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Builders, Engineers, and Architects at the Top of the JobKeeper List – How Industries Are Affected by COVID-19

Builders, engineers and architects are at the top of the JobKeeper list – so how severely is YOUR industry affected by the coronavirus pandemic?

  • Data shows construction, professional service industries at the top of JobKeeper receivers
  • Art and catering account for 10 percent of the companies that fall under the scheme
  • Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers calls on the government to clarify Jobkeeper’s future
  • JobKeeper criticized for allowing many loose workers to fall through the gaps
  • Employment Minister Michaelia Cash launches new campaign for small businesses

Construction and professional service sectors, such as engineers and architects, are JobKeeper’s biggest receivers, according to the latest data from Treasury.

The two industries make up three in ten companies covered by the wage subsidy and employ about a quarter of the workers.

The Treasury data shows that 140,138 construction companies with 348,077 employees were eligible for JobKeeper in early June.

There were 130,052 professional, technical and scientific service companies, with 396,424 employees – the largest number of any sector – receiving the wage subsidy.

Construction and professional services sectors, such as engineers and architects, are JobKeeper’s largest recipients and make up three in ten companies covered by the wage subsidy

There were 130,052 professional, technical and scientific service companies, with 396,424 employees - the largest number of all sectors - receiving the wage subsidy

There were 130,052 professional, technical and scientific service companies, with 396,424 employees - the largest number of all sectors - receiving the wage subsidy

There were 130,052 professional, technical and scientific service companies, with 396,424 employees – the largest number of all sectors – receiving the wage subsidy

Both sectors have lost about one in twenty jobs since March.

With Thursday’s approval numbers showing a record drop in home financing in May, there are fears that housing construction will fall off a cliff once JobKeeper ends, and more jobs will be lost.

The arts and hospitality sectors, hardest hit by coronavirus shutdowns, accounted for just over 10 percent of all companies covered by the scheme.

About one in eight workers who receive wage subsidies work in these areas.

Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show that the catering industry has lost about three out of ten jobs since the crisis in March and the art sector nearly a quarter.

Labor and others have criticized the JobKeeper plan, leaving many informal workers in these industries through the gaps.

Shadow treasurer Jim Chalmers said the numbers, coupled with the return to severe restrictions in Melbourne amid community outbreaks of the corona virus, made it vital for the government to clarify JobKeeper’s future after its planned end in September.

“The Morrison government could better focus on and wind down, but shouldn’t just turn the tap on when companies struggle with new restrictions,” said Dr. Chalmers.

Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers (pictured) has called on the government to clarify JobKeeper's future after its planned end in September

Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers (pictured) has called on the government to clarify JobKeeper's future after its planned end in September

Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers (pictured) has called on the government to clarify JobKeeper’s future after its planned end in September

“Australians have introduced aid too tight and too slow for the economy and need to know that the government has a more comprehensive plan to support long-term growth and job creation.”

Victorian Prime Minister Dan Andrews said he understood from his talks with the federal government that further assistance would be announced later this month.

“The Prime Minister and the treasurer … confirmed that” hardship “will continue to drive the Commonwealth government’s response,” he said Thursday.

Employment Minister Michaelia Cash will launch a new small business campaign on Friday encouraging Australians to shop locally.

Victorian Prime Minister Dan Andrews (pictured) said he understood from his talks with the federal government that further aid would be announced later this month

Victorian Prime Minister Dan Andrews (pictured) said he understood from his talks with the federal government that further aid would be announced later this month

Victorian Prime Minister Dan Andrews (pictured) said he understood from his talks with the federal government that further aid would be announced later this month

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