Brexit: EU urges May to red lines DROP because PM has no confidence in the vote

Theresa May is facing the threat of the government's collapse today as ministers openly clashed about a Plan B & # 39; for the Brexit.

In the wake of the disastrous defeat of her deal, the Prime Minister faces a desperate struggle to avoid a civil war between the remnants and Eurosceptics in her senior team.

Mrs. May said that she will open discussions & # 39; with high parliamentarians from other parties, while trying to forge a parliamentary majority for further steps. Her effective assistant sheriff David Lidington is in charge of the charm offensive.

But the prime minister came out of the fight this afternoon when she insisted that the UK would still leave the EU at the end of March, and again ruled out a customs union with the bloc.

Minister of Justice David Gauke seemed to contradict Ms. May this afternoon by warning that it was no longer possible for the government to include ourselves & # 39; & # 39; with red lines like the customs union.

And Chancellor Philip Hammond would have suggested to corporate executives last night in a phone call that article 50 would be extended and that the government would have a new era & # 39; introduced in her approach.

The Tory split was deepened after a cabinet meeting yesterday, where the remaining ministers, including Amber Rudd, Greg Clark and Mr. Gauke, once again urged Ms. May to vote for & # 39; indicative votes & # 39; in the Commons to talk about how they can proceed with the Brexit.

A cabinet source told MailOnline a more aggressive group led by Jeremy Hunt, Sajid Javid, Gavin Williamson and Andrea Leadsom gave the idea a "good kick & # 39 ;. Another said that the proposal was heavy & # 39; used to be.

Tory chairman Brandon Lewis also waded by warning that party activists would not tolerate Mrs. May in preparing Labor MPs for a soft Brexit.

Theresa launched a fierce attack on the Labor leader in brutal battles at PMQ's, anticipating a no-confidence motion tonight

Theresa launched a fierce attack on the Labor leader in brutal battles at PMQ's, anticipating a no-confidence motion tonight

Minister of Justice David Gauke hinted today that he wants the government to support a permanent customs union with the EU

Minister of Justice David Gauke hinted today that he wants the government to support a permanent customs union with the EU

Chancellor Philip Hammond would have suggested in a call to company managers that article 50 would be extended

Chancellor Philip Hammond would have suggested in a call to company managers that article 50 would be extended

Justice Minister David Gauke (pictured today) hinted that he wants the government to support a permanent customs union with the EU. Chancellor Philip Hammond (right) would have suggested in a call to company managers to extend article 50

Andrea Leadsom (photo) suggested that Ms. May did not want to reach Brexit with Jeremy Corbyn - him as & # 39; insincere & # 39; stamped and not prepared & construct; & # 39; to participate

Andrea Leadsom (photo) suggested that Ms. May did not want to reach Brexit with Jeremy Corbyn - him as & # 39; insincere & # 39; stamped and not prepared & construct; & # 39; to participate

Andrea Leadsom (photo) suggested that Ms. May did not want to reach Brexit with Jeremy Corbyn – him as & # 39; insincere & # 39; stamped and not prepared & construct; & # 39; to participate

How do the cabinet fractions break down?

The cabinet has been able – almost everywhere – to unite around the delivery of the Brexit deal from Theresa May.

But now that it has been destroyed in the Commons, simmering tensions are coming to a boil.

Two different factions have emerged, in which a group that is engaged continues to insist on a softer approach that parliamentarians reach for different parties – and Brexiteers adopt a more aggressive attitude.

REMAINERS

Philip Hammond

Focused on preventing the economic failure of Brexit and preventing a left-wing Corbyn administration, it is assumed that it considers both no-deal and failure to take the UK out of the EU as unacceptable.

Stayed up the queue above & # 39; indicative voices & # 39 ;, but will probably give up the Restfaction side on the need to protect business interests.

Amber Rudd

Before she was returned to the cabinet in November, Rudd had focused on the campaign for a second Brexit referendum.

Since then, she has been calling for & # 39; indicative votes & # 39; in the cabinet and urged the government not to agree with Brexit.

Greg Clark

Has broken the ranks to publicly warn that no deal would be a disaster, and suggested that he stop if government policy would be.

David Gauke

Another is preparing to stop if the government goes for nothing and has hinted that he wants to join a permanent customs union to become government policy.

Karen Bradley

She is a long-term ally of Ms. May and usually follows the leadership of the prime minister, but is generally on the side of the remaining ones.

