Brett Kavanaugh's mother cries in her confirmation hearing

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh mourned his mother Martha at her Senate confirmation hearing on Tuesday

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh made his mother cry at the Senate confirmation hearing by referring to her love for her family during her opening speech.

Kavanaugh's mother, Martha, was seen wiping her tears as she listened to her son address senators on the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday afternoon.

Sitting directly behind her son, Martha nodded and smiled when Kavanaugh expressed his love for his family, whom he first introduced to the nation in July, when Trump officially nominated him to the Supreme Court.

He began to get excited just when Kavanaugh was choking a little when he talked about his father's work ethic and his shared love for sports.

"A life of friendship, forged in the stadium seats on hot dogs and beer," he said of their relationship.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh mourned his mother Martha at her Senate confirmation hearing on Tuesday

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh mourned his mother Martha at her Senate confirmation hearing on Tuesday

Kavanaugh's mother, Martha (above, next to her father Everett) could be seen wiping away tears as she listened to her son address the senators on Tuesday in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Kavanaugh's mother, Martha (above, next to her father Everett) could be seen wiping away tears as she listened to her son address the senators on Tuesday in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Kavanaugh's mother, Martha (above, next to her father Everett) could be seen wiping away tears as she listened to her son address the senators on Tuesday in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

He said of his wife Ashley: "This has not been exactly the summer that she had planned for our family. I am grateful for your love and inspiration. Ashley is a kind soul. She always sees kindness in others. She has made me a better person and a better judge. I thank God every day for my family. "

He said his daughters Margaret and Liza will be present in the coming days.

& # 39; My daughters Margaret and Liza will enter and leave this audience in the coming days. In the time since they were last seen in the White House, I am pleased to inform you that Margaret has recovered and has turned 13 years old. Margaret is the sweetest girl I've ever met. As for Liza, well, I tell her every night that nobody gives a better hug than Liza Kavanaugh, "he said.

Kavanaugh, a federal judge in Washington D.C., also expressed gratitude for her friends as she goes through the confirmation process.

"Last May, I delivered the graduation speech at Catholic University Law School, I gave the graduates this advice: appreciate your friends, watch your friends, raise your friends, love your friends," he said. "For the past 8 weeks, I've felt strengthened by the love of my friends, I thank all my friends."

His daughters Margaret and Liza had joined Kavanaugh and his wife at the start of the hearing with the youngest daughter Liza holding Kavanaugh's hand as she entered the room.

Kavanaugh was supposed to introduce his family at the beginning of the hearing, but interruptions by protesters and senators delayed that part of the process by approximately two hours.

Finally, the girls left the room while the Democrats expressed concern about their father's position on executive powers, the right to abortion and the rights to firearms, issues that will probably arise in the next two days when Kavanaugh faces questions of the panel.

The girls came back in the afternoon to listen to their father's opening statement.

Martha began to get excited just as Kavanaugh was choking a little when she talked about her father's work ethic and their shared love for sports.

Martha sat next to her husband Everett, her granddaughters Margaret and Liza and their daughter-in-law Ashley during the confirmation hearing

Martha sat next to her husband Everett, her granddaughters Margaret and Liza and their daughter-in-law Ashley during the confirmation hearing

Martha sat next to her husband Everett, her granddaughters Margaret and Liza and their daughter-in-law Ashley during the confirmation hearing

Liza Kavanaugh with her head in the head of mom Ashley Kavanaugh while sister Margaret sits next to her

Liza Kavanaugh with her head in the head of mom Ashley Kavanaugh while sister Margaret sits next to her

Liza Kavanaugh with her head in the head of mom Ashley Kavanaugh while sister Margaret sits next to her

While his opening speech ended the day on a quiet note, the first day of his time before the Senate committee was continually interrupted by protesters who expressed concern about his record on abortion rights and Democratic senators called for the hearing to be postponed so they could have more time to read the documents of their time in government.

The hearing began in a circus environment as the protesters took turns screaming and being pulled out by the US Capitol Police.

Seventy protesters were arrested, according to a statement from the US Capitol Police. UU

The Democrats on the committee did not even allow Republican President Chuck Grassley to finalize his opening statement before demanding that the hearing be postponed, so they had time to review 42,000 documents delivered to the committee Monday night.

