Home US California Man who lives in cliffside mansion REFUSES to move despite experts warning his $16million home and others could slide into the ocean during future storms

California Man who lives in cliffside mansion REFUSES to move despite experts warning his $16million home and others could slide into the ocean during future storms

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Multimillion-dollar homes teetering on the edge of a cliff in Southern California have been deemed safe to live in.

Multimillion-dollar homes teetering on the edge of a cliff in Southern California have been deemed safe to live in, even though a landslide swept mud and debris across the structure.

Historic storms that flooded the Golden State earlier this month triggered a landslide that put three mansions in Dana Point at risk of falling into the Pacific Ocean.

A large chunk of the cliff fell at the foot of the complex’s most expensive home, a four-bedroom behemoth valued at $15.9 million registered to a local radiologist, 82-year-old Lewis Bruggeman, records show.

“The house is fine, it is not threatened and will not receive a red tag,” Bruggeman said. calories. “The city agrees that there is no major structural problem with the house.”

Dana Point City Manager Mike Killebrew said, “Currently the city has confirmed that there is no imminent threat to that home.”

Multimillion-dollar homes teetering on the edge of a cliff in Southern California have been deemed safe to live in.

Multimillion-dollar homes teetering on the edge of a cliff in Southern California have been deemed safe to live in.

California Man who lives in cliffside mansion REFUSES to move

California Man who lives in cliffside mansion REFUSES to move

Lewis Bruggeman (pictured), owner of the complex’s most expensive home, a four-bedroom behemoth valued at $15.9 million, said: “The house is fine, not threatened and will not be red-tagged.”

The historic storms that flooded the Golden State earlier this month caused a landslide that put three mansions in Dana Point at risk of falling into the Pacific Ocean.

The historic storms that flooded the Golden State earlier this month caused a landslide that put three mansions in Dana Point at risk of falling into the Pacific Ocean.

The historic storms that flooded the Golden State earlier this month caused a landslide that put three mansions in Dana Point at risk of falling into the Pacific Ocean.

‘The city’s geotechnical engineer and a construction sector went to the scene to evaluate the situation, as well as talk with the owner of the residence and the slope where the failure occurred.’

California has been experiencing one of the wettest Februarys on record, as flooding, mudslides and storm warnings hit the state.

While officials said Dana Point’s cliffside properties are safe to live in, some experts feel a lot of work will need to be done to keep them safe from future storms.

“There will be very, very significant work that will be needed to stabilize that property,” said Kyle Tourj√©, executive vice president of Alpha Structural, a Los Angeles engineering firm. Washington Post.

‘We are seeing more damage and I think we will continue to see more significant damage. Between consecutive years of heavy saturation, these houses, these properties… they simply cannot withstand this type of blow.’

The Bruggeman residence is part of a trio of cliffside homes in the affluent region. The three remain in their precarious location next to the Ocean Institute, another popular tourist attraction.

The face of the missing cliff slid past a $12.8 million residence, owned by contracting magnate Guy Yocom, 66, which sits slightly lower and fortunately remained in place.

A third home, valued at $13 million and belonging to local producer Marketta Karsikko-Gassel, 80, appeared to be in better condition, although just a few feet away – and a few hundred feet above the sea – it was still standing. is on unstable ground.

The Dana Point collapse is simply the latest in a series of incidents that have besieged Southern California in recent weeks.

The Dana Point collapse is simply the latest in a series of incidents that have besieged Southern California in recent weeks. In the photo: a landslide in San Clemente

The Dana Point collapse is simply the latest in a series of incidents that have besieged Southern California in recent weeks. In the photo: a landslide in San Clemente

The Dana Point collapse is simply the latest in a series of incidents that have besieged Southern California in recent weeks. In the photo: a landslide in San Clemente

There were landslides along the oceanfront cliffs in San Clemente (pictured), a few miles away, resulting in the closure of the city's beach trails, mainly on the north end of the city.

There were landslides along the oceanfront cliffs in San Clemente (pictured), a few miles away, resulting in the closure of the city's beach trails, mainly on the north end of the city.

There were landslides along the oceanfront cliffs in San Clemente (pictured), a few miles away, resulting in the closure of the city’s beach trails, mainly on the north end of the city.

California has been experiencing one of the wettest Februarys on record as flood warnings, mudslides and storms hit the state.

California has been experiencing one of the wettest Februarys on record as flood, mudslide and storm warnings hit the state.

California has been experiencing one of the wettest Februarys on record as flood warnings, mudslides and storms hit the state.

More rain is forecast in the area early this week. The National Weather Service predicts there is a chance of light rain and snow in the mountains starting Monday afternoon into early Tuesday.

More rain is forecast in the area early this week. The National Weather Service predicts there is a chance of light rain and snow in the mountains starting Monday afternoon into early Tuesday.

More rain is forecast in the area early this week. The National Weather Service predicts there is a chance of light rain and snow in the mountains starting Monday afternoon into early Tuesday.

That same day, 13 miles south along the Pacific Coast, part of a dead end on Columbo Avenue fell about five feet after a landslide that sent debris flying at least 150 feet below.

There were also landslides along oceanfront bluffs in San Clemente, a few miles away, resulting in the closure of the city’s beach trails.

Stairs leading to the coastal path at Dije Court, El Portal and Lasuen Beach were added last week to the list of closed access points due to continued instability in the area.

More rain is forecast in the area early this week. The National Weather Service predicts there is a chance of light rain and snow in the mountains starting Monday afternoon into early Tuesday.

They estimate rainfall totals of a quarter of an inch or less in the Los Angeles area and warn that mudslides and rockslides will be possible.

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