BREXITEERS

Jeremy Hunt

A loyal perennial in the referendum, the Minister of Foreign Affairs has since been reborn as an avid Brexiteer – with much speculation about his leadership ambitions.

Led it & # 39; kicking & # 39; for the & # 39; indicative votes & # 39; proposal, and was against the exclusion of no deal.

Sajid Javid

Another favorite for Tory's leadership, has taken a practical approach, but would be a managed & # 39; no-deal can support Brexit above the postponement or cancellation of Article 50.

Michael Gove

After leading the Leave campaign with Boris Johnson as a spearhead, he has been remarkably loyal to May's deal since he hesitated to retire in November.

Does not want a no-deal, but is adamant, the Brexit must happen and is deeply opposed to a second referendum.

Gavin Williamson

Strongly opposed to the idea of ​​& # 39; indicative voting & # 39 ;, and close to the DUP, Mr. Williamson has had a tendency to take sides for the Brexiteers. He also accommodates leadership ambitions that would be supported by a hard attitude.

Andrea Leadsom

One of the original Brexiteers in the cabinet, adamant that there should be no delays and no compromise on canceling or holding a referendum.

The Premier has stayed behind to find a way forward after suffering the biggest Commons loss ever for a government, with an extraordinary 118 Tories rebelling against the plan.

More than a third of the parliamentary party joined Labor to reduce Ms May's withdrawal agreement by 432 votes to 202 – a majority of 230 – on a dramatic day in Westminster.

Shortly after the result was announced, Mr. Corbyn announced that he would be submitting a vote of no confidence, which the MPs will approve tonight, in an attempt to enforce a general election.

But the Northern Irish allies of the Prime Minister, and Brexiteers like Boris Johnson Jacob Rees-Mogg have all pledged to support her, which means she will probably survive.

In the House this afternoon, Mr Corbyn challenged Mrs. May to agree to a permanent customs union with the EU, and did not rule out a deal with the Brexit.

But Ms. May fired back: "There are actually two ways of not reaching agreement, the first is to agree on a deal, and the second would be to withdraw Article 50.

"That would mean that we remain in the European Union, that we do not respect the result of the referendum – and that is something that this government will not do. & # 39;

The challenging attitude came when the EU and parliamentarians were pressing for Ms. May to change course, calling for another national voice, and Michel Barnier urged her to "red lines". to drop.

Ms. May's flight routes seem to close, with EU signaling as a hard line. The main negotiator of the block, Mr Barnier, dared the Prime Minister by demanding that it respond by renouncing its long-standing negotiating positions, such as ending free movement, excluding a permanent customs union and ending the jurisdiction of EU law.

While he said that he & # 39; sad & # 39; was, the deal was rejected, Mr. Barnier stated that the defeat a "chance" & # 39; was to stay closer to the EU.

Ms. May said that veteran, front left, Corbyn (pictured today) would increase taxes, destroy jobs and destroy government finances

Ms. May said that veteran, front left, Corbyn (pictured today) would increase taxes, destroy jobs and destroy government finances

Ms. May said that veteran, front left, Corbyn (pictured today) would increase taxes, destroy jobs and destroy government finances

Today to Downing Street, where Ms. May can still face a fight for her political life with a vote of confidence that could lead to a general election at 7:00 pm tonight

Today to Downing Street, where Ms. May can still face a fight for her political life with a vote of confidence that could lead to a general election at 7:00 pm tonight

Today to Downing Street, where Ms. May can still face a fight for her political life with a vote of confidence that could lead to a general election at 7:00 pm tonight

Interviewed at the Politics Live of the BBC, Mr. Gauke showed a hint that he wanted the government to support a permanent customs union.

I think that today's position is given what happened at the House of Commons yesterday when we were very badly beaten, the Prime Minister said rightly that we should involve parliament, we must do so in a constructive way, & # 39 ; he said.

"When it comes to a customs union, our principle is that we are in favor of leaving the customs union so that we can conclude trade agreements and no longer trade on WTO terms with third countries.

& # 39; But at this stage, what we do is maintain a parliamentary opinion. & # 39;

Mr Gauke insisted that leaving the customs union still be a red line & # 39; was: & # 39; I do not think we can pack ourselves today, what we need to do is speak to the whole Parliament and see what ideas come to the fore where the support is for those specific ideas.