One Republican senator described the hearing as a "mob government," while another Republican senator complained that he was shouted during his comments, calling for the "big mouth" to be eliminated.

It was so bad that Grassley promised that Wednesday's hearing, when the senators will have the opportunity to question Kavanaugh, would be different.

During his opening speech, Kavanaugh swore to be a "referee", a neutral and impartial arbitrator in the Supreme Court.

"A good judge must be an arbitrator, a neutral and impartial arbitrator who does not favor any litigant or policy," Kavanaugh said.

"My judicial philosophy is straightforward: a judge must be independent and must interpret the law, not make the law.A judge must interpret the statutes as they are written.A judge must interpret the Constitution as written, informed by history, Tradition and precedents In deciding cases, a judge must always keep in mind what Alexander Hamilton said in Federalist 83: "the rules of legal interpretation are rules of common sense."

Outside the audience, the protesters dressed in costumes of "The Tale of the Servant" greeted the senators who came to their first day with Kavanaugh

Outside the audience, the protesters dressed in costumes of "The Tale of the Servant" greeted the senators who came to their first day with Kavanaugh

Outside the audience, the protesters dressed in costumes of "The Tale of the Servant" greeted the senators who came to their first day with Kavanaugh

Demonstrators dressed in The Handmaid's Tale costume protest in front of the courtroom where the Supreme Court's nominated judge, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Demonstrators dressed in The Handmaid's Tale costume protest in front of the courtroom where the Supreme Court's nominated judge, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Demonstrators dressed in The Handmaid's Tale costume protest in front of the courtroom where the Supreme Court's nominated judge, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Tuesday marks the first day of Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing

Tuesday marks the first day of Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing

Tuesday marks the first day of Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing

Kavanaugh says he is proud of the more than 300 opinions he has written as a judge of the Court of Appeals.

"I tell people," Do not read what others say about my judicial opinions, read the opinions, "he said.

He concluded his opening statement with an optimistic note and with guarantees for the members of the committee.

I wait for the rest of the audience and their questions. I am an optimist. I live on the sunrise side of the mountain, not on the sunset side of the mountain. I see the next day, not the day that goes. I am optimistic about the future of America and the future of our independent judiciary. I reverence the Constitution. If it is confirmed to the Supreme Court, I will keep an open mind in all cases. I will do the same for the poor and the rich. I will always strive to preserve the Constitution of the United States and the rule of law in the United States, "he said.

The senators were forced to stop during their opening statements while screaming protesters interrupted the day.

Democratic Senator Dick Durbin recognized the protesters in the room.

& # 39; What we heard was the noise of democracy. This is what we hear when free people stand up to talk, "he said." It's not the mafia's rule. "

He continued to address the pressure on Kavanaugh and his family.

& # 39; There are times when it is uncomfortable. I'm sure it was for your children. I hope you can explain it, "he said.

And Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas apologized to Kavanaugh because his daughters had to experience the protests.

"I am sorry that your daughters have had to endure the political circus this morning," Cruz said. "That's Washington, unfortunately, in 2018."

The US Capitol Police UU Remove a protester from the confirmation hearing of Kavanaugh

The US Capitol Police UU Remove a protester from the confirmation hearing of Kavanaugh

The US Capitol Police UU Remove a protester from the confirmation hearing of Kavanaugh

The police take the protesters for processing

The police take the protesters for processing

The police take the protesters for processing

One by one, protesters interrupted Kavanaugh's audience

One by one, protesters interrupted Kavanaugh's audience

One by one, protesters interrupted Kavanaugh's audience

Protesters continuously interrupted Kavanaugh's audience

Protesters continuously interrupted Kavanaugh's audience

Protesters continuously interrupted Kavanaugh's audience

Republican Senator Ben Sasse also apologized to the family and said he was happy that the girls could leave.

"I'm glad that his daughters can leave the room and I hope they still have the day off from school," he said. Tuesday marked the first day of Washington D.C.

President Donald Trump defended his candidate and criticized the Democrats in a tweet sent while Kavanaugh gave his opening statement.

& # 39; Brett Kavanaugh's hearings for the future Justice of the Supreme Court are really a sample of how mean, angry and despicable the other side is. They will say anything, and they are just … ", he wrote.

