Buffalo is taken down by a trio of hungry lions in a deadly ambush [Video]

0

Cornered! Momentarily, a lone buffalo is taken down by three hungry lions in a deadly ambush

  • Trail ranger Jan Kriel captured the images in Kruger National Park, South Africa
  • The 50-year-old was only meters away from the three male lions
  • Trio spent 90 seconds cornering and stalking their prey before going in to kill

A trio of hungry lions proved themselves a force to be reckoned with when they launched a deadly ambush on a lone buffalo.

Trail ranger Jan Kriel, from Mpumalanga, South Africa, captured the nail-biting images in the country’s Kruger National Park.

The 50-year-old was just yards away when the three male lions spent 90 seconds chasing their prey before going in to commit the murder.

Trail ranger Jan Kriel, from Mpumalanga, South Africa, captured the nail-biting footage in the country's Kruger National Park

Trail ranger Jan Kriel, from Mpumalanga, South Africa, captured the nail-biting footage in the country’s Kruger National Park

In the clip, one of the male lions carefully makes its way down a hill to his unsuspecting prey.

The buffalo suddenly sees the predator lurking and scrambles to its feet before forcing the lion onto a nearby rock.

But two more lions join the hunt and circle the buffalo before the deadly trio leap and kill them.

Trail ranger Jan has since said: ‘The lions looked incredibly hungry, so I knew we would be in for a surprise.

‘We were actually looking at the buffalo when we suddenly saw the three male lions nearby.

The three male lions spent 90 seconds cornering and stalking their prey before going in to kill

The three male lions spent 90 seconds cornering and stalking their prey before going in to kill

The three male lions spent 90 seconds cornering and stalking their prey before going in to kill

Lions usually ambush their prey by fanning out in a semicircle to drive the prey to the center where it is easier for them to kill their last prey

Lions usually ambush their prey by fanning out in a semicircle to drive the prey to the center where it is easier for them to kill their last prey

Lions usually ambush their prey by fanning out in a semicircle to drive the prey to the center where it is easier for them to kill their last prey

Knowing they were quite hungry, we gave them some space and watched the hunt unfold.

Once the lions launched onto the buffalo, we realized that the buffalo had a broken foreleg, which explains why it was easy prey on its own.

“I knew what we saw before us was the circle of life and a good example of the strongest survivors. If an animal gets hurt, Mother Nature will throw it away. This time the lions did that work. ‘

Lions usually ambush their prey by fanning out in a semicircle to drive the prey to the center where it is easier for them to kill their last prey.

Lionesses hunt for about 90 percent of a pride’s food, but males don’t pass up an excellent hunting opportunity.

Advertisement