British Cycling threatens legal action as Dutch brand accuses GB of COPYING design for new bike

British Cycling threatens legal action as Dutch brand accuses GB of COPYING their patented design for a radical new bike that Jason Kenny and Co will use at the Tokyo velodrome

British Cycling has been threatened with legal action by a Dutch brand that claims Team GB’s radical new Olympic bike is based on their idea.

The Lotus x Hope HB.T ​​used by Great Britain at Tokyo 2020 has particularly wide front forks to divert air around a rider’s legs.

However, Dutch bicycle manufacturer Ku Cycle insists that their own English engineer Richard McAinsh filed for a patent on a similar design in 2016 and says British Cycling rejected their own patent this year.

British Cycling has brought a brand new bike design to the Tokyo Olympics for their athletes

British Cycling has brought a brand new bike design to the Tokyo Olympics for their athletes

Designed by Hope, British Cycling can now take legal action from a Dutch brand

Designed by Hope, British Cycling can now take legal action from a Dutch brand

Designed by Hope, British Cycling can now take legal action from a Dutch brand

“We have to put our commitment in the ground and say we believe this is our technology,” said Ku Cycle co-founder Alex Bok. Sports post.

“If our patent attorneys prove the infringement is deep enough, we’ll say, ‘Here’s a letter guys, how do we deal with this? If you want to engage in a drastic battle, our lawyers are 100 percent ready to defend our patent.”

“Sometimes you have to say, ‘Don’t ignore history, don’t ignore where the idea comes from’.

“We don’t seek media attention, we just say, ‘Give us the credit for what we believe is ours. If you don’t want to, fine, but you’re forcing our hands into action.”

The team pursuit is underway in Tokyo, while Laura Kenny and Co are already racing the bikes

The team pursuit is underway in Tokyo, while Laura Kenny and Co are already racing the bikes

The team pursuit is underway in Tokyo, while Laura Kenny and Co are already racing the bikes

“If you feel other people are trying to brag and sell it as their great idea, it gets a bit tedious and that’s why we put our stake in the ground.

“We’re super interested in what they have to say and that will set the spirit of how this evolves.”

The Team GB bike for Tokyo was first launched in October 2019, but was not used publicly until Monday by all British riders at the Izu Velodrome. Sources close to British Cycling have dismissed Ku Cycle’s complaints as a publicity stunt.

But Bok adds: ‘Richard developed an idea for a completely new front of the bicycle and he filed that patent in 2016. In 2020 it was approved in Europe.

“We did our homework in 2021 and there was one undisclosed patent application filed by British Cycling in 2019. In March of this year, their patent was not approved because it came too close to a patent that had already been filed and approved. .

Ethan Hayter, Ethan Vernon, Oliver Wood and Ed Clancy are the men hoping for team pursuit in Britain

Ethan Hayter, Ethan Vernon, Oliver Wood and Ed Clancy are the men hoping for team pursuit in Britain

Ethan Hayter, Ethan Vernon, Oliver Wood and Ed Clancy are the men hoping for team pursuit in Britain

“If one is filing in 2016 and getting everything approved and the other is filing under a secret warrant in 2019, which rings a bell and gets rejected in March of this year, then I think British Cycling has something to think about.” to think .’

A British Cycling spokesperson told Sportsmail: ‘The design for this bike has been in the public eye for almost two years. We are convinced that it does not infringe any patents and we are happy to deal with any challenges through the right processes.”

Meanwhile, Team GB and Australia have raised their question about the use of medical tape on their riders’ shins by rivals in Denmark during the men’s team pursuit, something Chris Boardman noted on Twitter.

Cycling’s governing body, UCI, has a strict rule on the maximum height of socks to prevent teams from gaining an aerodynamic advantage. However, they are said to have approved the use of tape by the Danes.

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