& # 39; … seeking to inflict pain and shame on one of the most recognized jurists who has appeared before Congress. So sad to see!

The meeting was dominated by cries of protesters, complaints from Democratic senators, signage, removal of disruptors by the United States Capitol Police and the chairman of a committee beating his deck asking for "regular order". # 39;

& # 39; Please vote no! & # 39; a person in the audience shouted at the members of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The Trump presidency was also invoked.

"An illegitimate president can not make an appointment in the Supreme Court," another one shouted according to room reports.

"This should be an accusation process," another shouted.

Women protested Kavanaugh's position on abortion

Women protested Kavanaugh's position on abortion

Women protested Kavanaugh's position on abortion

Fred Guttenberg tweeted that Kavanaugh walked away from him when he showed up

Fred Guttenberg tweeted that Kavanaugh walked away from him when he showed up

Fred Guttenberg tweeted that Kavanaugh walked away from him when he showed up

Fred Guttenberg, the father of Jamie Guttenberg who died in the firing of Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, left, speaks after trying to shake the hand of Brett Kavanaugh

Fred Guttenberg, the father of Jamie Guttenberg who died in the firing of Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, left, speaks after trying to shake the hand of Brett Kavanaugh

Fred Guttenberg, the father of Jamie Guttenberg who died in the firing of Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, left, speaks after trying to shake the hand of Brett Kavanaugh

"If you vote for Brett Kavanaugh, we will replace you," one threatened the senators.

Another protester said: "My daughter deserves the right to choose."

"Stop the oppression of women," roared one protester after the hearing resumed after lunch.

"This is a mockery and a parody of justice," shouted another.

"Be a hero," a protester implored the senators.

"Vote for our children," another shouted.

"Hell, not Kavanaugh," a protester shouted.

Roe, yes; Kavanaugh – no, he read a sign held by a Code Pink protester in reference to the landmark Roe v. Supreme Court case. Wade who legalized abortion.

Outside the audience, protesters dressed in costumes from "The Tale of the Servant" greeted the senators arriving on their first day with Kavanaugh.

The distinctive red robes and white hats were placed by the protesters while they remained silent in the Hart Senate Office Building.

The women portrayed the characters in the popular dystopian drama "The Handmaid's Tale" on Hulu, based on the 1985 book by Margaret Atwood, where women are forced into sexual servitude and denied basic rights.

The group said they were there to protest against Kavanaugh's views "anti-abortion, anti-health and anti-woman".

Kavanaugh is replacing retired Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who was often a decisive vote in controversial cases. Kavanaugh, a more conservative federal judge, is expected to move the high court to the right.

The women, and many Democratic senators, are worried that Kavanaugh will be the deciding vote in a Supreme Court case that could overturn Roe v. Wade and make abortion illegal.

During a break for lunch at the hearing, Fred Guttenberg, whose daughter Jaime Guttenberg was one of the high school students killed in the Parkland High School shooting in February, wrote on Twitter that he tried to talk to Kavanaugh, who turned away from him.

I just approached Judge Kavanaugh when the morning session ended. I put out my hand to introduce myself as Jaime Guttenberg's father. He withdrew his hand, turned his back on me and walked away. I guess I did not want to deal with the reality of armed violence, "he wrote.

But the White House backed down, saying that security had prevented Guttenberg from speaking with Kavanaugh.

"When Judge Kavanaugh went to lunch, an unidentified individual approached him," said White House press secretary Raj Shah, "before the judge could shake his hand, security had intervened." who is handling Kavanaugh's confirmation.

But Guttenberg responded to Shah, saying that Senator Diane Feinstein, the highest ranking Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, introduced him.

& # 39; Wrong. I was here all day and presented by Senator Feinstein. No security involved. He turned around and walked away, "he tweeted in response.

Brett Kavanaugh Inaugural Statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee

Thank you, Mr. President, Senator Feinstein and committee members. I thank Secretary Rice, Senator Portman and Lisa Blatt for their generous presentations. They are patriots who represent the best of America. I am honored by your trust and proud to call each of them a friend.

In the last eight weeks, I have witnessed first-hand the deep appreciation of the Senate for the vital role of the American Judicial Branch. I have met with 65 senators, including almost all the members of this committee. These meetings are sometimes called "courtesy calls." But that term underestimates how substantive and personal our discussions have been. I have enjoyed the 65 meetings very much. By listening to all of you, I have learned a lot about our country and the people it represents. Each senator is dedicated to public service and the public good, and I thank all the senators for their time and their thoughts.

