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British MPs are THREE times more likely to ‘drink in a risky’ way than members of the public

British MPs are three times more likely to “risky drink” and put a whole bottle of wine on a standard day than members of the public, a study suggests.

Those MPs who do extra work outside the Commons are rather the worst culprits and end up with the heaviest boozers in the country.

MPs are also more likely to enjoy alcohol at least four times a week, drink a minimum of ten units a day – equivalent to five pints, ten shots or a bottle of wine – and binge drink six or more units in one session.

Experts have also found that MPs are more likely to feel guilty about their alcohol consumption.

Since the study was conducted in 2016, there has been a crackdown on the “culture of redundancy” in parliament, which has been linked to bullying and bullying.

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British MPs are three times more likely to 'risky to drink' and drink a whole bottle of wine on a standard day than members of the public, a study suggests

British MPs are three times more likely to ‘risky to drink’ and drink a whole bottle of wine on a standard day than members of the public, a study suggests

Psychiatrist and paper author Tony Rao of King’s College London said the aim of the study was to drink “risky – dangerous, harmful and dependent – among MPs.”

“The overall risk of risky drinking was higher than among the English population, but did not differ significantly from groups that were comparable in both socio-economic and professional status.”

However, MPs were more likely to participate in ‘drinking at least four times a week, drinking at least 10 units on a typical drinking day, drinking six units or more in a single episode and feeling guilty about their drinking’.

Risky drinking behavior can escalate to more serious alcohol-related harm, Dr. explained. Rao.

All 650 members of parliament in December 2016 were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey – with 146 responses, of whom more than one third (37%) were women and about half were over 50.

The low participation rate may have been prompted by stigma or fear of being identified, the researchers said.

This – in addition to the fact that there is a larger percentage of women in the sample of MPs than is found in parliament – may have led to an underestimation of both the amount and frequency of high-risk drinking.

“It may also have underestimated the likelihood of even greater differences in high-risk drinking for MPs with extra work outside parliament – and people with likely mental health problems.”

Those MPs who do extra work outside the Commons are rather the worst offenders and end up with the heaviest boozers in the country

Those MPs who do extra work outside the Commons are rather the worst offenders and end up with the heaviest boozers in the country

Those MPs who do extra work outside the Commons are rather the worst offenders and end up with the heaviest boozers in the country

“Further research into the availability of alcohol is justified because we understand that there are 30 bars, restaurants, and catering suites where alcohol is available or is being sold at the Palace of Westminster,” Dr. said. Rao.

In addition to this, he added, there are “six bars open most evenings when MPs vote or wait to vote.”

He said it would be reasonable to assume that most alcohol is consumed on the parliamentary estate, given MPs late working hours.

“Although beer and wine are provided free of charge to members of the Belgian parliament, we are not aware of the availability of alcohol in other parliaments – but this is generally not a feature of the modern workplace,” Dr. added. Rao ready.

MPs are also more likely to enjoy alcohol at least four times a week, drink at least ten units per day - equivalent to five pints, ten shots or a bottle of wine - and binge drink six or more units in one session

MPs are also more likely to enjoy alcohol at least four times a week, drink at least ten units per day - equivalent to five pints, ten shots or a bottle of wine - and binge drink six or more units in one session

MPs are also more likely to enjoy alcohol at least four times a week, drink at least ten units a day – equivalent to five pints, ten shots or a bottle of wine – and binge drink six or more units in one session

The researchers pointed out that politicians are subjected to increased control that can involve intrusive and aggressive behavior of the public.

This can be attacks or attempted attacks, threats and material damage. It is known that more than half of the MPs suffer from stalking or intimidation.

“This has consequences for both mental health problems and the potentially risky use of alcohol,” said Dr. Rao.

“Stalking is known to be associated with a higher risk of mental disorders such as depression, panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.”

“Work-related stress is known to be associated with long working hours and time pressure, lack of emotional support, family and constituency problems, and insecurity at work.”

“It is also associated with risky drinking, especially in work environments where alcohol is easily accessible.”

The participants were asked to complete the so-called Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, which assesses how much and how often a person drinks.

It also identifies what happens afterwards – such as feelings of guilt or regret, injury or blackouts.

Answers were each scored from zero to four and added to give a maximum score of 40. A score above eight indicates risky drinking.

The answers were compared with those of the nationally representative Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2014, which provides data on the prevalence of treated and untreated mental health problems in English adults.

The GHQ-12, a validated health questionnaire, was used to assess the mental health of the respondents.

They were categorized as no evidence of likely mental health problems, less than optimal mental health, or likely mental disorders or mental health problems.

Those with a ‘probable’ mental illness were nearly 2.5 times as likely to be risky drinkers.

About a fifth of the respondents also worked outside parliament.

Nearly a quarter were unaware of the parliamentary health and welfare service.

