Britain's longest-serving prisoner who brutally murdered 11 people could soon walk FREE

A forgotten serial killer who killed an priest with an ax will soon be able to walk freely through the streets.

Patrick & # 39; Pyscho & # 39; Mackay is one of the surviving inmates in the UK who has known that he has killed up to eleven people, including a four-year-old boy.

Names such as West, Shipman, Sutcliffe, Nilsen, Hindley and Brady have all dominated the headlines in recent years, but in 1975 it was Mackay who left the UK in horror after a series of horrific murders in London and Kent.

Remarkable photos show the various demented faces of the criminal who & # 39; the most dangerous man in Britain & # 39; hot during his trial, a battered body of a priest in a bathtub and the cold, dead eyes of a disturbed murderer staring directly into the camera. .

Portrait of a psychopath. Mackay in a photobooth with chicken that he got from his mother

Patrick Mackay Photoboothself portrait

Patrick Mackay Photoboothself portrait

Portrait of a psychopath: Mackay (left) in a photobooth with chicken that he took from his mother, while posing in a photobooth (right)

From left to right: Harold, Patrick, Marion and Ruth Mackay at home in the fifties. Behind the scenes, Harold would abuse his children

From left to right: Harold, Patrick, Marion and Ruth Mackay at home in the fifties. Behind the scenes, Harold would abuse his children

From left to right: Harold, Patrick, Marion and Ruth Mackay at home in the fifties. Behind the scenes, Harold would abuse his children

Detective chief inspector Peter Croxford with the crowbar that was used to kill Ivy Davies

Detective chief inspector Peter Croxford with the crowbar that was used to kill Ivy Davies

Another victim? 18 year old Heidi Mnilk. The teenage nanny was stabbed in the neck and thrown out of a moving train

Another victim? 18 year old Heidi Mnilk. The teenage nanny was stabbed in the neck and thrown out of a moving train

Detective chief inspector Peter Croxford (left) with the crowbar that was used to kill Ivy Davies, one of the victims of Patrick Mackay. Another of his possible victims, Heidi Mnilk (right), who was stabbed in the neck

How the case was reported in the Daily Mail in the mid-1970s

How the case was reported in the Daily Mail in the mid-1970s

Mackay was an arrogant psychopath who planned world domination under the name Franklin Bolvolt the First

Mackay was an arrogant psychopath who planned world domination under the name Franklin Bolvolt the First

The Daily Mail (left) reported the case in the mid-70s & # 39; 70 and presented Mackay (right) on the front and described him as the & # 39; crazy killer who let the law go & # 39;

These stomach-churning photos are part of John Lucas & # 39; new book Britain & # 39; s Forgotten Serial Killer: The Devil & Disciple, a detailed and dramatic account of the infamous by the Nazis. obsessed murderer and his victims.

& # 39; Convicted of three murders, suspected of another eight, Patrick David Mackay was called the Monster of Belgravia, the Disciple of the Devil and simply called The Psychopath, amid a flood of public anger over the way he repeatedly the grasp of the criminal justice system had slipped, & Lucas explained.

& # 39; When the authorities added it all up, Mackay had been locked up, segmented, or otherwise detained at least nineteen times before finally ending up for his horrific killing. & # 39;

Lucas said it was a cadaver that left the nation stunned and that Mackay could soon walk freely in the streets after being allowed to change his name.

A young Patrick Mackay (pictured above) plays with stolen garden gnomes in his garden in Gravesend. It was reported that neighbors also saw him playing with birds

A young Patrick Mackay (pictured above) plays with stolen garden gnomes in his garden in Gravesend. It was reported that neighbors also saw him playing with birds

A young Patrick Mackay (pictured above) plays with stolen garden gnomes in his garden in Gravesend. It was reported that neighbors also saw him playing with birds

A ten-year-old Patrick Mackay (pictured above) plays with sand figures while on vacation with his parents. The new book reveals that Patrick had made an effort to deal with his father's death and often told them that he was alive

A ten-year-old Patrick Mackay (pictured above) plays with sand figures while on vacation with his parents. The new book reveals that Patrick had made an effort to deal with his father's death and often told them that he was alive

A ten-year-old Patrick Mackay (pictured above) plays with sand figures while on vacation with his parents. The new book reveals that Patrick had made an effort to deal with his father's death and often told them that he was alive

On the left, an excerpt from Mackay's criminal record shows that he was a scammer from the age of eleven. On the right, Mackay's bill for the murder of Fr. Anthony Crean

On the left, an excerpt from Mackay's criminal record shows that he was a scammer from the age of eleven. On the right, Mackay's bill for the murder of Fr. Anthony Crean

On the left, an excerpt from Mackay's criminal record shows that he was a scammer from the age of eleven. On the right, Mackay's bill for the murder of Fr. Anthony Crean

& # 39; But the extraordinary story of this 22-year-old Nazi obsessive, who killed an ax with an ax with an ax and killed two older women during a ruthless robbery campaign on the chic streets of West London, was almost forgotten by the Christmas from 1975.

