Bungle leaves Australian vaccine recipients with inadequate doses of the Pfizer shots

Extraordinary hospital illness leaves Australians unvaccinated after getting wrong doses of the Pfizer jab. had gotten

  • Administrative bite ensures that 159 people still have to get a vaccination
  • Incident occurred on July 21 at Rockhampton Hospital in Central Queensland
  • Up to six patients in hospital received an ‘ultra low’ dose of the Pfizer jab
  • It is impossible to locate the six cases out of the dozen that were vaccinated

More than 150 Australians will need to be revaccinated because they could have received a diluted dose of Pfizer.

The embarrassing miscarriage unfolded on July 21 at Rockhampton Hospital in Queensland, with up to six people receiving an ultra-low dose of the jab following an ‘administrative error’.

It’s impossible to pinpoint the exact time the error occurred last week, so everyone who was there that day will be called back for another shot.

Authorities assured patients that there is no risk to those who end up getting three shots instead of two.

Each vial of Pfizer vaccine contains enough for six doses mixed once with saline, but in this case one of the vials was diluted twice instead of once.

More than 150 Australians need to be re-vaccinated after possibly receiving an incorrect Pfizer dose at Rockhampton Hospital on July 21 (pictured)

Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young (pictured) was quick to emphasize that the mistake was not a safety risk for those who received the six shots - but admitted the unknown half-dozen people had not been adequately vaccinated

Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young (pictured) was quick to emphasize that the mistake was not a safety risk for those who received the six shots – but admitted the unknown half-dozen people had not been adequately vaccinated

Steve Williamson, chief executive of Central Queensland Hospital and Health Service, apologized for the mistake and 'any distress caused' (picture of a man receiving a Covid vaccine)

Steve Williamson, chief executive of Central Queensland Hospital and Health Service, apologized for the mistake and ‘any distress caused’ (picture of a man receiving a Covid vaccine)

“An initial assessment of the incident has determined that the most plausible cause of the error was a vial of Pfizer vaccine — which makes six injections before being diluted a second time with saline — that was not properly discarded after was prepared,” Queensland Health said in a statement. a statement.

“This was not in line with standard workflow processes.”

Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young was quick to emphasize that the mistake was not a safety concern for those who received the six shots – but admitted that the unknown half-dozen people had not been adequately vaccinated.

“To ensure that all 159 people are fully vaccinated, anyone who has received a vaccination that day (July 21) will be rescheduled for a booster dose,” she said.

“It essentially means that these people will get an early booster shot of Pfizer.”

Steve Williamson, head of the Central Queensland Hospital and Health Service, apologized for the mistake and “it caused distress”, before adding that the focus will be on “working with each individual on what option is best for them”.

“A thorough analysis last weekend didn’t reveal which six (patients) may have received the ultra-low doses, so we’re offering everyone a booster dose,” he says.

“It is also important to note that there is no known clinical risk of receiving a third dose of Pfizer or receiving it between three to six weeks.”

On Wednesday, Queensland registered 20 new cases of Covid-19 and one new case of community transmission.

Of the 20 cases, 19 were from a ship from the Philippines.

Health authorities tested the ship’s 21-person crew, with 19 crew members testing positive.

Panama-flagged MV Sanyu left Manila just over two weeks ago, with the infected now recovering in hospital.

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