Bush denounces the GOP for being the party of ‘white Anglo-Saxon Protestantism’

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George W. Bush says Republicans will ‘win nothing’ if they stand up for ‘white Anglo-Saxon Protestantism’ and sues his own party for not being inclusive

  • Former President George W. Bush suggested the GOP should contact a more diverse coalition of voters if it wanted to return to power
  • “It’s not going to win,” Bush told The Dispatch podcast on Thursday, when it becomes the party of “white Anglo-Saxon Protestantism.”
  • Bush had been asked about an effort led by Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene to form a caucus in favor of ‘Anglo-Saxon political traditions’
  • Bush warned that if the GOP took that path in the coming years ‘there will be no party’
  • ‘You know, to me that basically says we want to be extinct,’ added the former Republican president
  • Bush goes round to promote his new painting book ‘Out of Many, One’, which showcases the American immigrant experience
  • ‘I was discouraged seeing some of the language associated with immigrants and I wanted to show a different side,’ he said

Former President George W. Bush suggested that the Republican Party should contact a more diverse coalition of voters if it wanted to return to power.

“ If your Republican party stands for exclusivity – you know, they used to be country clubs, now it’s apparently white Anglo-Saxon Protestantism – it’s not going to win anything, ” Bush said in an interview with The Dispatch podcast last week.

Bush is promoting his new painting book, Out of Many, One, which showcases stories of immigrants – his own way of pushing back the anti-immigrant rhetoric of former President Donald Trump’s administration.

Former President George W. Bush said in an interview on Thursday that the GOP is

Former President George W. Bush said in an interview on Thursday that the GOP is “not going to win anything” if it is only the party of “white Anglo-Saxon Protestantism.”

My whole point about all this immigration debate and things is, I think if we could appreciate life as precious and every life matters, that we are all God’s children, that the tone of the debate could be a little bit better all of a sudden, ‘ Bush told it hosts Sarah Isgur, a former spokeswoman for the GOP Justice Department, and Steve Hayes, the ex-editor of The Weekly Standard, on Thursday.

“I mean, I was discouraged seeing some of the language associated with immigrants and I wanted to show a different side,” he said later in the interview.

Isgur asked Bush about a recent initiative by far-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene to form an ‘America First’ House caucus in favor of ‘Anglo-Saxon political traditions’ regarding immigration.

Isgur asked if the GOP would follow that path for the next three to five years if Bush were still a member of the party.

“No, I would say there won’t be a party,” Bush replied. “You know, to me, that actually says we want to be extinct,” continues the former president, as Hayes suggested there were more Republicans now embracing those beliefs than when Bush was head of the party.

Bush had been asked about an effort led by GOP representative Marjorie Taylor Greene (pictured) to form a caucus in favor of 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions'

Bush had been asked about an effort led by GOP representative Marjorie Taylor Greene (pictured) to form a caucus in favor of ‘Anglo-Saxon political traditions’

Bush said he remained “proud” to be a Republican and hoped the GOP could return to power.

“I think the Republicans will get a second chance to rule, because I believe the Biden government is a unifying factor, especially in the fiscal area. So, you know, we’ll see, ”the ex-president said, with particular concern about inflation.

But he then issued his WASP warning.

In the same interview, Bush predicted that the best way to do something about immigration was to break a bill to pieces.

He said he blamed both Senate Democratic leaders and himself for not receiving a comprehensive immigration bill through Congress in 2006.

“In 2006, if I could blame it, it would be up to the Democratic leadership of the Senate who refused to pass a bill without the amendment process,” Bush said. “Now, the reason I say it’s sorry is because it’s my fault. I tried to reform Social Security before reforming immigration, ”the Republican continued.

Bush also blamed people smuggling migrants across borders more than the Biden administration for the current crisis.

“I think the change of government has allowed the coyotes and the propagandists and the exploiters to say, ‘Okay, now we can get you in,” Bush said.

Bush also told the podcast that he agreed with the three-time guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial.

“Floyd’s statement makes me give the grade, you know, A. Because I think the trial was fair and justice was served,” Bush said.

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