unified School District said Fox news that Harmony’s comments “were made not in his capacity as a Sacramento City Unified School District district officer, but in his personal capacity and through the public comment section at another school district’s board meeting on that district’s reopening plan.”

“The tone and feel of his personal statement does not reflect official views or policies of Sacramento City Unified School District,” the spokesman added.

On March 20, the Sacramento City Unified School District announced it will be ready to welcome students back to personal learning by April 8.

“ The district is moving forward with the reopening of the Return Together Plan and has reached an agreement with the Sacramento City Teachers Association after months of negotiation, ” the district said. Sacramento City Unified will be one of the last districts in the region to return to personal instruction.

Getting students back into the classroom has been a fraught issue nationwide, pitting politicians against powerful teacher unions.

On March 20, the Sacramento City Unified School District announced it will be ready to welcome students back to personal learning by April 8.  Harmony teaches at John F. Kennedy High School

On March 20, the Sacramento City Unified School District announced it will be ready to welcome students back to personal learning by April 8.  Harmony teaches at John F. Kennedy High School

On March 20, the Sacramento City Unified School District announced it will be ready to welcome students back to personal learning by April 8. Harmony teaches at John F. Kennedy High School

Earlier this month, Gavin Newsom government signed a law allowing California public schools to tap $ 6.6 billion in an effort to pressure districts to reopen classrooms.

After nearly a year of distance learning for most K-12 students during the coronavirus pandemic, parents in the country’s most populous state say they are frustrated and lose hope that their kids will see the inside of a classroom this year.

The law does not require school districts to resume personal instruction. Instead, the state is dangling $ 2 billion from money-tight school boards, offering a share only if they start offering personal instructions by the end of the month. The rest of the money would be used to help students catch up.

Teachers from some of the largest districts have come against it, saying schools cannot reopen until infection rates have fallen and enough educators have been vaccinated.

Among them are the powerful United Teachers of Los Angeles, whose members voted to reject what they called an unsafe return for the country’s second-largest district.

The union rejected the reopening plan as “a recipe for propagating structural racism” by taking advantage of richer, whiter areas with lower contamination rates.

“This vote indicates that in these most difficult times our members will not accept hasty returns that would endanger the safety of educators, students and families,” said union leader Cecily Myart-Cruz.

While California businesses have opened and closed due to the ups and downs of the pandemic, many school boards were unwilling to send students back to classrooms as they grappled with the cost of implementing safety standards and negotiating with teachers’ unions.

OpenSchoolsCA, a parent group that has advocated for personal education, called the legislation “ another failed attempt ” to reopen classrooms, which won’t be enough to convince many districts, especially in big cities.

The new law also sets aside $ 4.6 billion for all districts to help students catch up, 85 percent of which should be used for personal learning.