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Britons caught by the wild fires of Australia reveal the terrifying scenes around them

British expats in Australia share their experiences of getting caught in devastating forest fires on New Year’s Eve.

Dr. Billy Tusker Haworth from Manchester told how he was caught on fire in Bega, a town in southeastern New South Wales, and spends his New Year’s Eve listening to the news for updates.

Bega Valley on the southeastern coastline of the NSW has been torn apart by bushfire and has claimed the lives of father and son Robert Salway (63) and Patrick Salway (29) in Cobargo. Their bodies were found Tuesday morning.

It is among the latest in a series of heat waves and high winds that have caused new destruction in a country that has been fighting unprecedented forest fires for months.

An image shared by Dr. Haworth of a smoke-filled Bega house

A bega house covered in smoke

A bega house covered in smoke

Dr. Haworth, a geographer who works as a teacher in geographic information systems (GIS), has shared ghostly photos of his house that are encased in smoke

One photo shows Haworth with a face mask, next to the words: “Don’t forget to keep your animals safe!”

Dr. Billy Tusker Haworth (photo) is originally from Manchester and completes PhD research on natural disaster management at the University of Sydney

Dr. Billy Tusker Haworth (photo) is originally from Manchester and completes PhD research on natural disaster management at the University of Sydney

Dr. Billy Tusker Haworth (photo) is originally from Manchester and completes PhD research on natural disaster management at the University of Sydney

Dr. Haworth is currently completing PhD research on natural disaster management at the University of Sydney and specializes in participatory mapping in reducing bushfire risks by communities.

He described the feeling as if he were in the middle of the fire in ‘limbo land’.

“It really makes me very sad,” he said.

“Now that I’m in a bushfire area near Bega, I just feel like I’m in a limbo country.

“The word” crisis “really feels appropriate and I feel so lost because I know that the people with the power to do something in this country are so absent (in many ways).”

Dr. Haworth, a geographer who works as a teacher in geographic information systems (GIS), has shared ghostly photos of his house that are encased in smoke.

One photo shows Haworth with a face mask, next to the words: “Don’t forget to keep your animals safe!”

He described his plans for New Year’s Eve as sitting “on the couch listening to radio updates.”

Apocalyptic scenes show his house wrapped in an orange-red haze under a blood-red sky.

Dr. Haworth's house is covered in orange haze

Dr. Haworth's house is covered in orange haze

He described his plans for New Year's Eve as sitting 'listening to radio updates on the couch'

He described his plans for New Year's Eve as sitting 'listening to radio updates on the couch'

Dr. Haworth described his plans for New Year’s Eve as sitting ‘on the couch listening to radio updates’

Another British expat from Scotland, living in Shoalhaven, in the southeastern coast of New South Wales, shared ominous photos of huge plumes of smoke hanging over houses.

He tweeted: “A few progress photos taken from home, of local fires for us today.

“Southern change brought the worst, along with a small ember attack. Fortunately it was not as bad as last Saturday.

“There are other fires nearby in the city. Houses have been lost. ”

The unprecedented forest fires in Australia have been burning for months, but the latest in a series of heat waves and strong winds have caused a new devastation.

Smoke from nearby fires has enveloped the sun in some areas and limited visibility to just a few meters, even in the middle of the day.

Another British expat from Scotland, living in Shoalhaven, in the southeastern coast of New South Wales, shared ominous photos of huge plumes of smoke hanging over houses

Another British expat from Scotland, living in Shoalhaven, in the southeastern coast of New South Wales, shared ominous photos of huge plumes of smoke hanging over houses

Another British expat from Scotland, living in Shoalhaven, in the southeastern coast of New South Wales, shared ominous photos of huge plumes of smoke hanging over houses

He tweeted: “A few progress photos taken from home, from local fires for us today”

A plume of ominous smoke hangs over houses in Shoalhaven, in the southeastern coastal area of ​​New South Wales

A plume of ominous smoke hangs over houses in Shoalhaven, in the southeastern coastal area of ​​New South Wales

A plume of ominous smoke hangs over houses in Shoalhaven, in the southeastern coastal area of ​​New South Wales

Houses shrouded in a dark haze in Shoalhaven on photos taken by a Scot who lived nearby on New Year's Eve

Houses shrouded in a dark haze in Shoalhaven on photos taken by a Scot who lived nearby on New Year's Eve

Houses shrouded in a dark haze in Shoalhaven on photos taken by a Scot who lived nearby on New Year’s Eve

From Tuesday evening, more than 100 fires burned in NSW with 60 uninhibited and eight at the alarm level.

In Victoria, there were four unjustified people in the Eastern Gippsland region east of Melbourne, but there was good news in the afternoon when the Country Fire Authority said a wind change broke and pushed the fire front away from the threatened city of Mallacoota.

Authorities believe that more than 4,000 people are still trapped in Mallacoota, in the East Gippsland region of Victoria, which was hit by a fire at around 8:30 am on Tuesday. Four people are missing in flames that have destroyed at least 43 homes.

In some places, the flames were so intense, the smoke so thick and dry lightning storms caused by fire, so intense that air reconnaissance and water bombing had to be stopped, the New South Wales Rural Fire Service said.

Temperatures in bushfire areas can hit hundreds of degrees Celsius (Fahrenheit), killing everyone in the neighborhood long before the flames reach them.

Flight to the ocean is a “last resort” according to Victoria’s emergency management office.

The crisis has drawn attention to climate change – which scientists say is creating a longer and more intense bushfire season – and led to street protests calling for immediate action to tackle global warming.

Are you a Brit hit by the forest fires in Australia? Email sophie.tanno@mailonline.co.uk

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