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British pilot feared to become the first coronavirus death in Vietnam is FREE from the disease

British pilot, feared to become the first coronavirus death in Vietnam, is FREE of the disease after a two-month hospital battle

  • The unnamed Vietnam Airlines pilot, 43, was hospitalized on March 18
  • Local media report that the pilot has tested negative five times in the past 20 days
  • The pilot remains in life support after critical transfer
  • Here’s how you can help people affected by Covid-19

A British pilot feared to become the first coronavirus death in Vietnam has now been confirmed as free from the virus after two months in intensive care.

The unnamed pilot, 43, who worked for Vietnam Airlines, was admitted to the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City in southern Vietnam on March 18 and became the country’s most critical patient, with his lung function declining to just 10 percent.

The director of the Vietnamese Ministry of Health’s medical examination and treatment administration, Luong Ngoc Khue, has said that the hospital has “fulfilled its mission to treat the British man” named “Patient 91”.

Local media reports that the pilot has tested negative five times in the past 20 days, with Khue saying it can be confirmed ‘that he is free from the new corona virus.’

The unnamed pilot, 43, who worked for Vietnam Airlines, was admitted to the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City in southern Vietnam on March 18.

The unnamed pilot, 43, who worked for Vietnam Airlines, was admitted to the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City in southern Vietnam on March 18.

The British man remains in critical support for life support after being transferred to Cho Ray Hospital. But local media reports that he has shown signs of improvement, with his lung function rising to between 20 and 30 percent.

He reportedly suffers from a blood clotting disorder and cytokine storm syndrome.

The syndrome causes patients’ immune systems to release a large number of cytokines – a group of small proteins that work against the body – into the bloodstream.

Hospital director for tropical diseases, Nguyen Vinh Chau, said a lung transplant is still being considered for the patient, despite the revival of his condition.

The director of the Department of Medical Examination and Treatment at the Vietnamese Ministry of Health, Luong Ngoc Khue (pictured), said the hospital has `` fulfilled its mission to treat the British man '' named `` Patient 91. ''

The director of the Department of Medical Examination and Treatment at the Vietnamese Ministry of Health, Luong Ngoc Khue (pictured), said the hospital has `` fulfilled its mission to treat the British man '' named `` Patient 91. ''

The director of the Department of Medical Examination and Treatment at the Vietnamese Ministry of Health, Luong Ngoc Khue (pictured), said the hospital has “ fulfilled its mission to treat the British man ” named “ Patient 91. ”

However, doctors must wait for an infection in his pleura, the thin covering that protects the lungs, before performing a transplant.

The man turned out to be the source of the largest COVID-19 hotspot in Vietnam, the Buddha Bar & Grill in Ho Chi Minh City’s Thao Dien neighborhood, where 19 people were infected.

Local media report that 60 people have signed up to donate part of their lungs to help the British man, but doctors said they would prioritize donations from brain-dead donors.

Hospital director for tropical diseases, Nguyen Vinh Chau, said a lung transplant is still being considered for the patient, despite the resurgence of his condition

Hospital director for tropical diseases, Nguyen Vinh Chau, said a lung transplant is still being considered for the patient, despite the resurgence of his condition

Hospital director for tropical diseases, Nguyen Vinh Chau, said a lung transplant is still being considered for the patient, despite the resurgence of his condition

According to reports, the situation is complicated because the man had told doctors he had no living relatives, and in Vietnam, all operations must be approved by the patient or the patient’s authorized representative.

The country is said to have spent approximately 5 billion VND (175,908 GBP) on the treatment of the man.

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