Experts have also found that MPs are more likely to feel guilty about their alcohol consumption. Since the study was conducted in 2016, there has been a crackdown on the “culture of redundancy” in parliament, which has been related to bullying and bullying

“Given the considerable stigma associated with psychological problems, it is necessary that MPs be better informed about their own welfare services, in order to reduce stigma and improve the search for help in Parliament,” Dr. added.

The health and social costs of alcohol in the UK are around £ 21 billion ($ 26.9 billion) per year.

One fifth of everyone admitted to the UK drinks at harmful levels, while one in ten members of the population is dependent on alcohol.

Nearly three in ten men and one in seven women drink at potentially harmful levels, the researchers said.

The researchers noted that since the investigation was conducted, two general elections have been held in which the people in the lower house have changed.

Last year, MPs were warned not to keep drunken lock-ins in their offices after the bars were closed, alcohol advertisements were banned in the village of Westminster, and canteens were ordered not to serve wine.

These initiatives, including the introduction of ‘non-alcoholic zones’, were introduced to encourage ‘responsible consumption’.

Drinks on the parliamentary estate are considerably cheaper than drinks in pubs and bars in the rest of Westminster, partly because they are compared to inns in less expensive parts of the country.

A pint of Carlsberg in Strangers’ Bar costs £ 3.35, a glass of Merlot is £ 2.75 and a bottle of champagne is £ 35 – while a glass of red wine in the nearby Red Lion pub costs at least £ 5.

Former MEP Eric Joyce was convicted of assaulting a fellow politician during a fight at Strangers’ Bar in 2012, and another former member, Mark Reckless, admitted that he had missed a late parliamentary vote in 2010 for being drunk .

In October, before becoming President of the House of Commons, Sir Lindsay Hoyle said there was a drinking problem that “needs to be addressed.”

The full findings of the study were published in the journal BMJ Open.

WHAT IS ALCOHOLISM AND HOW IS IT TREATED IN THE UK?

Alcoholism is the most serious form of alcohol abuse and includes the inability to control drinking habits.

It is organized into three categories: mild, moderate and serious. Each category has different symptoms and can cause harmful side effects.

If it remains untreated, any type of alcohol abuse can get out of hand.

People who struggle with alcoholism often feel that they cannot function normally without alcohol.

This can lead to a wide range of problems and affect professional goals, personal issues, relationships and overall health.

Sometimes the warning signs of alcohol abuse are very noticeable. At other times it may take longer to surface.

When alcohol addiction is detected at an early stage, the chance of a successful recovery increases considerably.

Common signs of alcoholism include:

  • Not being able to control alcohol consumption
  • Desire for alcohol if you don’t drink
  • Put alcohol above personal responsibilities
  • Feeling the need to keep drinking more
  • Spend a lot of money on alcohol
  • Behave differently after drinking

Short-term effects of alcohol abuse can be just as dangerous as long-term effects.

For example, drinking can influence your reaction time, causing you to have slow reflexes and coordination.

That is why driving under the influence is extremely dangerous. Going behind the wheel of a car can change your perception of speed and distance, putting you and others at risk.

Various short-term effects of alcohol abuse can lead to:

  • Slow response time
  • Bad reflexes
  • Reduce brain activity
  • Reduced inhibitions
  • Blurry sight
  • Breathing problems
  • Restlessness

In addition, consuming too much alcohol can affect your health in the long term. Some side effects can last for years before they come to the surface.

Professional medical care is therefore required for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Long-term health problems caused by alcohol:

  • Brain disorders
  • Liver disease
  • Diabetes complications
  • Heart problems
  • Increased risk of cancer
  • Vision damage
  • Bone loss

Treatment for alcoholism

There are various forms of treatment available based on the frequency and severity of alcohol abuse.

Recovering from alcohol addiction is a process that continues long after rehabilitation.

It requires dedication to practice and apply the techniques you learn in rehabilitation, counseling, support groups and other types of therapy.

Although each individual will have his own recovery plan tailored to his specific needs, treatment usually follows a structure.

The alcohol treatment consists of three parts, consisting of:

detoxify

The first phase in the recovery of alcohol addiction is detoxification. This phase must be completed with the help of medical professionals because of the potential for serious, uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. People often receive medication to help alleviate the painful side effects of a withdrawal.

Revalidation

There are two types of rehabilitation that help treat alcoholism: inpatient rehabilitation and outpatient rehabilitation. Inpatient rehabilitation programs are intensive treatment programs where you have to report to a facility for a certain period, usually 30, 60 or 90 days. Outpatient rehabilitation allows individuals to participate in a recovery program while continuing their daily life. Talk to your doctor about treatment options to determine which type of recovery suits you best.

Maintenance

The recovery process does not end with the completion of the rehabilitation. Long-term austerity requires ongoing therapy and may include support groups, counseling, and other remedies. These ensure that you stay sober and that you stay on a happy, healthy path for months and years.

Source: Alcohol Rehab Guide

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