California man sentenced to three years for selling toxic fertilizers as a diet pill on the internet

Con man who has earned $ 700,000 selling toxic fertilizers as an online diet pill is sentenced to three years

  • Scott Edward Cavell, 36, developed a plan to market and sell a toxic fertilizer known as 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) as a means of losing weight
  • He was sentenced to three years in prison, the Justice Ministry said
  • Cavell raised at least $ 763,000 for putting together cheap fertilizer into pills
  • He was previously affiliated with a Ponzi scheme dating back to the mortgage crisis
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A Californian man was sentenced to three years in prison for selling a toxic fertilizer online as a fat-burning pill, officials said.

Scott Edward Cavell, 36, has worked with others to develop a plan to use a medicine, 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), as a medicine for weight loss and & # 39; fat burner & # 39; to market and sell.

This is despite the fact that he knows that DNP has not been approved by the FDA as a substance for & # 39; human consumption & # 39 ;, according to Department of Justice.

DNP is used commercially to make dyes, wood preservatives and as fertilizer or pesticide. The chemical is toxic to humans.

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DNP is used commercially to make dyes, wood preservatives and as fertilizer or pesticide. The chemical is toxic to humans. Cavell worsened the drug into tradable pills

DNP is used commercially to make dyes, wood preservatives and as fertilizer or pesticide. The chemical is toxic to humans. Cavell worsened the drug into tradable pills

Cavell sold DNP pills on websites and claimed it was an artificial fertilizer, meaning that it is sold legally in other circumstances.

Cavell admitted that he operated websites that marketed the drug as a supplement and at the same time discouraged its use.

He continued to sell DNP pills on another website, thefertilizerwarehouse.com, with the aim of misleading misleading regulators from the US Food and Drug Administration.

According to court documents, Cavell collected at least $ 763,000 for putting together cheap fertilizer into pills for human consumption.

US lawyer McGregor W. Scott said: & Cavell thought he might mislead supervisors. He was wrong. It is a thing of the past for him to learn that we will ensure that these types of schedules are stopped to keep the community safe.

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& # 39; Medicines produced and distributed outside the supervision of the FDA offer the prospect of harming consumer health & # 39 ;, said special agent Lisa L. Malinowski of the FDA Criminal Investigation Office in Los Angeles.

& # 39; The FDA will continue to work to prevent the illegal online sale of dangerous, unapproved drugs and we want to protect consumers from criminals who put profits above the health and safety of the American public. & # 39;

Rafael Nunez of the US Postal Inspectorate in San Francisco said: & # 39; Postal inspectors have worked closely with the US law firm and our law enforcement partners, just like these to keep dangerous drugs out of the communities we serve. & # 39;

Cavell fled to Ireland after the prosecutors said he was part of one of the largest Ponzi schemes in the region dating back to the mortgage crisis of more than a decade ago.

According to documents from the US court, since 2006, he and his associates have been cheating on investors and mortgage companies of millions, including 500 houses and apartment buildings in various US states.

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He was arrested and held in Ireland by order of marijuana until he volunteered to return to the US. He then spent two years in prison in 2014, The Sacramento Bee reported.

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