& # 39; And at that moment we have to make an assessment – is there anything that is negotiable with the European Union or something that could have a large majority in the House of Commons?

& Today it's all about judging where the numbers are. & # 39;

The premier's spokesman played the cabinet's split over the customs union following Mr Gauke's remarks and insisted that Mrs May's policy had not changed.

He said: & # 39; His starting point is that it has advantages to be outside customs and that is the government's policy. & # 39;

He also denied that the Prime Minister had softened its policy of extending Article 50 and delaying Brexit.

He said: & # 39; It is the government's policy to leave the European Union on 29 March 2019 – that is, of course, the government's long standing position.

What they did was respond to the suggestion of others that if Parliament was unable to make a decision or another situation arose, some people would have the impression that the government's one-sided ability is to be able to extend Article 50 – that is not the case. It would require the ratification and agreement of the other 27 Member States. & # 39;

Mrs Leadsom said this morning that the Prime Minister would not necessarily have to look for new ideas that no one had thought of before, but "looking for consensus, a new initiative to find a solution" which can be negotiated with the EU and that would be a majority in the House of Commons & # 39;

How does the Brexit vote compare with earlier Commons showdowns?

166 – Workers' government in 1924

The greatest defeat of the government in modern times occurred on 8 October 1924, when the minority government of Ramsay MacDonald's government lost a vote with 364 votes against 198.

A Liberal Party amendment was voted to establish a limited committee to revoke the government's decision to bring criminal proceedings against JR Campbell, editor of the communist newspaper Workers Weekly, which recently article in which the armed forces were encouraged to mutiny.

89 – Labor government in 1979

On 22 March 1979, in the last few weeks of the Labor government led by Jim Callaghan, MEPs voted on a motion to cancel the fee for a firearms certificate.

Although the participating numbers were low, the government lost 115 to 26.

86 – Labor government in 1978

The biggest post-war defeat in which at least half of the MPs participated. It happened on January 25, 1978, when MPs voted 204 to 118 against an opposition amendment on the Scottish Devolution Bill of the Callaghan government.

The legislation had excluded Orkney and Shetland from the provisions of the bill when they were in a referendum & # 39; no & # 39; had voted.

But the Cabinet minister suggested that Ms. May did not want to contact Mr Corbyn – him as "insincere". stamped and not willing to constructively & # 39; to participate.

& # 39; He has not submitted a specific constructive proposal and that is a problem. That is why the prime minister will occupy himself everywhere in Parliament with those who have taken very sincere views, but who want to show constructively what the vast majority of MEPs voted for, "Mrs Leadsom told BBC Radio 4 & # 39; s Today- program.

Mr. Hammond and business secretary Clark used a personal telephone conversation to tell business leaders not to expect changes in the legal Brexit withdrawal text, but rather the political statement on future relations with the EU, according to government sources.

Mr. Hammond told the attendees that the government does not have any 'obstruction & # 39; would imply a plan by Tory MP Nick Boles to give senior backbenchers a role in finding a solution to the impasse, according to the Financial Times. The plan could delay the article 50 process after March.

& # 39; We must first contact MPs in the Commons, & # 39; the Chancellor would have said. & # 39; There is a large majority in the Commons that opposes no-deal. & # 39;

Other business leaders said that Mr. Hammond had said that the government had a "new era". entered into its Brexit policy.

When he spoke to the European Parliament in Strasbourg this morning, Mr Barnier said that the deal on the table was still the best available, unless Mrs May dropped her red stripes.

"If the United Kingdom chooses to change its red lines in the future and that it takes this choice to take advantage of the ambition to go beyond a simple, but not negligible, free trade agreement, the European Union would be ready immediately to .. respond positively, & # 39; he said.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel also put pressure on Ms. May, who said it was up to her to propose solutions.

& # 39; We still have time to negotiate, but we are now waiting for what the Prime Minister is proposing, & # 39; Ms. May told reporters.

The margin of 230 in the vote on Ms. May's deal was by far the largest defeat of the government that was recorded, higher than the 166 votes that the Labor minority government lost in 1924.

Cheers could be heard by the mass of protesters who had gathered outside Parliament, while the news flew through – while the EU reacted to her horror.

After getting up for a while, a clearly startled Mrs. May insisted that the government would listen & # 39; and announced that she would fight with a vote of no confidence today – and really encouraged Mr Corbyn to name one.

He immediately accepted the challenge and said that they end the line & # 39; had reached and that general elections were now essential.

