Brian McFadden and Fiance Danielle Parkinson Reveal They Were Playing Golf When Her Waters ruptured

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Brian McFadden and his fiancée Danielle Parkinson have revealed they were golfing when the new mom’s waters broke.

The former Westlife star, 41, and his 39-year-old partner’s little girl arrived on May 8 via emergency cesarean section, now announcing her name is Ruby Jean.

The couple was finally able to welcome their first child together after IVF treatment and two miscarriages.

New arrival: Brian McFadden, 41, and his fiancée Danielle Parkinson, 39, have revealed they were golfing when the new mum’s waters broke

Speaking of the shock arrival of their little girl, Danielle recalled OK! Magazine that she was playing golf when she went into labor earlier than expected.

The new mom recalled scheduling a cesarean section for Sunday, as her baby had been breech for a while, but she gave birth early on Friday.

Brian smiled at his beautiful wife-to-be and said, “It all happened so fast!”

Danielle then explained: ‘We went home and at 8pm I started having weird pains and at 10pm they were severe so we went to the hospital.

Sweet: The former Westlife star and his partner's little girl, Ruby Jean, were born via emergency C-section on May 8

Sweet: The former Westlife star and his partner’s little girl, Ruby Jean, were born via emergency C-section on May 8

“There was a line in front of the theater so I had to go through these contractions, which were terrible. I was in so much pain and desperate for pain relief.”

When she was seen in the hospital, Danielle was only an inch dilated and in agony, and Ruby then went a little “distressed,” meaning everything started moving quickly.

Danielle continued: ‘But then it sounds disgusting, she pooped in me and that means they’re a little confused, so they took me straight to the emergency area.

“I was kind of thankful she did because the contractions were the worst pain I’ve ever experienced.”

Reflecting on the pain, Danielle said gas and air “didn’t touch the sides” and that if she has another child, she’ll get an “epidural” and “all the pain relief.”

Excited: The couple were finally able to welcome their first child together after IVF treatment and two miscarriages, and recently shared their birth story with OK!

Excited: The couple were finally able to welcome their first child together after IVF treatment and two miscarriages, and recently shared their birth story with OK!

Brian – who also has Molly, 19, and Lily-Sue, 18, with ex-wife Kerry Katona – predicted that his wife-to-be would demand drugs even though she had planned a natural birth.

He recalled how, as they prepared for Ruby’s arrival and took prenatal classes, he had a feeling that even though Danielle said she wanted to give birth as naturally as possible, she would take some medicine during labor.

The pair said they were surprised by how quickly Ruby was delivered and are grateful she is healthy, with proud mum Danielle saying the experience was “surreal.”

West Life star Brian and his partner announced in December that they were expecting their first child together.

He knew it: Brian — who also has Molly, 19, and Lily-Sue, 18, with ex-wife Kerry Katona — predicted that his wife-to-be would demand drugs even though she planned a natural birth

He knew it: Brian — who also has Molly, 19, and Lily-Sue, 18, with ex-wife Kerry Katona — predicted that his wife-to-be would demand drugs even though she planned a natural birth

Brian and Danielle first shared the joyous pregnancy news in an interview with OK! magazine, revealing that their bundle of joy would arrive in May, after nearly two years of IVF treatments.

Danielle told the publication at the time: ‘It does’ [feel like a miracle] but i feel terrible to say that because i have had so many posts on instagram.

“The IVF community is so nice and I’ve heard really traumatic stories from people who have been trying for ten years, people who have had more than eight miscarriages, so I think we got lucky on our third attempt.”

During the interview, the couple also revealed that Zara Phillips and Mike Tindall – who had miscarried themselves – put them in touch with a nutritionist, who they say helped them conceive.

Didn't go to plan: Unfortunately, Ruby decided to poop while still in her mother, which meant she had to have an immediate cesarean section

Didn’t go to plan: Unfortunately, Ruby decided to poop while still in her mother, which meant she had to have an immediate cesarean section

“Mike and Zara put us in touch with Simone, the nutritionist who prepared us for this time,” Brian said.

“After the miscarriage, we sat with them and talked. This woman would put us on a certain diet, and Mike guaranteed it would work. He was absolutely right.’

The couple previously revealed that they suffered a ‘devastating’ miscarriage in late 2019 after a year-long IVF trip.

They opened up about their fertility struggle in OK! magazine, explaining that they tried to conceive naturally for two years before turning to doctors for help.

Danielle, who suffers from low egg count, shared how happy she was to conceive during the couple’s first round of IVF but was heartbroken when she lost the baby at five weeks.

Helping Hand: The couple credited Zara Phillips and Mike Tindall - who have had a miscarriage themselves - for reaching out to a nutritionist to help them conceive

Helping Hand: The couple credited Zara Phillips and Mike Tindall – who have had a miscarriage themselves – for reaching out to a nutritionist to help them conceive

Danielle said, ‘It was terrible. They [the gynaecologist] showed us that my uterus was empty. I was in tears – I felt numb. Brian was upset too, but he was very strong for me.”

Brian added: “We were devastated. I didn’t believe the baby was gone…it was the worst sinking feeling ever.’

Danielle explained that she has a pretty low AMH [Anti-Müllerian hormone], which means she produces eggs, but there are only a few of them.

Danielle previously explained that they had also considered a surrogate and adoption as other options for the future.

Struggle: Danielle, who suffers from low egg count, previously shared how happy she was to conceive during the couple's first round of IVF but was heartbroken when she lost the baby at five weeks (pictured with Brian's daughter Lily)

Struggle: Danielle, who suffers from low egg count, previously shared how happy she was to conceive during the couple’s first round of IVF but was heartbroken when she lost the baby at five weeks (pictured with Brian’s daughter Lily)

How does IVF work?

In vitro fertilization, also known as IVF, is a medical procedure in which a woman has an already fertilized egg inserted into her uterus to become pregnant.

It is used when couples cannot conceive naturally and a sperm and egg are removed from their bodies and combined in a lab before the embryo is inserted into the woman.

Once the embryo is in the womb, the pregnancy should continue normally.

The procedure can be done with eggs and sperm from a couple or those from donors.

Guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommend that IVF on the NHS be offered to women under 43 who have been trying to conceive through regular unprotected sex for two years.

People can also pay for IVF privately, which costs an average of £3,348 for a single cycle, according to figures published in January 2018, and there’s no guarantee of success.

The NHS says success rates for women under 35 are about 29 percent, with the chance of a successful cycle declining as they get older.

It is thought that about eight million babies have been born as a result of IVF since the very first case, British woman Louise Brown, was born in 1978.

Chance of success

The IVF success rate depends on the age of the woman undergoing treatment, as well as the cause of the infertility (if known).

Younger women are more likely to have a successful pregnancy.

IVF is usually not recommended for women over the age of 42, as the chances of a successful pregnancy are considered too small.

Between 2014 and 2016, the percentage of IVF treatments that resulted in a live birth was:

29 percent for women under 35

23 percent for women aged 35 to 37

15 percent for women aged 38 to 39

9 percent for women aged 40 to 42

3 percent for women aged 43 to 44

2 percent for women over 44 years old

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