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This image was made from images of an attack in Lancaster. It was an example of bystanders who intervened in an attack. At the bottom right a man dressed in a white shirt attacks another man lying on the floor. Some spectators observe

Would you help a total stranger? Study finds that bystanders & # 39; nine out of ten & # 39; come to the rescue to help someone who is being attacked

  • Researchers assessed real-world CCTV footage of 219 arguments and attacks
  • Studied real attacks in the cities of Lancaster, Amsterdam and Cape Town
  • Someone got involved to prevent an attack 91% of the time
  • This includes gesturing for an aggressor to calm, block or pull him away, or to comfort the victim
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Victims of abuse and aggressive behavior can rely on the friendliness of strangers to help them, according to a new study.

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It turned out that with more than nine out of ten attacks (91 percent) there will be at least one bystander who will intervene at some point.

An international team of psychologists studied 219 real conflicts that were recorded by CCTV in the cities of Lancaster, Amsterdam and Cape Town.

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This image was made from images of an attack in Lancaster. It was an example of bystanders who intervened in an attack. At the bottom right a man dressed in a white shirt attacks another man lying on the floor. Some spectators observe

This image was made from images of an attack in Lancaster. It was an example of bystanders who intervened in an attack. At the bottom right a man dressed in a white shirt attacks another man lying on the floor. Some spectators observe

WHAT IS IT & # 39; BYSTANDER EFFECT & # 39 ;?

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Half a century of research into the & # 39; bystander effect & # 39; concludes that individuals are less likely to intervene during an emergency situation when they are in the presence of others than when they are alone.

According to conventional wisdom, non-involvement is the standard response of bystanders during public emergencies.

A recent study has shown that this is not always the case.

The discovery tilts the impression of the & # 39; walk through society & # 39; and offers hope for the soul of humanity.

It also discovered that a person is more likely to involve themselves if there are more witnesses around.

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Main author Dr. Richard Philpot and colleagues investigated unique video recordings and found intervention methods including gestures for an aggressor to calm, block or pull them away or comfort the victim.

Remarkably, the results of the surveillance camera & # 39; s were comparable in all three countries.

This shows that the response & # 39; universal & # 39; is – restoring our confidence in human nature, the researchers say.

Dr. Philpot said: & # 39; According to conventional wisdom, non-involvement is the standard response of bystanders during public emergencies.

2 Bottom left two bystanders leave their standing positions and approach the parties to the conflict.

2 Bottom left two bystanders leave their standing positions and approach the parties to the conflict.

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2 Bottom left two bystanders leave their standing positions and approach the parties to the conflict.

3 The two bystanders are accompanied by others. A male bystander in a dark shirt and jeans pulls the head aggressor from his target, while a female bystander steps between the parties and extends both arms in a blocking motion

3 The two bystanders are accompanied by others. A male bystander in a dark shirt and jeans pulls the head aggressor from his target, while a female bystander steps between the parties and extends both arms in a blocking motion

3 The two bystanders are accompanied by others. A male bystander in a dark shirt and jeans pulls the head aggressor from his target, while a female bystander steps between the parties and extends both arms in a blocking motion

& # 39; Challenging against this view, the current cross-national study of video data shows that intervention is the norm in truly aggressive conflicts.

& # 39; The fact that bystanders are much more active than we think is a positive and reassuring story for potential victims of violence and the public as a whole.

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& # 39; We must develop crime prevention efforts that build on the willingness of bystanders to intervene. & # 39;

Half a century of research into the & # 39; bystander effect & # 39; concludes that individuals are less likely to intervene during an emergency situation when they are in the presence of others than when they are alone.

Dr. Philpot said: & although more people in the neighborhood can reduce the chance of help from a person – that is, the effect of the bystander – it also offers a larger pool from which care providers can be involved. & # 39;

The study also showed that there was no difference in the intervention rates between the three cities – although downtown Cape Town is generally considered less safe.

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