Mrs. May said that while it's clear & # 39; was, the House did not support her deal, but that there was no clarity about what MPs did.

& # 39; It is clear that the House does not support this deal. But tonight's voice does not tell us anything about what it does support. Nothing about how – or even if – it wants to respect the decision of the British people in a referendum that Parliament has decided to keep, "she said.

"People, especially EU citizens who have let their home here and UK citizens live in the EU, deserve clarity on these questions as quickly as possible, and those whose jobs depend on our trade with the EU need that clarity." ;

Downing Street sources said in the aftermath of the devastating result, that the Brexit process threatens to collapse further, it would reach out to senior parliamentarians & # 39; in an attempt to find a way forward.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel pressed Mrs May under pressure by saying that it was the PM that proposed the Brexit solutions

German Chancellor Angela Merkel pressed Mrs May under pressure by saying that it was the PM that proposed the Brexit solutions

German Chancellor Angela Merkel pressed Mrs May under pressure by saying that it was the PM that proposed the Brexit solutions

The EU chief negotiator, Michel Barnier (represented today in the European Parliament), encouraged Ms May by demanding that she answer by renouncing her old bargaining positions, such as ending freedom of movement, excluding a permanent customs office. union and the termination of the jurisdiction of EU law

The EU chief negotiator, Michel Barnier (represented today in the European Parliament), encouraged Ms May by demanding that she answer by renouncing her old bargaining positions, such as ending freedom of movement, excluding a permanent customs office. union and the termination of the jurisdiction of EU law

The EU chief negotiator, Michel Barnier (represented today in the European Parliament), encouraged Ms May by demanding that she answer by renouncing her old bargaining positions, such as ending freedom of movement, excluding a permanent customs office. union and the termination of the jurisdiction of EU law

The pound rose sharply against the US dollar and the euro, as the markets apparently concluded that the UK's departure from the EU had become less likely.

Remainers and Brexiteers were jubilant about the rout, with Mr. Johnson saying it was even bigger than he expected and demanding that the Irish border be left backstop.

Pro-EU factions seized the outcome to call for a second referendum, with prime minister Nicola Sturgeon welcoming the government's relapse and the Lib Dems saying that this is the beginning of the end of the Brexit & # 39; used to be.

Former Ukip leader Nigel Farage has Tory MPs who believe in Brexit & # 39; summoned to be brave and to oppose the late date of Article 50 of March 29 – and urged them to dump May as prime minister and to replace her with a Brexiteer who called it a Neville Chamberlain moment.

Assuming that she survives the motion of censure, Ms May has until 21 January to draw up a Plan B, with the clock that fits on the planned Brexit date in just 73 days on 29 March.

Jean-Claude Juncker, who had canceled travel plans to be in the wake of the vote in Brussels, & # 39; regrets & # 39; from the defeat of what he & # 39; the best possible deal & # 39; called.

He said in a statement: "The risk of a disorderly withdrawal from the UK has increased with tonight's vote. Although we do not want this to happen, the European Commission will continue its emergency work to ensure that the EU is fully prepared.

I urge the United Kingdom to clarify its intentions as soon as possible.

Donald Tusk said in a tweet that he thought the Brexit could now be canceled. & # 39; If a deal is impossible and nobody wants no deal, who finally has the courage to say what the only positive solution is? & # 39; He wrote.

How did you vote MP? 202 voted for and 432 in a historic - and devastating - commons defeat for the prime minister

How did you vote MP? 202 voted for and 432 in a historic - and devastating - commons defeat for the prime minister

How did you vote MP? 202 voted for and 432 in a historic – and devastating – commons defeat for the prime minister

There is a virtually unlimited number of possible scenarios of what could happen in the wake of a defeat and many will depend on the margin in tonight's vote.

"I became Prime Minister immediately after the referendum and I believe it is my duty to deliver the result." Theresa May's response to her Brexit defeat completely

Mr President, Parliament has spoken and the government will listen. It is clear that Parliament does not support this deal. Tonight's voice does not tell us anything about what it supports. Nothing about how or even if it wants to honor the decision of the British people in a referendum that the Parliament decided to keep.

People, especially European Union citizens who have made their home here and people from the UK living in the EU, deserve clarity about these questions as quickly as possible.

Those whose jobs depend on trade with the EU need clarification.

