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Broke heiress is blocked from accessing her $12MILLION fortune

An Australian heiress will inherit a whopping $12 million if she can complete a simple task: get a job.

But Clare Brown says her father’s latest request is unrealistic.

The bankrupt former private schoolgirl is now challenging her father’s will in court after her trust blocked her access to the funds for failing to meet the requirements.

“Give me what is rightfully mine. I suffer,’ she begged her family further A current matter on Tuesday.

“Can you please stop the whole ‘I’m getting a job’ thing.” It’s not happening.

“I’m constantly broke and can’t help it.”

Clare Brown is challenging her father's will, saying she can't access her $12 million inheritance

Clare Brown is challenging her father’s will, saying she can’t access her $12 million inheritance

Clare lives on hand-to-mouth benefits with her wife Lauren and their one-year-old daughter in Mount Druitt in Sydney’s western suburbs.

Her life is far removed from her upbringing in the east of the city with her successful stockbroker father Chris, who sent her to one of Sydney’s most prestigious schools.

For the past few years, she received a $500-a-week stipend from him while receiving government benefits – but says she was forced to call Centrelink because her father “continued to cut her off” and she was “financially abused.”

When Chris died in January, Clare was left with the millions he’d made in the stock market, as long as she fulfilled two clauses: get a job and contribute to society.

But the mother of one says she can’t work because she has ADHD.

“I understand why these people want me to be a functioning member of society, but you have to look at my diagnosis and realize that’s not going to happen,” she said.

She was left with millions of dollars when her stockbroker, father Chris (pictured together) died in January

She was left with millions of dollars when her stockbroker, father Chris (pictured together) died in January

‘I’m not going to learn to drive because I have ADHD. I have the attention span of a mosquito.’

Lauren said Clare — who has also been diagnosed with high-functioning autism — has trouble doing everyday tasks and getting things done. The family needs a daily checklist, with reminders for Mrs. Brown to eat.

“She doesn’t have an executive function in mind,” Lauren said.

“Our cats wouldn’t be fed, they’d starve — because she wouldn’t remember to eat.”

But Clare’s family claims the circumstances are an excuse.

Clare lives check to check with her partner Lauren (pictured) in Sydney's west

Clare lives check to check with her partner Lauren (pictured) in Sydney’s west

Lauren said Clare needs a daily checklist to function or she would forget the daily tasks

Lauren said Clare needs a daily checklist to function or she would forget the daily tasks

‘We want her to get a job and contribute to society. Instead of agreeing to her late father’s wishes, she turned and denounced her trust.’

Clare and Lauren lived in her father’s mansion in the Eastern Suburbs before moving to Mount Druitt with her family.

Jimmy’s twin brother then moved into the property for four years rent-free under an agreement he made with Chris in exchange for carrying out renovations.

‘We’re at our wits’ end.

“We’ve done nothing but love Clare.”

Her cousin Jimmy (pictured) said it was 'embarrassing' because Clare could get to work and access her confidence

Her cousin Jimmy (pictured) said it was ’embarrassing’ because Clare could get to work and access her confidence

Clare’s only mention on her resume is previously part-time work for Autism Australia. She also had a short stint as a barista – lasting less than an hour.

When asked if she wants to work, Clare replied “yes and no,” citing the implications of her circumstances.

Clare, who has a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) carer, said recent cuts in the sector have made efforts to find work more difficult, as employers are less willing to “give people a chance.”

However, she said that if her NDIS funding increases, she may one day get a job.

“I just want what’s rightfully mine. And I want these people to get out of their minds that I’ll ever get a job,” she said.

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