Bullets found where Jasmine Hartin ‘shot police officer from Belize’ and convinced prosecutors it was accidental

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Bullets found where Jasmine Hartin ‘shot a Belize police officer with a Glock 17 pistol, convinced prosecutors the murder was accidental’

  • Jasmine Hartin was arrested in Belize after the death of a police chief last week
  • Henry Jemmot died aged 42 after being shot behind his left ear with his own gun
  • She claims it was an accident and the gun went off after trying to hand it to him
  • Bullets at the scene reinforced her claim that she was practicing discharging the gun
  • Traffic police stopped a ‘very drunk’ Jemmott that day, sources say
  • Ms Hartin could plead innocent to negligent homicide

socialite Jasmine Hartin’s full dramatic account of how a Belize police chief was shot dead while enjoying a moonlight drink together is revealed today for the first time in The Mail on Sunday.

Lord Ashcroft’s son’s partner accidentally killed her friend, Chief Inspector Henry Jemmott, with his own gun when he was drunk trying to teach her to use it, The Mail on Sunday has learned.

As Ms Hartin’s story is revealed for the first time, sources close to the investigation told this paper:

  • Bullets found at the scene convinced prosecutors that her claim that she practiced unloading and loading Supt Jemmott’s semi-automatic police-issue Glock 17 pistol was true;
  • Traffic police stopped a ‘very drunk’ Jemmott that day as he was swinging around the island on a golf cart;
  • The Superintendent was on vacation, sharing a hotel room with a man who was once on trial for murder;
  • A court’s decision to deny bail to Ms. Hartin – incarcerated her in Belize’s most notorious prison – is “politically motivated” and intended to appease the “gasp for blood” public.
Jasmine Hartin (pictured in 2013) accidentally killed Chief Inspector Henry Jemmott, with his own gun when he was drunk trying to teach her to use it, The Mail on Sunday has learned

Jasmine Hartin (pictured in 2013) accidentally killed Chief Inspector Henry Jemmott, with his own gun when he was drunk trying to teach her to use it, The Mail on Sunday has learned

Questions are being raised as to why Supt Jemmott gave Ms Hartin his service weapon after he drank heavily.

It has also been suggested that the officer had been given time off due to his mental well-being after relationship issues – leading to claims that his gun should have been seized.

This raises the prospect that Ms Hartin – a Canadian socialite who has twins with Andrew Ashcroft, the son of the former Vice-Chairman of the Conservative Party – will plead not guilty to negligent homicide over the May 28 incident on the island of Ambergris Caye.

Last night a friend said, “She’s been through all the emotions you can imagine. At first she was a total wreck, but as the days went by she got better.’

A visitor who went to see her added: “She’s holding up pretty well. It is clear that as a mother she is mainly concerned about her twins.’

Ms Hartin’s poignant account of the night of the shooting reveals for the first time how Supt Jemmott, a police officer with 20 years of firearms experience, actively encouraged the 6-foot-tall socialite to practice loading and unloading his weapon while she were drinking wine and mini bottles of powerful ‘fireball’ whisky.

Questions are being raised as to why Supt Jemmott (pictured) gave Ms Hartin his service weapon after he drank heavily

Questions are being raised as to why Supt Jemmott (pictured) gave Ms Hartin his service weapon after he drank heavily

A week earlier, the policeman, 42, had told her to buy a gun after being threatened by a man in a bar. We can reveal that it was during a car ride after the incident that Supt Jemmott first gave her his gun and instructed her to practice reloading the bullets.

On the night of the deadly shooting, she said Supt Jemmott handed her his pistol as they sat side by side on the pier, looking out to sea. He then asked her to demonstrate her weapon skills to see if they had improved.

Ms. Hartin said he placed some bullets on the pier after unloading them.

Police confirmed last week that bullets had been found, and a source added: “That was enough for the Director of Public Prosecutions to accept that Jasmine’s statement that she had practiced with the gun was essentially true – how could those bullets came differently? Over there? There was no evidence of intentional intent to kill anyone.”

The MoS has been told the shooting happened after Supt Jemmott spent the day fishing and drinking with friends, including Manuel Pacheco, 59, a Belize City jeweler who was arrested in 2018 and charged with first-degree murder after he killed his neighbor. shot.

Mr Pacheco was kept behind bars for two years until a judge acquitted him in February last year for admitting he acted in self-defense.

A source said police arrested the two men earlier in the day of the shooting as they drove across the island in a golf cart: “Jemmott was very drunk. The golf cart was swinging in all directions, so a traffic cop stopped it. He definitely had booze in his system. He was as drunk as f***.’

On the night of the deadly shooting, she said Supt Jemmott handed her his gun as they sat on the pier (pictured) looking out to sea.  He asked her to demonstrate her weapon skills

On the night of the deadly shooting, she said Supt Jemmott handed her his gun as they sat on the pier (pictured) looking out to sea. He asked her to demonstrate her weapon skills

Police Commissioner Chester Williams confirmed last week that Supt Jemmott had been given time off for “personal reasons”.

Multiple sources have said he was having relationship issues with his fiancée Romit Wilson, the mother of his three youngest children, and had asked for a five-day break for his mental wellbeing.

The MoS source says Ms Hartin’s lawyers will likely wonder why a police chief with “personal problems” was allowed to keep his service weapon.

A source said: ‘It is difficult to see how Jasmine can be charged with negligence. She was with a trusted senior police officer who was a friend.

He had been drinking and was willing to hand over his weapon to a woman to practice loading and unloading the weapon.

“If he was given time off for emotional and personal reasons, why didn’t the police ask him to hand over his gun?

“All of this raises questions about where the negligence lay.”

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