I thank President Trump for the honor of this nomination. As a judge and as a citizen, I was deeply impressed by the President's attention to the nomination process and his careful consideration of potential candidates. I am also very grateful for your courtesy. In the White House on the night of the announcement, the president and Mrs. Trump were very kind to my daughters, my wife and my parents. My family will always appreciate that night, or as my daughter Liza calls it, her debut on national television.

As a nominee to the Supreme Court, I understand the responsibility that I have. About 30 years ago, Judge Anthony Kennedy sat in this seat. He became one of the most consistent judges in the history of the United States. I served as a paralegal in 1993. For me, Justice Kennedy is a mentor, friend and hero. As a member of the Court, it was a model of urbanity and collegiality. He fiercely defended the independence of the Judiciary. And he was a champion of freedom. If I had to summarize the whole career of Judge Kennedy in one word … "freedom". Justice Kennedy established a legacy of freedom for us and our posterity.

I am here today with another of my judicial heroes … my mother. Fifty years ago, this week, in September of 1968, my mother was 26 and I was 3. That week, my mother started as a public school teacher at McKinley Tech High School here in Washington, DC 1968 was a difficult time for relationships race in our city and our country. McKinley Tech had an almost entirely African-American student body. It was east of the park. I vividly remember the days when I was a child sitting in the back of my mother's classroom while teaching American history to a class of African-American teenagers. His students were born before Brown versus Board of Education or Bolling versus Sharpe. With her example, my mother taught me the importance of equality for all Americans: equal rights, equal dignity and equality before the law.

My mother was a pioneer. When she was 10 years old, she went to law school at the American University and became a prosecutor. I am an only child, and my introduction to the law came at our table when he practiced his final arguments about my father and me. Her brand line was: "Use your common sense, what sounds real, what sounds false?" One of the few female attorneys at the time, overcame the barriers and was then appointed by the Democratic governors to serve as a judge for a Maryland state judgment. Our federal and state trial judges operate on the front lines of American justice. My mother taught me that judges do not deal with abstract theories; They decide real cases for real people in the real world. And she taught me that good judges should always be in the shoes of others. The President referred to me today as Judge Kavanaugh. But for me, that title will always belong to my mother.

For twelve years, I have been a judge in the US Court of Appeals. UU For the Circuit D.C. I have written more than 300 opinions and have handled more than 2,000 cases. I have given everything in all cases. I am proud of that body of work, and I support it. I tell people, "Do not read what others say about my judicial opinions Read the opinions." I have served along with 17 other judges, each one a colleague and a friend, in a court now led by our excellent Chief Judge, Merrick Garland. My judicial philosophy is direct. A judge must be independent and must interpret the law, not make the law. A judge must interpret the statutes as written. A judge must interpret the Constitution as written, informed by history, tradition and precedents. In deciding cases, a judge must always keep in mind what Alexander Hamilton said in Federalist 83: "the rules of legal interpretation are rules of common sense."

A good judge must be an arbitrator: a neutral and impartial arbitrator who does not favor any litigant or policy. As Judge Kennedy explained in Texas versus Johnson, one of his best opinions, judges do not make decisions to achieve a preferred outcome. The judges make decisions because "the law and the Constitution, as we see them, force the result". In the last 12 years, I have failed sometimes for the accusation and sometimes for the accused, sometimes for workers and sometimes for companies, sometimes for environmentalists and, sometimes, for coal miners. In each case, I followed the law. I do not decide cases based on personal or political preferences. I am not a pro-plaintiff or pro respondent judge. I am not a judge in favor of the accusation nor in favor of the defense. I am a judge in favor of the law.

As Judge Kennedy showed us, a judge must be independent, not influenced by public pressure. Our independent judiciary is the jewel in the crown of our constitutional republic. In our independent judiciary, the Supreme Court is the last line of defense for the separation of powers and the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution.

The Supreme Court should never be seen as a partisan institution. The judges of the Supreme Court do not sit on opposite sides of a corridor. They do not meet in separate rooms. If confirmed to the Court, it would be part of a Team of the Nine, committed to resolving the cases in accordance with the Constitution and the laws of the United States. I will always strive to be a team player in the Team of Nine.