Firstly, we need to confirm whether this government still enjoys the confidence of Parliament. I believe it is, but given the scale and importance of tonight's vote, it is good that others get the chance to test that question if they want to.

I can therefore confirm that, if the official opposition table tonight is a vote of confidence in the form required by the law on parliaments of limited duration, the government will take the time to debate this motion tomorrow. [Jeremy Corbyn later did so, with a vote to be held today.]

Secondly, if Parliament confirms confidence in this government, I will then discuss with my colleagues, our trust and supply partners, the DUP and high-level parliamentarians from across the country to see what is needed to support it. Parliament. The government will approach these meetings in a constructive spirit, but in view of the urgent need to make progress, we must concentrate on ideas that are genuinely negotiable and receive sufficient support in this House.

If these meetings yield such ideas, the government will then explore them with the European Union.

I want to end by offering two reassurances. First, for those who fear the government's strategy to run around the clock until March 29: this is not our strategy. I have always believed that the best way to continue is to leave with a good deal in an orderly fashion and have negotiated most of the last two years.

We respect the will of the House [on the Grieve amendment for a ‘Plan B’] and we will submit an editable motion on Monday.

My second reassurance is for the British who voted to leave the European Union in the referendum two and a half years ago. I became prime minister immediately after the referendum and I believe it is my duty to give their instructions and I intend to do so.

Every day that passes without this problem being solved means more uncertainty, more bitterness and more resentment.

The government has heard what this House has said tonight, but I ask Members from all sides of Parliament to listen to the British who want to settle this issue. And to work with the government to do exactly that.

Surprised by Brexit? Here's all you need to know about the plots, the votes and the deals (and what the Commons showdown of REALLY REALLY means)

MPs voted last night about Theresa May's Brexit plan in what would have been Parliament's most important decision since the Second World War.

The prime minister suffered a catastrophic defeat at the crunch vote, where MPs confiscated their weakness to push their own plans for the future of Great Britain to the EU.

Politicians are deeply divided as to whether the Brexit should be soft or harsh and whether the UK should opt for a Norway-style deal or plan for Canada plus.

But the conditions and arguments used by MPs are often steeped in jargon and chatter to the ordinary Briton.

Here are some of the things that will help you to finally understand the Brexit debate that shakes Britain and its Parliament.

Theresa May (pictured today in the Commons) has signed a deal with the EU - but MPs are expected to vote with a massive majority today

Theresa May (pictured today in the Commons) has signed a deal with the EU - but MPs are expected to vote with a massive majority today

Theresa May (pictured today in the Commons) has signed a deal with the EU – but MPs are expected to vote with a massive majority today

1. Plan B – what is it and why do we need one?

Theresa May has signed a deal with the EU, but parliamentarians voted for it by a huge majority last night, which means she has to come up with a Plan B.

And last week's weekly MPs passed an amendment by Tory Remainer Dominic Grieve, who gave the Prime Minister only three working days to come up with her new plan.

It means that she will be returned to the Commons on Monday to explain what she will do next.

The Prime Minister has so far refused to say what her plan B will be, but she is under great pressure to exclude a no-deal Brexit and to say in which direction she intends to finish the discussions in the next round.

It is believed that the former ministers of Tory Oliver Letwin and Dominic Grieve (photo) are also involved in the conspiracy and have launched a plot to try to take over the Brexit talks

It is believed that the former ministers of Tory Oliver Letwin and Dominic Grieve (photo) are also involved in the conspiracy and have launched a plot to try to take over the Brexit talks

It is believed that the former ministers of Tory Oliver Letwin and Dominic Grieve (photo) are also involved in the conspiracy and have launched a plot to try to take over the Brexit talks

The rest will want them to opt for a Norway-style deal, leaving the UK on the internal market and thus free movement or a second referendum.

While Brexiteers will insist on the Premier for a Canada-style deal that will take Britain completely out of the customs union and the EU internal market.

2. The remaining plot – who is behind it and how would it work?

A group of Tory Remainers has launched a plot to try to take over the Brexit talks if the Prime Minister can not come up with a plan within three days.

Tory MP Nick Boles said that if this happens, the Liaison Committee – a committee of 32 senior MPs dominated by Remainers – should take over the talks.

It is assumed that the former ministers of Tory Oliver Letwin and Dominic Grieve are also involved in the plot.

This plan to keep the government out of business would violate the rules of the Parliament, but Commons Speaker John Bercow – who would have the final word if this is possible or not – has made it clear that he would like to rewrite the rules when it comes to Brexit.

