Brown bear shows off his father dancing moves up against a tree during a display of territory marker

A young brown bear shows off his father who is dancing against a tree during a display of territory marking

  • The grizzly bear rubbed the bark to mark its territory
  • Nature photographer Russell Millner caught the animal in action in Canada
  • The bear flaunted his movements on his hind legs with his legs in the air
Advertisements

A grizzly bear has been captured and shows a show for the camera while he is dancing next to a tree in Canada.

The young bear showed his movements by standing on his hind legs and stepping side by side with his legs in the air.

Professional nature photographer Russell Millner caught the animal in action alongside the Nakina River in the T&A camp in northern British Columbia, Canada.

He said the brown bear, about six feet tall, rubbed the tree to mark its territory, but & # 39; clearly enjoyed the sensation & # 39 ;.

Advertisements

Millner, from Bowness-on-Windermere in Cumbria, traveled for three days to take close-up photos of the bears.

He said: & # 39; It is a real privilege to spend time in the bear's backyard.

The young bear showed his movements by standing on his hind legs and stepping side by side with his legs in the air

The young bear showed his movements by standing on his hind legs and stepping side by side with his legs in the air

The photographer who captured the moment said the brown bear, about six feet tall, rubbed the tree to mark its territory, but & # 39; clearly enjoyed the sensation & # 39;

The photographer who captured the moment said the brown bear, about six feet tall, rubbed the tree to mark its territory, but & # 39; clearly enjoyed the sensation & # 39;

The photographer who captured the moment said the brown bear, about six feet tall, rubbed the tree to mark its territory, but & # 39; clearly enjoyed the sensation & # 39;

& # 39; In this specific camp you get very close, in a controlled and reasonably safe way, to these bears.

Advertisements

& # 39; There is a lot of emphasis on keeping the interactions safe so as not to endanger the bears. & # 39;

Millner added: & # 39; This bear rubbed his back against the tree and hugged him for about two minutes.

Millner said the young male bear, who weighed about 120 kg and was about five meters away, was not bothered by his presence

Millner said the young male bear, who weighed about 120 kg and was about five meters away, was not bothered by his presence

Millner said the young male bear, who weighed about 120 kg and was about five meters away, was not bothered by his presence

& # 39; He clearly enjoyed the sensation. His movements were much better than father's dancing.

Advertisements

& # 39; It is not clear why they do it, but a behavioral ecologist, Dr. Owen Nevin suggested that they use it as a way to communicate with other male bears to reduce conflict with them.

& # 39; It seems to be about odor marking. & # 39;

Millner said the young male bear, who weighed about 120 kg and was about five meters away, was not bothered by his presence.

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail

Advertisements

- Advertisement -