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British grandmother Mollie Manley (photo) died peacefully in a nurse a week after delay

British grandma, 93, who had 28 days to leave Australia or take the risk because she had a & # 39; health care burden & # 39; dies in a nursing home

  • Grandmother who was in danger of being deported died peacefully in care home
  • Mollie Manley, 93, would be deported back to Britain without family
  • She was delayed after her story was widely distributed by the news media
  • According to media reports, Mrs. Manley died earlier this week
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A British great-grandmother who was instructed to go to Australia or take a risk because she was a health care tax died.

Mollie Manley, 93, moved to Australia from Britain 11 years ago to be closer to her family, including her nine great-grandchildren.

But she had previously rejected her visa application for health reasons and given 28 days in advance to go back to Britain, where she has no living relatives or friends.

Mrs. Manley, blind and bedridden, lived in a care home in Perth and confusedly warned her family that she would die on the plane if she had to leave.

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After widespread public outrage, Mrs. Manley's son-in-law, Rob Rowe, received a call from the Ministry of the Interior last week assuring her that she would not be deported.

The last minute delay meant Mrs. Manley could die in Australia, surrounded by her loving family.

British grandmother Mollie Manley (photo) died peacefully in a nurse a week after delay

British grandmother Mollie Manley (photo) died peacefully in a nurse a week after delay

The age reported that she had died earlier this week.

Mrs. Manley first entered the country with a temporary bridging visa, while her application for a parent-parent visa was processed.

However, she was unable to obtain a permanent residence visa after she had become blind and moved to a care center.

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She was looked after by her family before being placed in the retirement home two years ago.

Mrs. Manley had a stroke earlier in the year and the family surrounded her bed with the worst, she pulled through it and was able to hold on for a few more months.

There are no reports yet about the cause of death of Mrs. Manley or an official statement from her family.

Mrs. Manley, 93 (far left) moved to Australia from Britain 11 years ago to be closer to her family, including her great-grandchildren

Mrs. Manley, 93 (far left) moved to Australia from Britain 11 years ago to be closer to her family, including her great-grandchildren

Mrs. Manley, 93 (far left) moved to Australia from Britain 11 years ago to be closer to her family, including her great-grandchildren

Mrs Manley had entered the country for the first time with a temporary bridge visa, while her application for a parent-parent visa was processed
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Mrs Manley had entered the country for the first time with a temporary bridge visa, while her application for a parent-parent visa was processed

Mrs Manley had entered the country for the first time with a temporary bridge visa, while her application for a parent-parent visa was processed

Before canceling the visa, Mr Rowe described the department's actions as similar to a & # 39; right-wing dictatorship & # 39 ;.

Ms. Manley was informed on May 12 that her application for a parent parent visa had been rejected because she did not meet the criteria due to her poor health.

According to the health criteria, an applicant must be disease-free and free from any condition that would cost the health sector more than $ 40,000 (£ 22,000) in total.

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Mrs. Manley's complete care would cost around $ 145,000 (£ 80,000) in the next three years.

The Department of Home Affairs emphasized that they had not toiled around the case under pressure from the media.

But Mr. Rowe said he said these & # 39; with a pinch of salt & # 39; took.

After the family situation reports were widely distributed, Mrs. Manley's son-in-law, Rob Rowe, received a call from the Department of the Interior assuring that she would not be deported

After the family situation reports were widely distributed, Mrs. Manley's son-in-law, Rob Rowe, received a call from the Department of the Interior assuring that she would not be deported

After the family situation reports were widely distributed, Mrs. Manley's son-in-law, Rob Rowe, received a call from the Department of the Interior assuring that she would not be deported

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