& # 39; It was expected that it would run and run. One of the unsolved cases that Mackay apparently had known in prison – but later denied when questioned – was the murder of a teenage puppet in a train and the horrific double murder of a widow and her four-year-old grandson.

The book also reveals that Mackay was also suspected of murdering a popular Essex cafe owner. Ivy Davis & # 39; body was found in her Westcliff-on-sea home with multiple wounds on her head, as well as a ligature around her neck on February 4, 1975.

In 2006, Essex Police interviewed the 68-year-old Basildon man who had been arrested as part of an assessment of the cold case. She was last seen when she left the cafe on the evening of February 3, 1975 and was discovered the next day by her daughter.

& # 39; While the police had made the first decision not to charge Mackay with those crimes, it seemed only a matter of time before more evidence came to light. But the charge never came true.

Murder victims Stephanie Britton and her four-year-old grandson Christopher Martin. Mackay would have admitted killing them, but later refused to confess

Murder victims Stephanie Britton and her four-year-old grandson Christopher Martin. Mackay would have admitted killing them, but later refused to confess

Murder victims Stephanie Britton and her four-year-old grandson Christopher Martin. Mackay would have admitted killing them, but later refused to confess

Disturbed Mackay admitted that she had murdered retired Sarah Rodmell. He later withdrew his confession. The photo shows blood on the doorstep of Sarah Rodmell in East London

Disturbed Mackay admitted that she had murdered retired Sarah Rodmell. He later withdrew his confession. The photo shows blood on the doorstep of Sarah Rodmell in East London

Police are looking for land close to Ivy Davies' house. Although the murder weapon was found in the house, a number of knives were turned in by the public

Police are looking for land close to Ivy Davies' house. Although the murder weapon was found in the house, a number of knives were turned in by the public

Mackay admitted that she had murdered retired Sarah Rodmell, whose blood (left) was seen on her doorstep in East London. The police are in the right place looking for land near another victim, the house of Ivy Davies

The book cover of the forgotten serial killer

The book cover of the forgotten serial killer

Patrick Mackay in his police mugshot

Patrick Mackay in his police mugshot

The book cover of & # 39; Britain & # 39; s forgotten serial killer & # 39; (left) written by John Lucas about Patrick Mackay (photo on the right in police mugshot)

& # 39; Maybe it was because Patrick Mackay, despite alleged surrender to fellow prisoners, didn't really kill all those people. But while he remains in prison today – still too dangerous to be released – each of those crimes remains unsolved. & # 39;

Mackay was born in 1952 and grew up in an abusive household and was regularly beaten by his alcoholic father. It was not long before Mackay committed crimes, in particular arson, animal abuse, theft and theft of garden gnomes.

Medical professions recognized that he had psychopathic tendencies and he was segmented in 1968. He was released four years later and would soon be responsible for the deaths of at least three people.

The killer soon developed a fascination with Nazism and often called himself & # 39; Franklin Bollvolt the First & # 39; and often spoke of his desire to wipe out the elderly & # 39 ;.

The team investigates the murder of Ivy Davies, who was killed with a crowbar. About thirty boxes of paperwork were collected

The team investigates the murder of Ivy Davies, who was killed with a crowbar. About thirty boxes of paperwork were collected

The team investigates the murder of Ivy Davies, who was killed with a crowbar. About thirty boxes of paperwork were collected

Cafe owner Ivy Davies, who was beaten to death in her front room

Cafe owner Ivy Davies, who was beaten to death in her front room

Widow, Isabella Griffiths, was murdered after a Valentine's Day meal with friends

Widow, Isabella Griffiths, was murdered after a Valentine's Day meal with friends

Cafe owner Ivy Davies (left) was beaten to death in her front room while widower Isabella Griffiths was murdered after a Valentine's Day meal with friends

Father Anthony Crean (pictured above) was murdered by Mackay after walking in a field near his house

Father Anthony Crean (pictured above) was murdered by Mackay after walking in a field near his house

Father Anthony Crean (pictured above) was murdered by Mackay after walking in a field near his house

He was convicted of three murders. Mackay & # 39; s first identified victim was 87-year-old widow Isabella Griffiths, who was strangled and stabbed in her home in Cheyne Walk, Chelsea. The next was Adele Price, 89, strangled at her home on Lowndes Square, Kensington.

