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Britain’s ugliest decking, 44ft in length and 16ft tall, must be torn down after family loses appeal

The 38-year-old sports center manager is losing his appeal to keep 44ft long £6,000 SUPER DECKING which he has installed on steel posts so his ‘kids can play in privacy’ as the long-running planning battle draws to a close

  • A South Wales family loses a job to keep ‘ugly’ decking
  • The 44ft long garden terrace is 16ft high and towers over the street below
  • Jamie Davies, 38, said he built the massive structure to give his family privacy
  • Originally he built the super terrace without a building permit from the municipality
  • A retroactive application is rejected for the ‘terrible’ structure

A family is about to lose a lengthy planning battle to preserve Britain’s ugliest garden patio, which measures 44 feet long and rises 16 feet above the street below.

Homeowner Jamie Davies, 38, placed the superstructure on a huge steel frame in an effort to give his family privacy in their garden in Blaina, South Wales.

But he failed to apply for planning permission for the mega decking that covers the slope of his modern detached garden.

Jamie’s bid for a retroactive building permit will be rejected after council planners said it was ‘too dominant a feature’.

It comes two years after Jamie first applied for retroactive approval for the £6,000 terrace and was denied.

The 44 foot long terrace (pictured) is supported by a massive steel frame and towers 16 feet high above the street below in Blaina, South Wales

The 44 foot long terrace (pictured) is supported by a massive steel frame and towers 16 feet high above the street below in Blaina, South Wales

Cllr Bernard Willis called the terrace 'the most horrible thing' he had ever seen in his life during a Blaenau Gwent council planning committee hearing

Cllr Bernard Willis called the terrace ‘the most horrible thing’ he had ever seen in his life during a Blaenau Gwent council planning committee hearing

Jamie, the manager of a sports center, said the verandah was built to “provide privacy for the children while they play”.

Planning Officer Joanne White said: “The application is not significantly different from the application previously denied by the planning committee and the planning inspector.

‘The decking to be preserved is located along the rear side boundary, at the front of the road.

‘The property is on a corner lot on the estate commonly known as ‘Tanglewood’ in Blaina.

‘The topography is such that Tanglewood Drive rises steeply from west to east.

‘The adjacent property on Tanglewood Drive is therefore at a considerably lower level than the site of the application.’

Ms White said there are “other ways” to increase the usable space of the garden.

She added: “I don’t see this as a reason to allow an unacceptable development.”

Ms White said the planning permission should be denied as it would be “an overly dominant feature” that would have an adverse visual “impact on the streetscape”.

The Blaenau Gwent Council will discuss the plans at a future meeting where the fate of the superdeck will be decided.

At a planning committee meeting in 2020 to consider another application to keep the same super patio, planning officials labeled the construction “ugly” and set an “undesirable precedent for similar construction across the estate.”

Homeowner Jamie Davies, 38, spent £6,000 on building the superstructure, which he says was intended to give his children privacy while they played in the garden

Homeowner Jamie Davies, 38, spent £6,000 on building the superstructure, which he says was intended to give his children privacy while they played in the garden

At Blaenau Gwent’s council planning committee meeting, Cllr Bernard Willis called the terrace “the most horrendous thing I’ve ever seen in my life,” according to South Wales Argus.

He continued: “If that were built near my house, I would be appalled.

“I hate to watch and I don’t think we should approve this application.”

Garden patio became popular from the late 1990s – with the makeover show Ground Force being blamed for the boom.

Retailer B&Q reported an increase in sales of the lawn alternative from £5,000 in 1997 to a staggering £16 million in 2001.

Presenter Alan Titchmarsh apologized for covering the lawn, saying at the time: “I’m sorry, I know it’s everywhere these days.”

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