BX: How Zac Taylor was connected to UC, resonated with those who knew him well

Bengals Xtra is a weekly column by Enquirer beat writers Paul Dehner Jr. and Fletcher Page about developments around the Bengals football field and takes you to the front office, the dressing room and beyond.

Doug Rosfeld held the position of director of player development at the University of Cincinnati for three years. During the season, Zac Taylor took over as an attacking coordinator, working with him in any capacity every day.

sport

Vince Suriano also worked at UC during the Taylor season as an OC. He had been around the program for three years as an offensive assistant and director of high school and player relationships. He worked with quarterbacks for Taylor and was at every meeting that led the coach there.

Both know football. Rosenfeld is now the head coach at Moeller High School and Suriano, a legendary coach at Anderson High, as well as experience in the ranks of the college, since writing two books on the profession.

When asked about the Bengals head coach to be set up soon, the conversation starts almost every time Taylor’s name comes up for someone who knows him.

“He is a brilliant football brain,” said Rosenfeld.

Sean McVay said the same thing. This is no secret. There is a reason why someone of 35 years old as head coach in the NFL would be coupled and three different head coach interviews would go through.

The interesting element of evaluating Taylor through the lens of UC does not come from his advanced football intensity. On the contrary, the emotional intelligence and the ability to connect jumped off the page from those who watched him closely every day.

sport

“It is a unique feature that you can increase the level of football consultations in a room and not have it in a hostile, aggressive way,” Rosenfeld said. “I think that is a sign of a great coach, you can have the interactions that are useful and useful to a player and then develop coaches and people around them and get the best out of it.”

Indications of multiple sources within the Bengals indicate what you would expect, that Taylor was blowing away the recruitment committee in his interview last weekend in Los Angeles. They soon knew that he was their husband. And the reasoning goes much further than following the trend of advanced offensive football and merging the new school of how the game is played.

It goes back to the natural ability to teach and connect. Taylor showed those with whom he worked at UC three years ago.

“A very good communicator and teacher,” said Suriano, who learned his first-hand lessons when Taylor taught the coaching staff his attacking concepts on his arrival. “He was very fascinating, during a meeting you are involved in the meeting, it’s not just that he only teaches, the children were always busy with his meeting.”

Suriano suggests that Taylor will not enter the facility and will scream and shout and let everyone know that there is a new boss in the city.

“His personality, he is not really a big ego person,” said Suriano. “He’s trying to get people involved in what’s going on and people’s part in. In my opinion, when he comes in here, he’s not going to pretend he’s really important, he’s not a man with the I-really-important syndrome, he is an I’m-a-regular-guy type of person. ‘

The results did not show in his year at UC, where the 99th offensive ended and Tommy Tuberville was shown the door. Suriano points to an extremely young team that adapts to new players as part of the challenges of the transition. Few know that Taylor has recruited and sold the current quarterback Desmond Ridder for the Bearcats.

sport

In the rough last year of the Tuberville period, it is difficult to put all that on Taylor.

This will be a completely different ball game on the. NFL level.

Connecting to today’s generation of players also focuses on Taylor. That is the obvious seismic shift that goes along with this recruitment and assessing what is expected to be the staff members who stick around.

Yes, veteran NFL coordinators will be part of this comparison to filling in the blanks in Taylor’s resume, but what we know about UC’s Taylor is connecting all those different personalities and pieces together in his wheelhouse.

It goes back to the natural ability to teach and make contact. Taylor showed them with whom he worked at UC three years ago.

“A very good communicator and teacher,” said Suriano, who learned his first-hand lessons when Taylor attended the attacker’s attack concepts on arrival. “He was very fascinating, during a meeting you are involved in the meeting, it is not only that he only teaches, but the children were also always busy with his meeting.”

Suriano suggests that Taylor will not enter the facility and shout and shout and let everyone know that there is a new boss in the city.

“His personality, he is not really a big ego person,” said Suriano. “He tries to get people involved in what’s going on and in front of people, I think he’ll not pretend to be very important, he’s not a man with the I-really important syndrome, he is an I’m-a-regular-guy type of person. ‘

The results did not show in his year at UC, where the 99th offensive ended and Tommy Tuberville was shown the door. Suriano points to an extremely young team that adapts to new players as part of the challenges of the transition. Few know that Taylor has recruited and sold the current quarterback Desmond Ridder for the Bearcats.

In the rough last year of the Tuberville period, it is difficult to put all that on Taylor.

This will be a completely different ball game on the. NFL level.

Connecting with the current generation of players also focuses on Taylor. That is the obvious seismic shift that accompanies this recruitment and the assessment of what is expected to be the staff members who stick around.

Yes, veterinary NFL coordinators will be part of this equation to fill in the blanks in Taylor’s resume, but what we know about UC’s Taylor is connecting all those different personalities and pieces in his wheelhouse.