No10 is of the opinion that if the plan succeeds, the MPs in the committee will insist on a softer Brexit, for example to conclude a Norway-style agreement that would keep the UK on the internal market and thus the free movement of people would guarantee.

3. No deal – what would it mean for Britain and who is against it?

Britain is locked up in talks with the EU to beat a Brexit deal, but if a new plan can not be agreed quickly, the UK will go bankrupt without a deal.

But many MPs have warned that they will do what it takes to get a & # 39; no deal & # 39; to block – out of fear that this is disrupting the UK economy.

And a series of ministers from the cabinet, including Greg Clark, Amber Rudd and David Gauke are expected to leave the cabinet in anger if the prime minister then backs a no-deal Brexit.

Economic experts have issued terrible warnings about the lack of an agreement with the CBI, which says it can cut 8 percent off the British economy and land in a huge recession.

But there is a group of die-hard Brexiteers in the Tory party, including Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg, leader of the European Research Group, who say there is nothing to fear for a no-deal Brexit.

This group sees the pursuit of a no-deal Brexit as a step in the direction of their goal to conclude a trade agreement between Canada and the EU.

Jeremy Corbyn (pictured today in the Commons) hopes to grab the chaos if the premier's deal is rejected today to file a no-motion motion and try to overthrow Ms. May from number 10

Jeremy Corbyn (pictured today in the Commons) hopes to grab the chaos if the premier's deal is rejected today to file a no-motion motion and try to overthrow Ms. May from number 10

Jeremy Corbyn (pictured today in the Commons) hopes to grab the chaos if the premier's deal is rejected today to file a no-motion motion and try to overthrow Ms. May from number 10

4. No trust Voting – what is it and who supports it?

Jeremy Corbyn took Theresa May's challenge to submit a vote of no confidence in the government in the aftermath of the vote on the withdrawal deal.

If the prime minister has lost the vote, another candidate has 14 working days to hold and win a vote of confidence from MPs – if they do so, they become Prime Minister.

If no party leader can do this within two weeks, a general election will be chosen.

But it is unlikely that the Labor leader can win the support of a single MP from the ranks of the Tories or the DUP – meaning that his attempt to topple Ms. May is likely to fail.

5. General elections – how can someone be called and who wants it?

Labor has demanded an election, while many commentators believe that the Tories will eventually have to make a new election to break the political deadlock in Parliament.

Under the law on parliament for a definite period, Ms. May needs the Commons to agree to a new election – and many MPs will be killed against the plan that they fear will cost their seats, and Mr. Corbyn will keys of No. 10 can hand over.

But if the prime minister's deal is voted down and parliamentarians can not find an alternative before the UK leaves on March 29, an election can be promised to recruit new parliamentarians who might close a deal.

Many MPs insist on a second referendum, less than three years after the voters supported the Brexit (photo of the voting booth)

Many MPs insist on a second referendum, less than three years after the voters supported the Brexit (photo of the voting booth)

Many MPs insist on a second referendum, less than three years after the voters supported the Brexit (photo of the voting booth)

6. Second referendum – why should we need one and what would the question be?

Many MPs insist on a second referendum, less than three years after the voters supported the Brexit.

Remnants argue that with parliamentarians who can not reach a deal with each other, the only way to go further is to send the question back to the public.

Many Labor MPs, the Lib Dems and a powerful group of Tory MPs all support a second referendum.

But Ms. May has repeatedly ruled out that she is holding one while she is prime minister, and even those who support the plan are at odds with what must be on the ballot.

Some remnants believe that voters should be given a choice between the Prime Minister's plan and remain on current terms in the EU, but some others believe that Brexit should be offered on the terms of the World Trade Organization.

7. Who is Gareth Johnson, the latest Tory to leave the government?

Tory MP Gareth Johnson stopped as a whip whose job is to persuade his co-conservative MPs to support the prime minister's plan – so that he could resist the deal.

He is the last in a long line of Tory MPs who have withdrawn as assistant and preacher to express their objections to her blueprint.

The MP for Dartford has a strong leave support chair and he was named assistant whip in November last year, one of the most junior ranks.

Sources said that he & # 39; desperately & # 39; had come to power, but pointed out that his constituents were overwhelming Brexit supporters.

He resigned today and said that he is "loyalty to the country above loyalty to the government." suggested.

.