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British Airways flight to Florida makes emergency landing in Bermuda when the phone starts to smoke

British Airways flight from Gatwick to Florida is diverted and emergency landing made in Bermuda after the business class passenger’s cell phone starts to smoke

  • BA 2167 flight from Gatwick went to Tampa, Florida on Saturday 5 February
  • About two hours from Florida, business class passengers reported smoke coming from a cell phone under a seat
  • The phone had fallen down the side of a passenger seat and crashed as they leaned back
  • Captain immediately sent the plane to Bermuda, 60 miles away, where the Boeing 777 was met by fire service personnel
  • The flight finally arrived in Tampa just three hours later than planned

A British Airways flight had to make an emergency landing after a passenger’s cell phone got overheated and started to smoke.

Vacationers in the business class section warned cabin crew when they saw smoke coming under one of the reclining seats.

The BA 2167 flight from Gatwick to Tampa in Florida flight was diverted to Bermuda and the Boeing 777 was met by firefighters on the runway.

All passengers were ordered out of the plane and their luggage left behind and fire fighters boarded the plane to remove the phone.

British Airways flight 2167 from Gatwick to Tampa in Florida on Saturday was forced into an emergency landing after a passenger's cell phone overheated and started to smoke

British Airways flight 2167 from Gatwick to Tampa in Florida on Saturday was forced into an emergency landing after a passenger’s cell phone overheated and started to smoke

Later, when the plane left, a member of the crew announced jokes: “The phone will never work again.”

A source aboard the Saturday flight told MailOnline: “We were about two hours from landing.

“A passenger was in business class and did not know that his phone had fallen down the side of his seat and that they had pressed a button to automatically adjust the seat. Their phone was crushed in the mechanism and started to smoke. “

“It was clearly quite frightening because we didn’t know if the phone would explode.

“But the captain was very calm, very sure, and said we were only 60 miles from Bermuda, so we went there.

“It was all resolved fairly quickly and we arrived in Tampa just three hours later than expected.”

Lithium ion batteries used in almost all mobile phones and laptops can overheat and catch fire.

The airline confirmed that the commander followed the aviation protocol for such incidents and landed the aircraft as quickly as possible.

A BA insider said that part of the adjustable seat had to be removed so that the overheated phone could be made safe.

A former BA captain told Mail Online: “Every fire on board during the flight is the most dangerous event that can occur. The priority is to get the plane on the ground as quickly as possible and this is what the captain did. “

The flight was diverted to Bermuda 60 miles away where it was met by fire fighters who picked up the phone. Passengers arrived in Tampa just three hours later than planned

The flight was diverted to Bermuda 60 miles away where it was met by fire fighters who picked up the phone. Passengers arrived in Tampa just three hours later than planned

The flight was diverted to Bermuda 60 miles away where it was met by fire fighters who picked up the phone. Passengers arrived in Tampa just three hours later than planned

A spokesperson confirmed the incident, but added: “Security is at the heart of everything we do and we are very sorry for the delay in our customers’ travel plans.

“We have done everything to minimize the delay after our flight to Bermuda as a precautionary measure after a cellphone got stuck in a chair and overheated.

“Our customers were taken care of and refreshments offered.”

The telephone incident is the newest specter in the sky involving a flight from British Airways.

MailOnline told last month how a captain had to put on an oxygen mask when he landed when his co-pilot was overcome by fumes in the cockpit.

The captain was in control of the control tower when his co-pilot was unable to continue flying the A320 jet from Athens to request an immediate landing at Heathrow Airport.

BA said the incident was due to a “smoke event” in which aviation insiders claimed that toxic engine vapors had leaked into the cockpit.

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