Eventually, Mackay killed Father Anthony Crean in a frantic attack with his fists, a knife and an ax in the picturesque village of Shorne, Kent, causing the mutilated body of the 63-year-old grotesque to float in a bath full of bloody water.

Patrick Mackay: A timeline of his murders

Patrick Mackay had between three and eleven victims because not everything was confirmed. He was sentenced to prison for his life in 1975.

1965: Institutionalized to try to set fire to a Catholic church

1967: At the age of 15, Mackay was diagnosed as a psychopath by a psychiatrist; he joined Moss Side Hospital for four years

1972: Freed from the hospital

1973: He befriends father Anthony Crean and soon starts stealing from him

1973, July: Kills Heidi Mnilk, an au pair girl, by throwing her out of a train near New Cross

1973, July: Mary Hynes is beaten to death in her flat in Kentish Town

1974, January: Stephanie Britton and her four-year-old grandson were stabbed to death in Hadley Green, in Hertfordshire

1974, January: Throws a homeless person out of the Hungerford bridge

1974, February: Isabella Griffith's Chelsea home invaded, strangled her and killed her

1974: Bludgeoned a 62-year-old tobacconist to death

1974: Sarah Rodwell, 92 years old, was beaten to death on her doorstep in Hackney

1974: Ivy Davies, killed with an ax

1975: Kills father Crean with an ax

1975, March: Strangles Adele Price

1975 March 23: arrested

1975: Familiarities, but not all crimes were charged to him

The date was March 21, 1975. Two days later, Mackay was arrested.

But Mackay's heinous crimes probably didn't stay there.

Although he was charged with five counts of murder, Mackay's convictions were only for three cases of manslaughter for reduced responsibility.

The other two cases were allowed in the file, meaning that prosecutors believed they had sufficient evidence, but that a lawsuit was not considered to be in the public interest.

The first victim in this group was the 73-year-old widow Mary Hynes. She was suffocated and stabbed at her home in Willes Road, Kentish Town. Second was the 62-year-old shopkeeper Frank Goodman. He was battered with a piece of metal pipe on his site in Rock Street, Finsbury Park.

Finally, there were five unsolved murders, Mackay reportedly confessed when he was in prison, and the police later said he was not responsible. The victims in those cases were 18-year-old Heidi Mnilk, Stephanie Britton, Christopher Martin, Sarah Rodmell and Ivy Davies.

Mackay also admitted having killed an unidentified homeless person by pushing him into a canal. The body was never found.

Despite his alarming crimes and the filthy allegations surrounding Mackay, Lucas is concerned that the serial killer may soon be released from prison without the knowledge of the general public.

If he really killed eleven people, he would be the fifth most productive serial killer in the UK.

"Mackay faded into oblivion in the minds of the British public, much more than other serial killers of his time", Lucas added.

& # 39; He has even been able to change his name and obtain the right to live in an open prison – the first step towards ultimate freedom – without a bit of publicity about the decision.

& # 39; Far from being one of Britain's most infamous prisoners, he is not even recognized as the country's longest living prisoner.

& # 39; That title was wrongly held by assassin John Massey before being released in May 2018, although he was imprisoned seven months after Mackay in May 1976. & # 39;

Lucas said that most assume that the flamboyant and infamous Charlie Bronson now holds the record, but that is not the case.

& # 39; Instead, it's the forgotten serial killer, Patrick Mackay, who has been in the longest.

& # 39; It is worth noting that Mackay may have had some influence on his low profile.

& # 39; Unlike other killers such as Dennis Nilsen and Ian Brady, it is not known that Mackay ever responded to a letter from & # 39; fans & # 39; or & # 39; pen-pals & # 39; that would inevitably have sold a response to the newspapers.

& # 39; Maybe it was a calculated move, maybe it was a result of poor literacy.

& The question remains: was Patrick Mackay really one of the most productive serial killers in Britain, as detectives originally suspected?

& # 39; That mystery is what this book wants to explore. & # 39;

John Lucas & # 39; s Forgotten Serial Killer: The Devil & # 39; s Disciple, published by Pen and Sword Books, will be available in July.