Throughout my life, I have tried to serve the common good, in accordance with the motto of my Jesuit school: "men for others". I spent my career in public service. I have taught at Washington Jesuit Academy, a rigorous school with no tuition for children from low-income families. At Catholic Charities at Tenth and G, I serve meals to the homeless with my friend Father John Enzler. In those works, I keep the message of Matthew 25 in mind and try to serve the less fortunate among us. I know that sometimes I fall short, but I always want to do more and do it better.

For the past seven years, I have trained my daughters' basketball teams. I love to train All the girls that I have trained are incredible. And special congratulations to the girls of the 6th grade CYO championship team this year: Anna, Quinn, Kelsey, Ceane, Chloe, Alex, Ava, Sophia and Margaret. I love helping girls to become safe players. I know that confidence in the basketball court translates into confidence in other aspects of life. Title Nine helped make women's and girls' sports equal, and I see the legacy of that law every night when I enter my house because my daughters are returning from lacrosse, basketball or hockey practice. I know for my own life that those who teach and train the youth of the United States are among the most influential people in our country. With a kind word here and a touch of encouragement there … a word of discipline delivered in a spirit of love … teachers and coaches change lives. I thank all of my teachers and coaches who have helped me up to this point, and I thank all the teachers and coaches throughout the United States.

As a judge, I have tried to train the next generation of lawyers and leaders. For 12 years, I have taught constitutional laws to hundreds of students, primarily at Harvard Law School. I teach that the separation of powers from the Constitution protects individual freedom. I am grateful to all my students. I learned a lot from them. And I'm especially grateful to the dean who hired me for the first time, now, Magistrate Elena Kagan.

One of the best parts of my job as a judge is to hire four new law school graduates each year to serve as my legal assistants during the year. Contract to the best. My employees of the law come from diverse backgrounds and points of view. The majority of my 48 legal employees have been women. More than a quarter of my legal employees have been minorities. And I've had many more African-American law employees than the percentage of African-American students in the US law faculties. UU I am proud of all my legal employees.

I am grateful for my friends. Last May, I delivered the graduation address at Catholic University Law School. I gave the graduates this advice: appreciate your friends. Be careful with your friends Raise your friends. Love your friends … For the past 8 weeks, I have been strengthened by the love of my friends. I thank all my friends

I'm grateful to have my family behind me. My mother receives a lot of attention. Then some words about my dad. He has an unparalleled work ethic, and the gift of making friends with everyone, no matter who they are or where they come from. We are both passionate fans of sports. When I was 7 years old, he took me to the 1972 NFC Championship Game at RFK Stadium, just two miles from here, Section 503 top, Row 3, Seating 8 and 9. When I was 17, we sat in the same seats for the 1982 NFC Championship Game. In 1995, when he was 30 years old, we were together at Camden Yards when Cal Ripken played in his 2,131st consecutive game and broke the seemingly unbreakable record of Lou Gehrig. And so many other games with my dad. A life of friendship and memories, forged in the stadium seats on hot dogs and beer.

My daughters Margaret and Liza will enter and leave this courtroom in the coming days. In the time since they were last seen in the White House, I am pleased to inform you that Margaret has recovered and has turned 13 years old. As for Liza, well, I tell her every night that nobody gives her a better hug than Liza Kavanaugh.

Finally, I thank my wife, Ashley. She is a strong western Texan, graduated from Abilene Cooper Public High School and the University of Texas at Austin. She is now the popular manager of our local community. This has not been exactly the summer that she had planned for our family. I am grateful for your love and inspiration. Ashley is a kind soul. She always sees kindness in others. She has made me a better person and a better judge. I thank God every day for my family.

Mr. President, Senator Feinstein and members of the Committee, I look forward to the rest of the hearing and your questions. I am an optimist. I live on the sunrise side of the mountain, not on the sunset side of the mountain. I see the next day, not the day that goes. I am optimistic about the future of America and the future of our independent judiciary. I reverence the Constitution. If it is confirmed to the Supreme Court, I will keep an open mind in all cases. I will do the same for the poor and the rich. I will always strive to preserve the Constitution of the United States and the rule of law in the United States.

Thank you.

.